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flight of the bumblebee


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i'm wondering if anyone has ever successfully played the flight of the bumblebee on the anglo. i've heard of it being done on the english concertina, but have never even heard mention of anyone who has ever done it on the anglo.

 

that being said, does anyone have any chromatic fingering patterns they use when playing chromatic runs on the anglo concertina? i have one worked out that i really like, but i was wondering how other people might approach it.

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i'm wondering if anyone has ever successfully played the flight of the bumblebee on the anglo. i've heard of it being done on the english concertina, but have never even heard mention of anyone who has ever done it on the anglo.

 

that being said, does anyone have any chromatic fingering patterns they use when playing chromatic runs on the anglo concertina? i have one worked out that i really like, but i was wondering how other people might approach it.

Interesting question, David.

 

One C.net member was certainly working on this piece, years ago. I don't know how close to the "correct" tempo he got it. Sadly; due to health problems, he is no longer playing regularly (in fact; hardly at all). He sent me the music to FOTBB a couple of years ago. I would describe it as "a good listening tune". Whether anyone could play it in 66.56 seconds, I doubt (World Record, on violin).

 

I know that another C.net member does play some chromatic runs. Whether they would be sufficient to cover FOTBB, I don't know, but I'm sure that she will make a comment if she reads this thread.

 

Regards,

Peter.

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Could someone define chromatic run for me, please?

A run is a fast ascending or descending sequence of notes, separated mostly by intervals of semitones and tones, usually comprising a portion of a scale. When someone says that it is a chromatic run, they would usually mean that the run is made from an extract from the chromatic scale, ie, all the intervals are all semitones.

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Could someone define chromatic run for me, please?

A run is a fast ascending or descending sequence of notes, separated mostly by intervals of semitones and tones, usually comprising a portion of a scale. When someone says that it is a chromatic run, they would usually mean that the run is made from an extract from the chromatic scale, ie, all the intervals are all semitones.

 

Like the run in say Hark the Herald Angels Sing?

 

Alan

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Could someone define chromatic run for me, please?

A run is a fast ascending or descending sequence of notes, separated mostly by intervals of semitones and tones, usually comprising a portion of a scale. When someone says that it is a chromatic run, they would usually mean that the run is made from an extract from the chromatic scale, ie, all the intervals are all semitones.

 

Like the run in say Hark the Herald Angels Sing?

 

Alan

 

not really in the sense we're talking about it.

 

 

at 0:43 and 0:44, the tear drop sounding things might be called a run. from 1:46 to 2:05 there are a lot of runs which are slurred. it is hard to find an example on the fly, but it is a very common thing in classical music. they are usually very fleeting, very fast, and can be difficult to do.

 

as far as anglo concertina goes, it is clearly a very difficult thing to do! not just technically speaking (i dont know if you can argue that a chromatic scale on a piano is easier, technically), but because no one else seems to be doing them, you have to figure them out for yourself. if i asked you to play a chromatic scale on the piano, it would be difficult, but if you were committed to the piano, you would work it out, because you would know that there are thousands upon thousands of people in the world who can play a quick, effortless, and "musical" chromatic scale on the piano. it's hard to convince yourself to do it (or that it's possible) on the anglo, because there are so very few, if any, who can do it.

 

anyone else--is that a good example? i cant think of a better example in context.

Edited by david_boveri
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Could someone define chromatic run for me, please?

A run is a fast ascending or descending sequence of notes, separated mostly by intervals of semitones and tones, usually comprising a portion of a scale. When someone says that it is a chromatic run, they would usually mean that the run is made from an extract from the chromatic scale, ie, all the intervals are all semitones.

 

Like the run in say Hark the Herald Angels Sing?

 

Alan

The last rising scale in

is a chromatic run; in effect he goes the longest possible direct way home, using every available flat or sharp on the way without going back on himself.

 

(seemed an appropriate example!)

 

Editted to add; I wouldn't have said that speed was a necessary part of the definition of a run; I'd say it was just a part of the music that happened to fall into a scale of a few or more notes.

Edited by Dirge
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anyone else--is that a good example? i cant think of a better example in context.

The immediately recognizable march "Entrance of the Gladiators" is often used as generic "circus music." It is filled with chromatic runs, and was actually originally called "Grande Marche Chromatique." Here's a small excerpt with an obvious rising chromatic run near the very end:

 

http://www.JeffLeff.com/misc/CircusMarch.mid

 

I wouldn't have said that speed was a necessary part of the definition of a run; I'd say it was just a part of the music that happened to fall into a scale of a few or more notes.

I agree -- bass runs in particular are often relatively slow.

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Could someone define chromatic run for me, please?

A run is a fast ascending or descending sequence of notes, separated mostly by intervals of semitones and tones, usually comprising a portion of a scale. When someone says that it is a chromatic run, they would usually mean that the run is made from an extract from the chromatic scale, ie, all the intervals are all semitones.

 

Like the run in say Hark the Herald Angels Sing?

 

Alan

The last rising scale in

is a chromatic run; in effect he goes the longest possible direct way home, using every available flat or sharp on the way without going back on himself.

 

(seemed an appropriate example!)

 

Editted to add; I wouldn't have said that speed was a necessary part of the definition of a run; I'd say it was just a part of the music that happened to fall into a scale of a few or more notes.

 

i would agree that speed is not necessary for something to be considered a run. when i use the term (which is loose), i'm referring to notes that are considered a coherent whole in one direction. especially in art pieces, you can play these as slow or fast as you would like. often times, they can be written as sixteen notes in a beat--time can often be suspended in these cases, and the run may go on for what would be several beats. i'm sure there are technical terms differentiating all these different sorts of runs that we are pointing out!

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  • 2 weeks later...
Out of curiosity, I checked out the sheet music from the Seattle Public Library, and am working on it. I'll let you all know if I succeed ...

 

Until then, here's a song of mine that features a few chromatic runs:

 

Beecher's Bibles

 

Best!

Steven

 

thanks for sharing!

 

let us know how you get along on the piece.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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