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tutors/books/dvds etc


polutropos
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As a complete new comer to the concertina I've been looking at various tutor books and dvd's. In fact my Rochelle is still on order, so all I can do is listen and read and prepare for the big day! It's difficult to assess what will be the most useful tutor. Bertram Levy is well regarded but I'm finding that the sound I most enjoy is Irish so I want to learn that first. I haven't found much by way of user reviews on Frank Edgley's books but this one looks ideal:

 

"The Anglo Concertina, Handbook of Tunes and Methods for Irish Traditional Music" by Frank Edgley

Concertina Tutor Workbook & CD

The purpose of this tutor is to provide the beginning or aspiring anglo concertina player with resources which can be used with or without an instructor to become a competent player. This book will assist in this endeavour, and make sense of the keyboard patterns, concertina techniques, and embellishments. The accompanying CD further clarifies the lessons covered in the workbook. This tutor includes written music and lessons for 35 Irish tunes.

 

Is anyone familiar with this or can anyone offer advice or recommendations in this area of book/cd/dvd tutors. I know it's all personal but it would be helpful. Many thanks.

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Is anyone familiar with this or can anyone offer advice or recommendations in this area of book/cd/dvd tutors. I know it's all personal but it would be helpful. Many thanks.

I think it's a great resource - well done! The Button Box also has several more Irish concertina tutors (with descriptions).

 

-- Rich --

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Frank Edgley also has a nice DVD out.

 

For Irish styles I'd recommend John William's DVD and Mick Bramich's book and CD pub by Dave Mallinson , here in Yorkshire

 

I'd also listen to lots of concertina players and other instrumentalists , particularly source musicians like Pady Murphy, Tommy McCarthy etc. The Clare set of CDsfrom Free Reed records is great .

 

I find if I use Google I can usually find a direct source or distributor. Of course all the links on conc.net to YouTube etc are invaluable

 

All the best

Mike

 

Practice makes perfect!

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I have Frank's book and CD and I found them to be great. However, Frank plays predominantly on the inside row as in the original style of Chris Droney and if you were to follow it completely that is the style you would favour. That would not neccessarily be a bad thing but there are other styles/systems which make more use of the middle row and give you the options to make a tune sound different and I feel it might be advantageous to keep your options open on those as well.The Williams and Bramitch books/CDs/DVDs are good also and if the three were used you would give yourself a wide number of options. It might also be useful to use this time to see if there is a concertina player who's style you are attracted to and work from there.When I started I decided not to commit myself to one system too soon and to chose instead to try to keep my options open until I was familiar with how all the different sounds are made.But there is no beating scales and more scales, using all the different options and in this way, you will be able to adapt to any style.If you were to listen to say Mary McNamara and Kitty Hayes and compare those styles to say Tim Collins, Noel Hill and Micheál O'Raghallaigh you will hear how different systems are used to get different sounds. Best wishes with it.

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Good advice from Larryo.

 

I also forgot to mention the CDRom by Niall Vallely (see Button Box list) which is an excellent teaching aid once you get your head round the interactive system. I think it has all you'd need to get going, a complete resource and one I wish had been available when I was young. If we could have an online way of adding to it like wickipedia , under the guidance of a wise magus, maybe this could be the next generation of information sharing.

 

There are some good tutorials on YouTube

Mike

Edited by michael sam wild
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Thanks for all your great advice and a few new names for concertina players I've not yet heard. Though actually I find there to be some great stuff on youtube, etc. I was aware of the Niall Vallely cdrom but to be honest, though it is probably a useful aid, I don't like his sound (what I've heard) for some reason it feels hurried, so it kind of discourages me. The idea of a wiki + youtube teaching resource sounds fantastic. But not anything I'm ready to contribute towards! There is a reasonable if long winded 18 part youtube beginners Guide to EC by 'Martyn' but nothing comparable for Anglo.

 

At first I too was thinking of keeping my options open for learning but then realising I was drawn to a particular sound/style I thought it a good idea to follow my heart rather than studying areas that don't yet inspire me (not that I rule anything out) - hopefully that'll keep me buoyant when the hard work sets in after the novelty of a new instrument fades. My main reason for wanting a tutor book/dvd is to plan out for myself an organised approach to learning, to get to grips with what I need to do so that I avoid desultory casual efforts that are kind of 'fun' but unprogressive, if that makes sense. Anyway I appreciate all your comments and the music. Cheers.

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