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Classic question - Old vs New


Gusten
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does anyone know which of these "hybrid" makers (if any) are based in Europe? If I end up buying a brand new one, I might as well try to order one as close to Sweden as possible. I'll regard it as my contribution to the environment...

 

A C Norman, England

 

Marcus Music, Wales

 

Harry Geuns, Belgium

I would add these to above three

A. P. James, England

Sherwood (Hobgoblin), England

 

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Taka

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I would add these to above three

A. P. James, England

Sherwood (Hobgoblin), England

 

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Taka

 

Ah, right, there we have the Sherwood again. It sounds like a lower budget alternative (without saying it's a lesser alternative), but there doesn't seem to be much experiences from them. Just one review on them (which is a whole lot more than none, thanks), but would be interesting to hear from more people who have picked one up and tried it. They look nice, and the brief information on the page sounds solid...

 

Thanks for the two more links, Taka.

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Guest Peter Laban

I think both the thought all old concertinas are rackety and troublesome and the one that says all modern ones are troublefree, well-made and fast instruments , if not having the concertina sound, are obvious generalisations.

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does anyone know which of these "hybrid" makers (if any) are based in Europe? If I end up buying a brand new one, I might as well try to order one as close to Sweden as possible. I'll regard it as my contribution to the environment...

 

A C Norman, England

 

Marcus Music, Wales

 

Harry Geuns, Belgium

I would add these to above three

A. P. James, England

Sherwood (Hobgoblin), England

 

--

Taka

 

I can highly recomend the geuns concertina. Great action, first class bellows, responsive reeds and a sweet tone for a hybrid. I'm happy that I upgraded 18 month before. This brought me very much foreward.

Good luck

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Tell me, would you rather live

 

here?

 

or

 

here?

 

Perhaps it make a difference, what music you play on your Concertina.

 

For example, I could understand a Jazz or Classical musician perhaps more often, going for a new, & therefore less troublesome instrument.

Whereas I would imagine a traditional musician might usually prefer to have the feel & history of a vintage instrument.

 

Or, is it perhaps the case that younger musicians tend to go for New Concertinas while us old farts would rather have a Vintage instrument? :lol:

 

Cheers

Dick

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Perhaps it make a difference, what music you play on your Concertina.

 

For example, I could understand a Jazz or Classical musician perhaps more often, going for a new, & therefore less troublesome instrument.

Whereas I would imagine a traditional musician might usually prefer to have the feel & history of a vintage instrument.

 

Or, is it perhaps the case that younger musicians tend to go for New Concertinas while us old farts would rather have a Vintage instrument? :lol:

 

Cheers

Dick

 

I use it for irish traditional music, and I really do prefer the sound of the vintage instruments. As I'm merely 25 years old, I expect to play the concertina for many, many years to come. That's why I'm, at the moment, leaning towards getting myself an instrument that has the best possible "playability", so I have the best possible base to learn playing on. When I feel that I've learned enough (and had time to earn enough cash), I'll upgrade to a good vintage concertina.

 

I'm switching back and forth all the time though, as every now and then I lean towards getting a concertina that sounds the way I want, and that it'll be worth sacrificing a bit of "playability".

 

I really don't know why I keep bring this up, as I stopped contributing to this thread long ago. I'm just very grateful for all the input, that's why I keep posting. I take all your comments and experiences to heart, and try to form my own opinion. Thanks guys!

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I think both the thought all old concertinas are rackety and troublesome and the one that says all modern ones are troublefree, well-made and fast instruments , if not having the concertina sound, are obvious generalisations.

Agreed.

I thought trouble rate is still higher for the vintage concertinas but it is only personal feeling, and definitely not all old concertinas are rackety and troublesome.

And I shouldn't have put the link to APJ because I haven't played that one yet. I am not sure that it plays same as other modern hybrids. (Does anyone have played APJ's ?)

 

--

Taka

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I take all your comments and experiences to heart, and try to form my own opinion. Thanks guys!

 

Yes, that's the wonderful thing about Forums.

 

A couple of years ago, I wanted to upgrade to a new American made Hammered Dulcimer, but of course couldn't afford to go over there & try them all out, so I spent weeks asking question after question on the American Dulcimer forum. I learned so much about all the different makes & makers both from replies & pms & I was eventually able to choose the perfect Dulcimer for me.

 

Without the forum & all that first hand experience from the helpful & friendly members I'd have just had to take pot luck & could well have ended up with a turkey! :(

 

So yes, the decision is always yours at the end of it all, but hopefully, many of the replies will help you to make your decision.

 

Cheers & Good Luck

Dick

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Perhaps it make a difference, what music you play on your Concertina.

 

For example, I could understand a Jazz or Classical musician perhaps more often, going for a new, & therefore less troublesome instrument.

Whereas I would imagine a traditional musician might usually prefer to have the feel & history of a vintage instrument.

 

Or, is it perhaps the case that younger musicians tend to go for New Concertinas while us old farts would rather have a Vintage instrument? :lol:

 

Cheers

Dick

 

Old fart :lol: I am one too :P

Seriously though, personal preference for me is to have new instruments every time. The same goes for houses, furniture, etc.

I have had old, especially with fiddles and they don't seem to solely belong to *me*.....they bring their past owners with them :unsure:

 

I play irish music exclusively and both fiddles and concertinas require upkeep/taking apart/repairs.

Now old instruments will be *as new* if totally re-done.....and there is the catch for some people....cost.

New instruments is a bit like having central heating installed.....all cosy and warm with a guarantee.

 

Old instruments depending on the maker may have playability issues built in and I would expect that most do not play like another

but have little differences depending on how they have been treat and restored.

New would have less differences as the tolerances would have been sorted in the initial design.

 

Cost of old instruments is not the only factor........for me is the worry that something may happen to it...beer spilled/damaged

beyond repair, etc. We ended up buying and taking out a Morse as it could be replaced a lot more easily than the Jeffries. That meant

the Jeffries was left behind and that is a shame.

 

So give me new everytime. :P

 

Sharron

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.....they bring their past owners with them :unsure: ....

New instruments is a bit like having central heating installed.....all cosy and warm with a guarantee.

 

But isn't that the point about traditional music! - when you play a trad tune you bring their past 'owners' with it - there is a sense of passing on the tunes. Ditto for instruments..

 

I wouldn't be too gone on the central heating analogy either as there people who link the rise in centrally heated homes to various illnesses & allergies in the modern western life style.

 

But crafting your own instrument is different I think, it may be new, but you have strong links to it in terms of time invested.

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New instruments is a bit like having central heating installed.....all cosy and warm with a guarantee.

 

Och Sharron, there's nothing quite like relaxing in front of an open fire, now is there?

 

Let's be honest here, sitting in front of a Radiator doesn't quite hit the spot, does it? ;)

 

.... especially when your boiler breaks down! :lol:

 

Cheers

Dick

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Let's be honest here, sitting in front of a Radiator doesn't quite hit the spot, does it? ;)

 

.... especially when your boiler breaks down! :lol:

Reminds me of my nightmare, last March, when my boiler did just that, and I sat and shivered in front of an electric heater for a couple of days! The joys of central heating ...... and my house is older than my Jeffries!

 

Regards,

Peter.

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I would love an open fire.......without the work :lol:

Smokeless fuel is just not the same though..

We have an open fire......gas .....real flames and you could put the toast on a toasting fork and have *real* toast.:P

My central heating broke down on Christmas evening and repaired Boxing day.......it is about 20 years old though.

I think when I replace it I will get a NEW one :lol:

 

Bringing *past owners* along gives me the creeps.

I don't watch scary movies with ghosties in either.

So I still would have the new.

 

The pair of us have had old...very old...instruments and they have smells attached/places worn where *other* fingers have been.......gives me bumps just thinking about it :huh:

 

As for making your own instruments.....yeah, it is nice......not cheap though.

It started off as something interesting and a bit of a challenge especially as I have no woodworking experience at all.

Made my first fiddle, 2nd fiddle and realised that I wasn't playing my 3 bought fiddles incl. a luthier made one......then by the 3rd fiddle I still wasn't playing them and sold them.

I don't know if this happens to anyone else, but as soon as I have my latest fiddle made I then don't play my previous ones.

Bet the same will happen with my husband........he won't stop either.

 

So buying or making there is still that elusive just out of reach instrument to strive for and that is BLOOMIN BRILLIANT :lol:

 

Sharron

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Old instruments have their own stories, even if we don't know them. The fiddle I play was played by my grandfather for dances while he was working his way through college (1912-1916). My concertinas are all older than I am. Their stories are about someone else's (great) grandfather or grandmother. All of these were quality instruments which have gotten some refurbishing along the way and I'm careful to take care of them. When I bought my mandolin (also from the 1916 or so era) the question from the shop owner was ``do you want to play it or hang it on the wall''--I've gotten all my instruments to play them, not to display them.

 

Some of my other instruments are new-- my lute dates from 1976; my viola d'amore was made for me in 2000; my cheap octave mandolin was also new. I couldn't have afforded or found vintage ones of these and it wouldn't have been a reasonable expense, since I didn't know how to play any of them when I got them.

 

I've made a few of my own instruments, too. They're not very good.

 

There are very good vintage instruments; there are very good modern instruments. There are also questionable ones of both types. Find one you like, or buy on a whim. Enjoy it. Concertinas are all cheaper than houses or reliable cars. Then there's the addage "never buy a house younger than you are or a car older than you are."

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Old instruments have their own stories, even if we don't know them.

 

 

We had a little MG about 6 months old we bought from a garage.........many years ago.

This was our pride and joy, but the car had a mind of it's own.

We seemed to have a problem stopping it from *bumping* into things.

Anyway, after about 6 weeks of ownership we had an accident...not serious but requiring a New *front end*.

 

A few weeks after it was repaired my husband was filling it up with petrol at a garage and a gentleman asked about our car as he knew it's history.

Apparently a friend of his owned the car from new and was on holiday when it acted up and was taken to a garage to be looked over.

The mechanic took it out to test drive it as they couldn't find anything wrong with it.

He unfortunately was killed instantly whilst driving the car.

 

Now we knew nothing of this, yet we both believe the car was jinxed.....and this was a new car.

Old instruments have probably a lot of stories to tell.......I don't want to hear them.

 

The car by the way was sold pronto back to the same garage.

 

So anything that has a *sense* about it doesn't get a look in........I don't want to know.

 

People either love/loathe the old/new for whatever their reasons.

I guess I am just downright superstitious now.

 

Sharron

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Old instruments have their own stories, even if we don't know them. The fiddle I play was played by my grandfather for dances while he was working his way through college (1912-1916).

 

Yes Larry, I have my Great Grandfathers old Fiddle & he worked as a farm labourer living in bothies around the Borders of Scotland, so of course I love playing that old Fiddle & I just wish it could talk, I bet it could tell me some great stories.

 

On the other hand I also play a Fiddle which I bought new, from a life long friend who happens to be a Fiddle maker.

The only stories it knows are the ones it's enjoyed with me. ;)

 

I also play a new Mandolin & Octave Mandola but playing these new instruments is more like just using a tool.

 

When I play old trad tunes on my vintage Concertinas, Banjo or Fiddle, it's like I don't have to try so hard to put heart & soul into the music, because it sort of comes out naturally on the old instrument. ...... creepy X Files music! 2.gif 2.gif 2.gif 2.gif 2.gif 2.gif 2.gif 2.gif

 

Cheers

Dick

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