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OT: the weather


LDT
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No.

 

There was a Canal Convention here in 2006. Four narrow boats came over from England to take part.

 

I joined up with them when they came past where I live. Played on board as they went through a couple of locks.

 

It took them several month's to complete the trip. The Dalsland canal is quite long. 60 odd miles. I think. Then there was the Göta canal back and forth from Gothenborg as well. Another 60 odd miles. And of course they had to navigate part of the lake Vanern - which is Europe's third largest.

One of the boats had no engine. It was however, full of promotional "London Pride". :o They didn't take any back with them.

 

post-1882-1228661905_thumb.jpg post-1882-1228661846_thumb.jpg

 

I've played my Anglo in a narrow boat!

We were on the trip from Chirk in Wales to Chester in England and back, a whole gang of us in two boats. Tunnels, aqueducts, cuttings, embankments - just like a railway, only more leisurely - and then all those ancient, self-service locks!

I love canal boating - I've done it on holiday twice. The other time was on the "Warwick Ring", a round trip of a week. On our last night, we moored opposite the Cape of Good Hope - a canalside pub in Warwick - on their session night.

 

And the only R/C model I've ever built just happens to be a 1920s steam narrow boat in 1/24th scale :rolleyes:

 

By the way, the boats without engines are called "butties", and in the last days of commercial canal shipping they worked together in pairs with "motor boats". Both had short masts for attaching a horse towing-rope.

 

I would be interested to hear how those narrow boats got to Sweden. Normally, they aren't even allowed on rivers without special equipment, let alone the open sea! :o

 

Cheers,

John

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I would be interested to hear how those narrow boats got to Sweden. Normally, they aren't even allowed on rivers without special equipment, let alone the open sea! :o

 

Cheers,

John

 

They were transported by a freighter from London to Gothenborg. Being lifted onto the deck. Then craned onto the Görta Rver in Gotheborg where the sea meet the river.

 

They had to wait for a calm day to navigate the Lake Värnern.

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They were transported by a freighter from London to Gothenborg. Being lifted onto the deck. Then craned onto the Görta Rver in Gotheborg where the sea meet the river.

 

They had to wait for a calm day to navigate the Lake Värnern.

 

Aha! I thought so!

 

The English canal system is very narrow, and most of the canals are completely artificial, i.e. they include no lakes or wide rivers with strong currents. So the narrow boats have no anchors (only iron spikes to hammer into the bank) or navigation lights (only single headlamps for use in tunnels).

 

Cheers,

John

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Snowed about a foot night before last, and it's -5C, a rare event here on Hornby Island, considered a "modified Mediterranean climate". However, today the sun is brilliant, the war office is out x-country skiing, and I'm going to practice, practice, practice....

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Snowed about a foot night before last, and it's -5C, a rare event here on Hornby Island, considered a "modified Mediterranean climate". However, today the sun is brilliant, the war office is out x-country skiing, and I'm going to practice, practice, practice....

 

Well I went up to Norway(200km.) for a Christmas Carrol Gig on Friday in a snow storm. Came back on Sunday and all the snow has gone.

 

So I'm out on the golf course tomorrow Wealding a seven iron, etc. :P

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Do you people live inside a fridge or something?

Here's a sample of our English winter weather, and gives a clue as to why the Romans eventually went home:

 

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=EmUcm55S3vg&...re=channel_page

 

It puts me in mind of The Phantom Raspberry Blower of Old London Town.

 

Nice one Peter.

That took me back to LNER, Liverpool Street to Hoe Street, Walthamstow line in the '50's.

 

That was why we pushed small boys up them chimneys.

 

Reminded me also of song. " Sweep Chimney Sweep"

 

Imagine a world 400 years ago where children were used as chimney sweeps. The pay was low, it was a dirty trade and there was little reward for the men who did the job and even less for children.

 

Medway’s annual Sweeps Festival recreates the joy and laughter enjoyed by the chimney sweeps at their traditional holiday: the one time of the year the sweeps could leave the soot behind and have some fun. The sweeps’ holiday was traditionally held on 1 May each year. Locally, they used to mark the occasion by staging a procession through the streets of Rochester.

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this was a little while ago http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=OI1mMv4za_8

filmed while waiting for a bus

Ah ....... "England's green and pleasant land". I hope you were safely under cover and away from the vehicle spray.

Actually I was totally soaked form getting to the bus shelter so it didn't make much difference.

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Do you people live inside a fridge or something?

Here's a sample of our English winter weather, and gives a clue as to why the Romans eventually went home:

 

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=EmUcm55S3vg&...re=channel_page

 

It puts me in mind of The Phantom Raspberry Blower of Old London Town.

 

Please note that the Romans never even tried to take over Ireland :P

 

London fog? Pah! Belfast in the mid-'60s was the place for fog. Coal-burning fires and sea-fog coming in from the North Channel gave me one of my most mystic experiences on a November evening on the River Lagan. I was in a single-seater rowing skiff (don't ask me why!) and with the fog and the darkness I could see neither the ends of the boat nor the blades of my sculls. The water at my side was an invisible black. It was like being suspended between Heaven and Earth. I knew the river intimately - spent at least 2 hours a day rowing up and down it - but I could only find my way by feeling for the bank with my scull blade, and shot the bridges with the aid of the vague yellow patches in the grey nothingness that were the street lamps over the piers of the bridges. I could hear the arches of the bridges, but could not see them.

 

Fog? Either you like it or you don't. At least it keeps you safe from Romans ... :lol:

 

Cheers,

John

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Do you people live inside a fridge or something?

Here's a sample of our English winter weather, and gives a clue as to why the Romans eventually went home:

 

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=EmUcm55S3vg&...re=channel_page

 

It puts me in mind of The Phantom Raspberry Blower of Old London Town.

 

Please note that the Romans never even tried to take over Ireland :P

 

London fog? Pah! Belfast in the mid-'60s was the place for fog. Coal-burning fires and sea-fog coming in from the North Channel gave me one of my most mystic experiences on a November evening on the River Lagan. I was in a single-seater rowing skiff (don't ask me why!) and with the fog and the darkness I could see neither the ends of the boat nor the blades of my sculls. The water at my side was an invisible black. It was like being suspended between Heaven and Earth. I knew the river intimately - spent at least 2 hours a day rowing up and down it - but I could only find my way by feeling for the bank with my scull blade, and shot the bridges with the aid of the vague yellow patches in the grey nothingness that were the street lamps over the piers of the bridges. I could hear the arches of the bridges, but could not see them.

 

Now all we need is Four Yorkshiremen to join in on this thread! :lol:

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  • 3 weeks later...
pretty!!!!hope to see nz some day.

 

 

Yes me too.

 

See my world tour plans on Mudcat Forum.

 

Errr. Temp here in Sweden the other day was -26 !

 

Yesterday it was +2

 

Swings and Roundabouts

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Look, here's a nice warm pic of Napier today to remind you of summer.

 

Those aren't the municipal Xmas trees; they're Norfolk Island pines. They grow well here.

Wow! And they let English people come and live there?

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