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How many play concertinas from the 1850's


Larry Stout
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Hi

I play a Joseph Scates treble 1851 english (amboyna) and I have just aquired an 1856/7? (the question mark reflects the fact that the actual number doesn't show in the Ledgers but the series around it does) Wheatstone baritone (Rosewood)No. 9408. Both these concertinas are brass reeded but have significantly differing actions.

I mention from time to time (so I'll mention it in this post) that I am interested in any descriptions, label addresses and serial numbers for any Joseph Scates concertinas that players/collectors have.

chris

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Hi

I play a Joseph Scates treble 1851 english (amboyna) and I have just aquired an 1856/7? (the question mark reflects the fact that the actual number doesn't show in the Ledgers but the series around it does) Wheatstone baritone (Rosewood)No. 9408. Both these concertinas are brass reeded but have significantly differing actions.

I mention from time to time (so I'll mention it in this post) that I am interested in any descriptions, label addresses and serial numbers for any Joseph Scates concertinas that players/collectors have.

chris

Chris, am I right in thinking that your Avatar is of your Baritone?

 

If so, have you any other photos of it? ....... hint hint ;)

 

Cheers

Dick

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hi Dick

the avitar is the Scates treble.

The rosewood Wheatstone is the baritone. If you're 'collecting' photos of baritones I could try and post a pick. I have to say it's a fairly basic baritone, although the fret work is very similar to the Scates in design. It seems to be hand cut fret work rather than spindle routed as in Lachenals & later Wheatstones

chris

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hi Dick

the avitar is the Scates treble.

The rosewood Wheatstone is the baritone. If you're 'collecting' photos of baritones I could try and post a pick. I have to say it's a fairly basic baritone, although the fret work is very similar to the Scates in design. It seems to be hand cut fret work rather than spindle routed as in Lachenals & later Wheatstones

chris

Chris, that's my own Baritone in my Avatar & yes, I am interested in the big beasties, being very fond of my own.

 

I'd also be fascinated to know how many Baritones are still out there being played on a regular basis.

 

Cheers

Dick

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Wheatstones from the 1850's

On another thread it became evident that two of us play Wheatstones made in 1851. This led me to wonder how many concertinas from the 1850's are still being played. I have two (a treble 2667 and a baritone 2037). How many others are there out there still being played?

 

I regularly play a 1856 Wheatstone treble. Green bellows, etc. steel buttons, brasas reeds. Sweet mellow instrument.

 

Lesfix

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Wheatstones from the 1850's
On another thread it became evident that two of us play Wheatstones made in 1851. This led me to wonder how many concertinas from the 1850's are still being played. I have two (a treble 2667 and a baritone 2037). How many others are there out there still being played?

 

I regularly play a 1856 Wheatstone treble. Green bellows, etc. steel buttons, brasas reeds. Sweet mellow instrument.

 

Lesfix

 

I also play a similar instrument.

 

Gregdav

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On another thread it became evident that two of us play Wheatstones made in 1851. This led me to wonder how many concertinas from the 1850's are still being played. I have two (a treble 2667 and a baritone 2037). How many others are there out there still being played?

 

 

Well, there's my 1854 Wheatstone baritone, serial no. not to hand, as it is currently on the receiving end of some TLC from a certain Mr Dipper.

 

Chris

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Well, there's my 1854 Wheatstone baritone, serial no. not to hand, as it is currently on the receiving end of some TLC from a certain Mr Dipper.

No.5199. :)

 

What a wizz your are with numbers Peter. Thank you. I must have it's serial number written down somewhere but can't place my hand on it at present. People will be asking, "How did he know that?" But we'll keep it a secret for now, eh, Peter?

 

Chris

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Well, there's my 1854 Wheatstone baritone, serial no. not to hand, as it is currently on the receiving end of some TLC from a certain Mr Dipper.

No.5199. :)

 

What a wizz your are with numbers Peter. Thank you. I must have it's serial number written down somewhere but can't place my hand on it at present. People will be asking, "How did he know that?" But we'll keep it a secret for now, eh, Peter?

 

Chris

 

I recently got a Wheatstone Baritone from 1851 restored, and I'm beginning to play it. My Wheatstone Treble is only from about 1898 or so.

I wonder if there are any PRE-1850s instrument/Wheatstones out there that are in use, personally..

 

Pictures, if anyone would like to see!

 

---

 

Patrick

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On another thread it became evident that two of us play Wheatstones made in 1851. This led me to wonder how many concertinas from the 1850's are still being played. I have two (a treble 2667 and a baritone 2037). How many others are there out there still being played?

Looking at the posts there seems to be a lot of Wheatstones around from 1851.

I wonder if that would be anything to do with the Great Exhibition being that year.

 

Martyn

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Hi Patrick

I'm curious as to what type of action your baritone has? Have you looked inside? If so, do you have any photos?

chris

 

Chris, I looked inside it when I first got it. I've since had it restored by the Concertina Connection, and just got it back last week. I'm a little hesitant to take it apart now that it's all working! So I can't really remember the kind of action---I shoulda taken pictures!

 

It's definitely slower to "speak" than my Treble, but boy does it sound nice! :)

 

 

---

 

Patrick

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On another thread it became evident that two of us play Wheatstones made in 1851. This led me to wonder how many concertinas from the 1850's are still being played. I have two (a treble 2667 and a baritone 2037). How many others are there out there still being played?

 

My Wheatstone treble EC is #5892 which dates it to 1853 or 1854. It's been quite substantially restored at some point (new reproduction bellows, felting, pads etc) and so is probably good for another 150 years if I and my successors continue to look after it.

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