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baritone Anglo?


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I've put a couple of files on Sound Lantern.

 

http://www.soundlantern.com/SoundPage.do?ToId=27368

 

Wakker midi anglo played through Kontact 2, an Edirol UA-4FX usb midi and recorded straight to mp3 with Zoom H4 from audio output. Samples created from a Carrol C/G by Michael Eskin.Lowest note sampled was G3, lowest note played C1 I think. Every so often all notes hang, I have left them in, only edits were to chop beginning and end.

 

I prefer playing this setup in the baritone range. The anglo has 2 buttons on the left which shift up and down over 5 octaves. 2 buttons on right select different layers so with samples loaded with different keys in kontact 2 you can change from C/G to G/D instantly. With the samples stretched down over 2 octaves the responce gets slower and slower, so the lowest note takes about a second to swell up full volume. This may be giving a realistic feel, I've not played a genuine baritone. Air use is minimal though.

 

Graham

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Wow!

 

How do you play it out in sessions etc. does it need a lot of gear? I'm totally befuddled over all this technology but I like the idea of the sounds of different instruments and the ability to switchto accompaniment if there are a lot of treble instruments etc

Mike

 

Mike I replied to this by starting the thread about Midi links.

 

I've put a few more files on Sound Lantern

 

http://www.soundlantern.com/SoundPage.do?ToId=27848 Wakker G/D anglo, raised ends, closed fretwork.

 

http://www.soundlantern.com/SoundPage.do?ToId=27847 Aeola single action tenor

 

http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php...ost&id=2539 reed plate from tenor

http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php...ost&id=2540 reedplate from tenor

http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php...ost&id=1012 photo of F/C wheatstone and G/d jeffries for comparison, both moved on.

Graham

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  • 2 weeks later...
I have a Lachenal baritone in F/C. Actually, I've been told off on here for calling it that, because it's not strictly a baritone as there is no corresponding treble version an octave higher. But it's of baritone size and construction, with some huge reeds, and sounds quite different from my G/D treble although it's only a tone lower in pitch.

 

As Chris says, they're great for song accompaniment. It does demand a slightly different playing style, I find I have to play a bit more "oom-pah" than I normally do, to get those big low reeds kick-started.

 

Hi, have you posted a photo of this instrument anywhere, so we might see it?

 

Cheers

Dick

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  • 4 weeks later...

Here are two recordings. Same recording equipment, same concertina layout, same day, same person.

 

Tedrow Baritone G/D (Drop D): http://belegaer.com/SiBeagTedrow.mp3

Dipper Baritone G/D (Drop D): http://belegaer.com/SiBeagDipper.mp3

 

Given the quality of the instruments, any issues are the fault of the player.

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I have a Lachenal baritone in F/C. Actually, I've been told off on here for calling it that, because it's not strictly a baritone as there is no corresponding treble version an octave higher. But it's of baritone size and construction, with some huge reeds, and sounds quite different from my G/D treble although it's only a tone lower in pitch.

 

As Chris says, they're great for song accompaniment. It does demand a slightly different playing style, I find I have to play a bit more "oom-pah" than I normally do, to get those big low reeds kick-started.

 

I too have an F/C "baritone", but made by Wheatstone. It was previously owned by Steve Harrison. This also has some large reeds which sound very different from a Wheatstone G/D - much more mellow and rounded which give the impression of more than just the one tone difference in pitch.

 

Chas

 

I have to wonder how common the F/C tuning was.

Anyone have any thoughts on that?

 

My F/C Jeffries came to me from Lark in the Morning in August 1988. I came across the sales slip last summer just in time to be reminded that it indeed had been 20 years. A small celebration seemed to be in order.

 

The instrument doesn't require any special handling when playing, all the LH reeds respond very well, which is what I'd expect of Mr. Jeffries, I guess.

 

Jim

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I too have an F/C "baritone", but made by Wheatstone. It was previously owned by Steve Harrison. This also has some large reeds which sound very different from a Wheatstone G/D - much more mellow and rounded which give the impression of more than just the one tone difference in pitch.

Chas

My F/C Jeffries came to me from Lark in the Morning in August 1988. I came across the sales slip last summer just in time to be reminded that it indeed had been 20 years. A small celebration seemed to be in order.

Jim

Have either of you lucky F/C owners posted YouTubes or even sound files of your Concertinas in action, so that those less fortunate might get a chance to hear their sound?

 

If so, please post links .... Ta.

 

Cheers

Dick

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OK, just for you, here's my version of "Withered and Died", by the wonderful Richard Thompson:

 

Withered___Died_no_guitar.mp3

 

This is also relevant to the "singing and playing" thread. The main accompaniment is on a Lachenal F/C baritone anglo, with a Crabb C/G anglo coming in later (played in F, which is also discussed in the other thread).

 

I'm not entirely happy with the mix, which doesn't quite bring out the really low F on the baritone, but I hope it's enough to give an idea.

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I have to wonder how common the F/C tuning was.

I have wondered that myself.........and also why . I have been told by one Board member who is very knowledgable that there was no tradition of it being used for traditional/folk singing ( which is where it is mostlly useful for now.)

I have seen four Jeffries F/C ........... I own one now. In the recent past I had the fortune of Geoff Crabb making me one that had a glorious low Crabb-like sound. I find I mainly play a 38 key instrument now so reluctanly sold it to make way for the Jeffries. Mine is retuned down from a G/D and is a standard 30/38 key size...............another one I have seen is original F/C reeds, according to the stamps.

Colin Dipper told me he has seen 10 or so over the years.

Cheers Robin

Edited by Robin Harrison
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