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Complete beginners needs help!


Queen Lud
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Hello. I am new to this forum and to the world of the concertina, and am looking for some advice (no doubt the first query of many).

I have bought a very cheap 30 button Anglo Scarlatti - whilst I learn and save up money for something much, much better. I have learnt the C and G buttons but am a bit stuck with the third (accidentals?) row. Can someone advise me what layout it follows?

I thank you kindly.

Queen Lud

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This is a difficult question to answer since there is more than 1 standard layout (yes, I know, but anglos are bizarre beasts, that's part of their attraction). The best thing to do is to find a friend with a keyboard instrument of some kind and work out what you've got with their help.

 

The Concertina FAQ has diagrams of layouts for all the major concertina systems. You will find the relevant page here. Also: welcome to the forum. You've come to the right place for advice and help, but the wrong place if you want to be cured of the addiction which now has you in it's grip.

 

Cheers,

 

Chris

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Hello. I am new to this forum and to the world of the concertina, and am looking for some advice (no doubt the first query of many).

I have bought a very cheap 30 button Anglo Scarlatti - whilst I learn and save up money for something much, much better. I have learnt the C and G buttons but am a bit stuck with the third (accidentals?) row. Can someone advise me what layout it follows?

I thank you kindly.

Queen Lud

If I remember correctly, the Scarlatti has the standard Wheatstone 30-button layout as shown here:

http://www.concertina.info/tina.faq/images/finger3.htm

 

Ladydetemps (LDT) of this forum also plays a Scarlatti 30-button anglo, so I think she can confirm or counter my statement.

Welcome to the forum and the world of concertinas and good luck with your learning!

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I suppose if all else fails you could use a chromatic electronic tuner. You do need to know the notes but don't get too distracted. You actually only need to know the notes needed to play the current tune you're learning. The anglo is a beautiful instrument.

 

Hello. I am new to this forum and to the world of the concertina, and am looking for some advice (no doubt the first query of many).

I have bought a very cheap 30 button Anglo Scarlatti - whilst I learn and save up money for something much, much better. I have learnt the C and G buttons but am a bit stuck with the third (accidentals?) row. Can someone advise me what layout it follows?

I thank you kindly.

Queen Lud

If I remember correctly, the Scarlatti has the standard Wheatstone 30-button layout as shown here:

http://www.concertina.info/tina.faq/images/finger3.htm

 

Ladydetemps (LDT) of this forum also plays a Scarlatti 30-button anglo, so I think she can confirm or counter my statement.

Welcome to the forum and the world of concertinas and good luck with your learning!

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I must admit that I've only found two tunes so far that have needed notes from the accidental row - Bluebell Polka and The Snow it Melts the Soonest. But that may just be a reflection of what I prefer playing (mostly English trad and Morris tunes). Or a lack of experimentation with playing in different keys. :unsure:

 

If you have access to a Mac computer with GarageBand software, that has an electronic tuner built in - playing each note into a connected mike (or the on-board one) will display the name of the note on the screen.

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I must admit that I've only found two tunes so far that have needed notes from the accidental row - Bluebell Polka and The Snow it Melts the Soonest. But that may just be a reflection of what I prefer playing (mostly English trad and Morris tunes). Or a lack of experimentation with playing in different keys. :unsure:

 

The "accidental row" doesn't just contain accidentals, some of the buttons offer alternative ways of playing notes from the home keys. This gives you the choice of playing a phrase legato when you don't want to break up the chords with a change of bellows direction, or with lots of push-pull when you want to emphasise the rhythm. This can be just as useful for English trad or morris as for other types of music.

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I must admit that I've only found two tunes so far that have needed notes from the accidental row - Bluebell Polka and The Snow it Melts the Soonest. But that may just be a reflection of what I prefer playing (mostly English trad and Morris tunes). Or a lack of experimentation with playing in different keys. :unsure:

 

The "accidental row" doesn't just contain accidentals, some of the buttons offer alternative ways of playing notes from the home keys. This gives you the choice of playing a phrase legato when you don't want to break up the chords with a change of bellows direction, or with lots of push-pull when you want to emphasise the rhythm. This can be just as useful for English trad or morris as for other types of music.

:lol: like playing 'David of the White Rock' in Eb minor :lol:

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Hello. I am new to this forum and to the world of the concertina, and am looking for some advice (no doubt the first query of many).

I have bought a very cheap 30 button Anglo Scarlatti - whilst I learn and save up money for something much, much better. I have learnt the C and G buttons but am a bit stuck with the third (accidentals?) row. Can someone advise me what layout it follows?

I thank you kindly.

Queen Lud

:) If you're coming to Whitby during this year for any of the festivals PM me and you can have a go on my Dipper :D

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I've played for about 20 years now...........on a three row and even a forty button.

 

Some people would say I play quite well.....others would differ, but I manage to keep two Morris sides focussed most of the time....although again, that's not saying much.

 

My New Year's resolution was to try to get to grips with the third row.

This has been my New Year's resolution for at least ten years.

 

It still mystifies me most of the time.............EXCEPT for a few really useful buttons.

 

Left hand side 5. This lets you play a really useful F chord.

 

Left hand 2........same notes as C row left 1.......but the other way around. Ever so useful.

Similarly Right hand 2.........can't think for the moment what it does but it's REALLY USEFUL.

 

Also, I've just discovered Right hand 3 gives you a really useful black note.

 

SO........to cut to the chase, You could get twenty years of fun and freedom before you even get to need too many notes from the third row. Some people might say learn to play stuff that you enjoy using the two main rows and someday soon, you'll find out why you need the third row. Others might not agree.

 

In the meantime, do what you do do best.

Phil

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Thanks Phil.

 

I've been trying to learn some simple tunes on the C & G rows and think I will stick to that for a while.

 

Am a bit concerned as my left hand C/D button is sounding a little bit strange (a bit wheezy). Not sure what I have done to it.

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