Jump to content

Scandinavian players


Gusten
 Share

Recommended Posts

...

...

Whoa! One them Texas thaings!

/Henrik

 

Well Henrik, they certainly won't roll off the table, when your back is turned! ;)

 

A few years back, a young teenage Swedish girl stayed with us for 3 months, before she went on to Uni.

She played the Fiddle & actually came over to learn some Irish tunes, so she came to every session.

However, almost all the Swedish tunes she played for us seemed to have an element of sadness to them. Lovely tunes, but just a bit sad. :(

Are they all like that or are there any HAPPY Swedish tunes? ;)

 

Cheers

Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 36
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

However, almost all the Swedish tunes she played for us seemed to have an element of sadness to them. Lovely tunes, but just a bit sad. :(

Are they all like that or are there any HAPPY Swedish tunes? ;)

 

Cheers

Dick

 

Hehe, you do have a point there. I think that traditionally, the Swedish people has found comfort in being grumpy.

For me, a tratidional tune that is THE swedish folk song would be Gånglåt från Äppelbo.

 

The swedish traditional music isn't very big anymore, unfortunally. Now, people butch it like this instead:

 

But, on the other hand, folk songs and folk music is supposed to be the music of the people. I suppose it's only proper to keep it aligned with what the people actually wants, otherwise it would just be... old fart's music.

 

(Gånglåt från Äppelbo is really fun to play on the Concertina by the way, in G (on C/G anglo).)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tj:a Gusten

 

Here in south-east Norway (Oslo - Svinesund) I know of three players other than me. They all play EC, but I (try to) play Irish music on a Morse C/G Jeffries.

 

If ever around, call in for a few tunes at the Dubliner in Oslo on Tuesday nights and Saturday afternoons.

 

Snorre

Edited by Snorre
Link to comment
Share on other sites

...

they certainly won't roll off the table, when your back is turned! ;)

...

...

Are they all like that or are there any HAPPY Swedish tunes? ;)

...

You are right - when it comes to rolling, it goes to the top of the (melodeon)class :lol:

 

I know what you mean by "element of sadness". But Sweden is so large (=long) that the mood of tunes vary a lot between the different landscapes. You will find a lot of the minor-stuff in Dalarna, north-west of Stockholm, far from where Gusten and I live - basically the distance from London to Glasgow, to put a scale to it.

 

Maybe minor keys are associated with geographical isolation - gets you down, you know...

 

But here, in the deep South, tunes tend to be brighter and happier (vicinity to Denmark? Banging my own drum now :P )

 

/Henrik

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(Gånglåt från Äppelbo is really fun to play on the Concertina by the way, in G (on C/G anglo).)

Pretty good on the G/D anglo as well! It's a fairly well-known tune in English music sessions as well. (Quick aside, England has its own traditional music as well, very different in feel from Irish. English music sessions tend to have quite a lot of music from other traditions as well; if it feels right, we'll play it). Other Swedish favourites that get played quite widely over here include Serpentiner och Konfetti and Schottis fran Idre.

 

Chris

 

Edite to correct my spelling of Serpentiner och Konfetti. Sorry.

Edited by Chris Timson
Link to comment
Share on other sites

(Gånglåt från Äppelbo is really fun to play on the Concertina by the way, in G (on C/G anglo).)

Pretty good on the G/D anglo as well! It's a fairly well-known tune in English music sessions as well. (Quick aside, England has its own traditional music as well, very different in feel from Irish. English music sessions tend to have quite a lot of muysic from other traditions as well; if it feels right, we'll play it). Other Swedish favourites that get played quite widely over here include Serpentina Och Confetti and Schottis fran Idre.

 

Chris

 

There was also Jody's Tune of the Month for 10/07, Gånglåt från Mockfjärd (though the fiddle has the melody in the traditional version and the first part of the jig version). It sounds nice and cheerful to me...

 

Joshua Mackay-Smith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know little about scandinavian music but the little I have listened to

has delighted me. I would be curious in hearing what a concertina would

sound like in that context.

Could somebody indicate recordings or videos ?

 

I make no claims for authenticity(!), but look/listen here - towards the bottom of that page.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regrettably Anne and I won't be. We had very much hoped and intended to make it, but as it turned out we couldn't square the dates with Anne's university course. I'm very sad about that since it will probably be the only chance we'll have to see you and Hendrik and Henk and Jim and Pontus and Louise and the rest of the gang this year. Bugger Drat! Anyway, have a good time in Torna Hällestad.

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(Gånglåt från Äppelbo is really fun to play on the Concertina by the way, in G (on C/G anglo).)

Pretty good on the G/D anglo as well! It's a fairly well-known tune in English music sessions as well. (Quick aside, England has its own traditional music as well, very different in feel from Irish. English music sessions tend to have quite a lot of music from other traditions as well; if it feels right, we'll play it). Other Swedish favourites that get played quite widely over here include Serpentiner och Konfetti and Schottis fran Idre.

 

Chris

 

Edite to correct my spelling of Serpentiner och Konfetti. Sorry.

 

Ah yes Chris

 

Gånglåt från Aplebo and Schottis från Indre are both in the repertoire of the group, "Halmsträket (Straw Bow)", that I've started to play with over here.

Edited by fidjit
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for indicating these tunes, I'm tempted to try some of them.

 

I make no claims for authenticity(!), but look/listen here - towards the bottom of that page.

 

Hello Dany,

I listened to some of your tunes, the cello and concertina really fit well together.

To my ear it sounds more "baroque" than "traditional" but it is indeed very nice.

 

I was also very interested by other stuff I found on you web site;

I'll contact you out of this forum about this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(Gånglåt från Äppelbo is really fun to play on the Concertina by the way, in G (on C/G anglo).)

Pretty good on the G/D anglo as well! It's a fairly well-known tune in English music sessions as well. (Quick aside, England has its own traditional music as well, very different in feel from Irish. English music sessions tend to have quite a lot of muysic from other traditions as well; if it feels right, we'll play it). Other Swedish favourites that get played quite widely over here include Serpentina Och Confetti and Schottis fran Idre.

 

Chris

 

There was also Jody's Tune of the Month for 10/07, Gånglåt från Mockfjärd (though the fiddle has the melody in the traditional version and the first part of the jig version). It sounds nice and cheerful to me...

 

Joshua Mackay-Smith

 

Hi Joshua,

 

Well actually, I am playing melody more than you might think. When fiddle and concertina are playing melody together they blend so well it does tend to sound like the concertina is only playing all that other stuff I'm doing. The second time around on the tune I've got the melody and Sam is playing harmony. Gånglåt från Mockfjärd fits very nicely on the G/D Anglo and so do lots of other swedish tunes.

 

How about Norwegian tunes? Here is one I know you will all like, though I have not attempted it on Anglo... yet.

 

 

 

rare footage of endangered traditional norwegian folk music, recorded in a small village on the west coast of Norway, 1967.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(Gånglåt från Äppelbo is really fun to play on the Concertina by the way, in G (on C/G anglo).)

Pretty good on the G/D anglo as well! It's a fairly well-known tune in English music sessions as well. (Quick aside, England has its own traditional music as well, very different in feel from Irish. English music sessions tend to have quite a lot of music from other traditions as well; if it feels right, we'll play it). Other Swedish favourites that get played quite widely over here include Serpentiner och Konfetti and Schottis fran Idre.

 

 

 

And, let's not forget the delightful Boda Waltz (Bodavalsen) and 'Will You Patch Your Pants For Me', an American adaption of a Swedish tune, of which there is a nice version in Nick Barber's English Choice, a book of 47 English session tunes, available fron Hobgoblin.

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's also, EnnisTraveler a member here. At the moment in Ireland, but retuning soon to Vårgon.

 

Is that close to concert pitch? :rolleyes:

 

Just down the road on the left. er. No on the right . Oh Bugger. you'll find it. :ph34r:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Boda Waltz (Bodavalsen)

One of our regulars recently introduced this to our session recently and it was an instant hit.

 

Chris

 

Well, let's make sure it gets played it The Radway reunion, then, mate! There is also Sommarvals - The Geckoes do a nice version of it followed by The Furze Field, on their album Red Horse. Question. How do you tell a swede from a turnip? They both look the same to me!

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


Make a Donation


×
×
  • Create New...