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1909 Wheatstone Linota


AlanEgan
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Hi all,

 

I'm afraid that as a poor student I have no option but to sell my beloved wheatsone. She is number 24091 and is a top class concertina. One of the best wheatstones I have played. She has a beautiful sweet tone and very responsive action. She is in Eb so C#/G#. I would much rather sell my suttner but I need it for teaching in D. :( This is a great concertina and I really want her to go to a good home where she will be played and not just seen of as an investment. This is why I am letting ye know here before hitting ebay.

 

I have pics and some sound files. Email me for more info etc... eganalan@gmail.com

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Hi all,

 

.......................She is in Eb so C#/G#. ....................................

 

... eganalan@gmail.com

 

Wouldn't Eb translate to a D#. By Eb do you mean the middle row (Eb/Bflat) or the bottom row as in Ab/Eb? I'm not too sure what keys a person would be getting in they purchased this from you.

 

It would be helpful to you as the seller and to the potential buyers of c.net or ebay to have a much better and more accurate description if you are serious about selling this.

 

Steve

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I'm just speculating, but this has come up before. I've known Irish anglo players to describe their cross fingering of a C/G anglo to play in D as "playing in D." If that were the case here, the entire instrument is tuned a semitone higher than a C/G, giving a box that "plays in Eb." There are flutes in Eb etc. so it is not unheard of there.

 

Ken

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Hi all,

 

.......................She is in Eb so C#/G#. ....................................

 

... eganalan@gmail.com

Wouldn't Eb translate to a D#. By Eb do you mean the middle row (Eb/Bflat) or the bottom row as in Ab/Eb? I'm not too sure what keys a person would be getting in they purchased this from you.

 

It would be helpful to you as the seller and to the potential buyers of c.net or ebay to have a much better and more accurate description if you are serious about selling this.

Steve

The description is accurate if you know the context. Some Irish players refer to C#/G# boxes as 'Eb' boxes because they are suited to playing with Eb instruments (some flutes, for example) or playing in sessions where instruments are tuned up half a step--so D tunes come out in Eb.

 

The liner notes to Edel Fox's CD, for example, say she is playing an Eb concertina. It is a C#/G# instrument.

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Wouldn't Eb translate to a D#. By Eb do you mean the middle row (Eb/Bflat) or the bottom row as in Ab/Eb? I'm not too sure what keys a person would be getting in they purchased this from you.

 

It would be helpful to you as the seller and to the potential buyers of c.net or ebay to have a much better and more accurate description if you are serious about selling this.

 

Steve

 

Thanks Steve,

 

As I said I want her to go to a good home where she will be played. So any "potential buyers" should know what I was talking about. ;)

 

Alan

Edited by skinsegan
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Thanks Steve,

 

As I said I want her to go to a good home where she will be played. So any "potential buyers" should know what I was talking about. ;)

 

Alan

 

You are welcome Alan and thanks to Ken and Michael for clarifying the keys for me. I can now refer to my C/G concertina as being played in the key of D.

 

It is nice to learn something new this late in the year.

 

Steve

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You are welcome Alan and thanks to Ken and Michael for clarifying the keys for me. I can now refer to my C/G concertina as being played in the key of D.

 

It is nice to learn something new this late in the year.

 

Steve

 

It must be an Irish thing, C/G is referred to as D, C#/G# is Eb, Bb/F is C. The key is usally the note you get when you play D button on the concertina. (middle row, middle button, left hand on a standard 30 key concertina)

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Thanks Steve,

 

As I said I want her to go to a good home where she will be played. So any "potential buyers" should know what I was talking about. ;)

 

Alan

 

You are welcome Alan and thanks to Ken and Michael for clarifying the keys for me. I can now refer to my C/G concertina as being played in the key of D.

 

It is nice to learn something new this late in the year.

 

Steve

 

well, steve, don't you often play your C/G concertinas in the key of D? but... i guess, most who have a C#/G# concertina would be playing in Eb and Ab. so... i guess, to be accurate, instead of an Eb concertina, i guess we could call it a Eb/Ab concertina, :lol:

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well, steve, don't you often play your C/G concertinas in the key of D? but... i guess, most who have a C#/G# concertina would be playing in Eb and Ab. so... i guess, to be accurate, instead of an Eb concertina, i guess we could call it a Eb/Ab concertina, :lol:

 

Well, David, I also play my C/G concertina in the Keys of C major, D minor (dorian and aeolian), E minor (dorian and aeolian), F, Bflat, G major and minor, A major and minor (dorian and aeolian) and B minor (aeolian). So, you tell me as to what key or keys I should refererence when refering to my concertina?

 

Now, this topic really gives thought to a myriad of other instruments and the reference of their diatonic scale and key as opposed to their commonly played key. How do I decide what key(s) my harmonicas are. I have the Hohner XB 40's which allows me to play in one position producing different keys. An "A" harmonica can be played in the first position as A major, A dorian, A aeolian or I could play in B dorian and so according to the line of thought in this thread I could refer to the key of my A harp as being in B minor.

 

Food for thought?

 

Steve

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The whole idea of saying that a chromatic instrument is "in" a particular key is inherently problematic but not uncommon. For example, a Chemnitzer concertina with "home" rows in G and A is referred to in the Chemnitzer world as being in C, but also as being in "5 press A". And I got into an argument with my trombone-playing son not long ago about whether the trombone is in C (as he said) or Bb (as I said). He did some reading and decided that I was right, but it's not a straightforward question.

 

Daniel

 

well, steve, don't you often play your C/G concertinas in the key of D? but... i guess, most who have a C#/G# concertina would be playing in Eb and Ab. so... i guess, to be accurate, instead of an Eb concertina, i guess we could call it a Eb/Ab concertina, :lol:

 

Well, David, I also play my C/G concertina in the Keys of C major, D minor (dorian and aeolian), E minor (dorian and aeolian), F, Bflat, G major and minor, A major and minor (dorian and aeolian) and B minor (aeolian). So, you tell me as to what key or keys I should refererence when refering to my concertina?

 

Now, this topic really gives thought to a myriad of other instruments and the reference of their diatonic scale and key as opposed to their commonly played key. How do I decide what key(s) my harmonicas are. I have the Hohner XB 40's which allows me to play in one position producing different keys. An "A" harmonica can be played in the first position as A major, A dorian, A aeolian or I could play in B dorian and so according to the line of thought in this thread I could refer to the key of my A harp as being in B minor.

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