Jump to content

old postcards


Recommended Posts

This site is a collection of 387 musically-themed postcards, many of which contain squeezeboxes. Here are 2 and links to 4 more. There are several more scattered throughout the collection.

 

47589904_Chhnn-M.jpg

Not a concertina, perhaps, but strange and wonderful nonetheless.

 

Probably designed to encourage melodeon owners to dump their instruments in the nearest waterway. :lol:

 

Nah, it's the squeezebox version of Schubert's Trout Quintet and they are waiting for the other three to turn up. ;)

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Third "Geo Leonard" not sure who he is ,anyone know?

Al

 

 

Interesting, Alan. He looks a lot like George Young, the last image I posted up above, also seen here in another image.

In fact, looking at the collection I referenced, here’s the same picture, with a different name!

47591815_9hfUY-M.jpg

47591770_iVVYD-M.jpg

47591790_SSpog-M.jpg

 

When I first found these, I searched for George Young and found a post on Richard Carlin’s blog complaining that there were lots of extant postcards of George Young, but no record of any performance by him. However, in that same search, there was a review of a performance by him where the audience persuaded him to do an encore.

source

 

Monday 21 August 1911.

 

Mark Sheridan. One of the B'hoys.

Lily Burnard. Burlesque Actress.

Frank Couch. Comedian.

The Eight Empire Girls. Vocalists and Dancers.

The Arthur Lloyd Trio. Little Charlie.

Ouida Macdermott. Vocalist.

The Martialo Trio. Jugglers.

George Young. The Blind Musician.

 

Hull Daily News 22/08/1911.

 

Although not a big-letter turn, George Young blind musician and concertina soloist was rewarded last night by an outburst of applause that would gratify any star and although the scene was changed for the succeeding turn, the audience insisted upon a recall which was eventually given.

 

So why two names? Is one his real name and the other a stage name, do you think?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Third "Geo Leonard" not sure who he is ,anyone know?

Al

 

 

Interesting, Alan. He looks a lot like George Young, the last image I posted up above, also seen here in another image.

In fact, looking at the collection I referenced, here’s the same picture, with a different name!

47591815_9hfUY-M.jpg

47591770_iVVYD-M.jpg

47591790_SSpog-M.jpg

 

When I first found these, I searched for George Young and found a post on Richard Carlin’s blog complaining that there were lots of extant postcards of George Young, but no record of any performance by him. However, in that same search, there was a review of a performance by him where the audience persuaded him to do an encore.

source

 

Monday 21 August 1911.

 

Mark Sheridan. One of the B'hoys.

Lily Burnard. Burlesque Actress.

Frank Couch. Comedian.

The Eight Empire Girls. Vocalists and Dancers.

The Arthur Lloyd Trio. Little Charlie.

Ouida Macdermott. Vocalist.

The Martialo Trio. Jugglers.

George Young. The Blind Musician.

 

Hull Daily News 22/08/1911.

 

Although not a big-letter turn, George Young blind musician and concertina soloist was rewarded last night by an outburst of applause that would gratify any star and although the scene was changed for the succeeding turn, the audience insisted upon a recall which was eventually given.

 

So why two names? Is one his real name and the other a stage name, do you think?

He is certainly the same player

I cannot date the card although a stamp collector may from the postage info - Half Penny Stamp Green Postage stamped SP 10 then underneath 10

May be 1910.

If his Stage name was already being used he may have had to change it,or perhaps decided to use his Wife's Surname as did Tommy Elliott.

Thanks for the information ,very interesting.

Anyone seen the Salvation Army one before ?

Al

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So why two names? Is one his real name and the other a stage name, do you think?

 

No clue, Dirge. I did find a different performance involving George Young.

 

Empire Palace vaudeville season,

Edinburgh, June 1911, with

Fred Kitchen, the Eight Germania Girls,

Fatmah Diard, and

Pip Powell and Katie Vesey et al

 

Fatmah Diard (fl. early 20th Century),

American contralto

 

'EMPIRE SEASON AT THE THEATRE-ROYAL.

'Both performances at the Theatre-Royal were well attended last night when the second week of the Empire Palace vaudeville season was entered upon. The principal item on the programme was a ketch entitled ''Persevering Potts,'' presented by Mr Henry Darnley's company. The piece has been written to amuse, and with Mr Fred Kitchen, the well-known comedian, in the principal part, that quality is not lacking. He had the assistance of a large company, all of whom did their best to make the production a success, and the comedy was beautifully staged. The Eight Germania Girls gave an interesting performance. It was chiefly military in character. The company had been well drilled, and their evolutions, which were extremely graceful, were smartly executed. In addition they sang nicely. Miss Fatmah Diard, an American soprano, charmed the audience with her singing, her rendering of ''Scenes that are brightest,'' being exceptionally good. A musical comedy by Mr Pip Powell and Miss Katie Vesey was greatly enjoyed. Both are smart dancers, and the lady sings well. Mr Adam Tomlinson, a Tyneside comedian, proved himself a first-class entertainer. His stories were excellent, and the audience thoroughly endorsed his statement that he was ''not a bad turn.'' A blind musician, Mr George Young, is a master of the concertina. Miss Felo Curran, a good singer and clever dander; and Mr Torbay gave an amusing silhouette exhibition.'

(The Scotsman, Edinburgh, Scotland, Tuesday, 6 June 1911, p. 10e)

 

Oddly enough, there's another sighting of a younger, sighted George Young, who plays the concertina as a wartime signal.

 

This view from Room 217 in the Senior British Officers' Quarters in the theatre block was painted by Major W.F. Anderson in the winter of 1941- 2. It shows roughly the view that Douglas Bader, would have had of the sentry patrolling the outer courtyard during the the escape by Reid, Stephens, Littledale and Wardle on October 14th 1942 which Pat Reid describes in the Colditz Story. Music was used for signalling to the escape party - who could not see the sentry themselves - and the sentry had to become accustomed to it beforehand. For several days prior to the escape, music practices were arranged in the evenings. Anderson describes these as follows:

"The oboe reeds are also just in time - the other ones had really practically breathed their last and the new ones produce at least twice the noise with half the effort. George Young and I do some combined operations with him on the piano, which is quite fun - also now and then in our room with him on the harmonica (sic) - this clears the room in a very short while.”

On the evening in question Bader watched the sentry and acted as conductor, Anderson played the oboe and Colonel George Young played the concertina. When the players were silent it meant that the sentry was in a suitable position for the escapers to cross his path without being seen. The escape was successful.

 

italics mine.

 

Jody, the website in my original post very much encourages you to share the images. They even provide mechanisms for linking or copying at different resolutions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Pamela,I am pleased you enjoyed them and have joined me in my hobby.

I have had to reduce the size of the pictures as it has taken up all my available space.

Al

 

Al

 

Well I traveled to this wonderful antique shop that has a room full of old postcards and photos. Needless to say, no concertina themed cards. Actually I did not see any cards that were themed musical. But I will keep looking!

 

Pam

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Pamela,I am pleased you enjoyed them and have joined me in my hobby.

I have had to reduce the size of the pictures as it has taken up all my available space.

Al

 

Al

 

Well I traveled to this wonderful antique shop that has a room full of old postcards and photos. Needless to say, no concertina themed cards. Actually I did not see any cards that were themed musical. But I will keep looking!

 

Pam

Pamela just keep looking and you will find them.Have a look at the Music Hall ,theatre,bands novelty sections.The post card of Raphael that I have seen but I do not own has only him in the photograph with no concertina.You have more chance of finding him being an American Music Hall favourite than over here where he was unknown.Old theatre programme sellers sometimes feature the old artists.I have just picked up two of the Musical Elliotts.

Very time consuming, but good fun.

Al

Link to comment
Share on other sites

47589904_Chhnn-M.jpg

Not a concertina, perhaps, but strange and wonderful nonetheless.

Probably designed to encourage melodeon owners to dump their instruments in the nearest waterway. :lol:

No, that's what happened after someone dumped their melodeon in the river! :lol:

 

 

This fish (maybe he was a roach or a carp) was swimmintg around under the lily pads when the surface was broken by a shattering of the light and a strange convoluted instrument sank down. He took it between his fins and pulled it apart, sucking many small fry and tadpoles into the air holes ( as the gauze had been removed for greater volume)

 

When he pushed it together out came mangled fishy bits.

 

'Why did you do that?' the mother fishies bubbled at him.

 

Answers on a postcard to Uncle Mike's piscatorial puzzles or on this thread if it's easier. My Answer in next week's issue.

 

 

 

'I fancied fish fries in chips and munchy peers'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...