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Morse on ebay


Snorre
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Hi,

any opinions on this: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...em=190270255227 ?

 

I am currently playing a Stagi C/G 30-button, which, in my repairwoman's opinion is not worth spending any money on.

I am very much a beginner, but as I am spending an alarming amount of time practicing the concertina, rather than my main instrument, the fiddle, I have considered moving up in the world, in regards to quality and playability. I have never heard the Morse, but i presume it has the "squeky" sound of a concertina, rather than the broader, accordianish sound of my first tina, a 1950s Frontalini C/G 20btn.

 

This seems like a good beginners instrument that will carry long into intermediate, and if the price (and seller) is right, I just might go for it.

 

I would however like to hear the opinions of those that have played before me :lol:

 

Thanks.

 

Snorre

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Hi Snorre and welcome

 

These may be good enough on a cmputer to give you a sample of the sounds.

 

Or look through this thread for comparisons: http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php...ost&p=68897

 

I have a Morse Albion (English) that I like a lot. It will live longer than me. I don't think it would be a wrong choice, in fact it would be an excellent choice.

 

Thanks :)

Leo

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Hi,

any opinions on this: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...em=190270255227 ?

 

I am currently playing a Stagi C/G 30-button, which, in my repairwoman's opinion is not worth spending any money on.

I am very much a beginner, but as I am spending an alarming amount of time practicing the concertina, rather than my main instrument, the fiddle, I have considered moving up in the world, in regards to quality and playability. I have never heard the Morse, but i presume it has the "squeky" sound of a concertina, rather than the broader, accordianish sound of my first tina, a 1950s Frontalini C/G 20btn.

 

This seems like a good beginners instrument that will carry long into intermediate, and if the price (and seller) is right, I just might go for it.

 

I would however like to hear the opinions of those that have played before me :lol:

 

Thanks.

 

Snorre

 

Snorre,

This Morse would definately be an instrument that you could "grow into". Which is to say, that as your skills improve this particular instrument would serve you very nicely.

My very first concertina was a 30-button, C/G, Stagi. Moderate action and crappy sounding reeds. (when compared to a Lachenal or Wheatstone) Triplets were impossible to play on it, fast runs blurred together, buttons stuck. It was a good beginner, but I outgrew it within a year. You'll be playing this Morse for decades and she'll never short-change you on quality, nor it's abilities. The grossly worn finish seems to be the only short-coming. (A mere disassembly, sanding and touch-up will remedy that!)

Keep your Stagi for the odd parts, it might provide, (parts can be VERY hard to come by) or pass it on to another beginner. I will warn you that I may well be bidding on this one too! (Consider that an endorsement (my high opinion) of it's quality! LOL) For me, this one wouldn't be for resale, it would be one of my "players"; ie, a personal instrument. My best regards, KerryF

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This seems like a good beginners instrument that will carry long into intermediate, and if the price (and seller) is right, I just might go for it.

I remember that box coming through our store a couple of months ago. Despite the extreme wear on the outside near the keys (the person must have played it a LOT and has long fingernails?), the box was in very good shape. We went through it anyway to make sure that it was in prime shape for resale. We have a similar used one (but without the worn bits) on our shelves for half again as much, and they cost almost twice new. These are instruments that will last long into intermediate level and beyond (even pros play our boxes).

 

-- Rich --

THE BUTTON BOX

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This seems like a good beginners instrument that will carry long into intermediate, and if the price (and seller) is right, I just might go for it.

We have a similar used one (but without the worn bits) on our shelves for half again as much, and they cost almost twice new.

Rich, have you got a direct link to the one on the shelf? This thread just might end up in a new concertina for me, either way :lol:

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Rich, have you got a direct link to the one on the shelf? This thread just might end up in a new concertina for me, either way :lol:

It's at the top of the list here but now that I look at that page I see that someone has their finger on it. Used Morses go quickly! If you're interested in that one you should e-mail or call us to be notified if the customer decides not to take it.

 

-- Rich --

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the wear on the instrument in these photos is quite off-putting, but i must say that i have a black morse ceili of 3-4 years in age that has always been kept in its case when not in play, and it has a disappointing amount of wear for an instrument in this price range. not the amount of wear visible here, but a disappointing amount. the black finish comes off around the buttons and at the hexagon angles......it is not a matter of fingernails or hard use, and it's too bad. i find that alternative cherry color noxious, and really like the black, but it wears....i think the price is a bit high for a concertina this cosmetically worn, relative to the price of a new one, but in used-market terms, mr. morse may be right about it being in line with used price for this age & playing (as opposed to cosmetic) condition....

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the wear on the instrument in these photos is quite off-putting, but i must say that i have a black morse ceili of 3-4 years in age that has always been kept in its case when not in play, and it has a disappointing amount of wear

While we weren't aware of any durability problems with the black finish back then, we have changed finishers and products which now yield a considerably more durable finish. I'm not sure of the exact date of switch-over (I'd have to look the serial numbers up).

 

i find that alternative cherry color noxious

We've also gone to birch for our black ones so if anyone does go through the black with one of those at least it will be a neutral color wood. Also, the current finish is a deeply penetrating stain which makes the transition not as abrupt. Hopefully if anyone wears through this version it will be only marginally noticable - like wearing through some Wheatstone models which appear to be ebony and are really black-stained maple.

 

in used-market terms, mr. morse may be right about it being in line with used price for this age & playing (as opposed to cosmetic) condition....

I remember us considering repairing the worn spots on that box or outright replacing the ends with some new ones. Ultimately we decided that either way it wouldn't affect its playability but only serve to increase it's price so we left it as is. If whoever buys it wants to make it prettier, they can always blacken the worn spots or send it back to us to have new ones fitted on it.

 

-- Rich --

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Despite the extreme wear on the outside near the keys (the person must have played it a LOT and has long fingernails?)

HEY!

That was my Morse and I played it a lot. But contrary to what Rich thinks I don't have long fingernails. I work in forestry and have hardly any fingernails at all, in fact I'm satisfied just to have all my fingers considering the countless hours I've spent swinging chainsaws and peaveys. :lol:

 

No, Rich, the problem I've had with my two Morses was with the finish. There's something in my chemistry that just erodes the finish and you can tell by looking at the palm rest where no fingernails make contact. Doug and I discussed having a metal escutcheon made for the button area but that wouldn't help the other parts so I decided to sell mine before I degraded them further. I'll get another Morse when there's a nickel-silver or stainless option I can afford.

 

I had a great time playing both my Céilís and they worked well. Whoever buys this instrument will have one that's really broken in but not broke down. Lots of Irish tunes went through this one and a lot of fun was had by all!

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I agree with Jack. From the pictures at least, the worn spots only give it some character. The worse thing you

can do to a vintage string instrument is refinish it because it will lower the value as well as sometimes change the tone.

If it sounds good and plays good, that's what counts.

 

Despite the extreme wear on the outside near the keys (the person must have played it a LOT and has long fingernails?)

HEY!

That was my Morse and I played it a lot. But contrary to what Rich thinks I don't have long fingernails. I work in forestry and have hardly any fingernails at all, in fact I'm satisfied just to have all my fingers considering the countless hours I've spent swinging chainsaws and peaveys. :lol:

 

No, Rich, the problem I've had with my two Morses was with the finish. There's something in my chemistry that just erodes the finish and you can tell by looking at the palm rest where no fingernails make contact. Doug and I discussed having a metal escutcheon made for the button area but that wouldn't help the other parts so I decided to sell mine before I degraded them further. I'll get another Morse when there's a nickel-silver or stainless option I can afford.

 

I had a great time playing both my Céilís and they worked well. Whoever buys this instrument will have one that's really broken in but not broke down. Lots of Irish tunes went through this one and a lot of fun was had by all!

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No, Rich, the problem I've had with my two Morses was with the finish. There's something in my chemistry that just erodes the finish and you can tell by looking at the palm rest where no fingernails make contact. Doug and I discussed having a metal escutcheon made for the button area but that wouldn't help the other parts so I decided to sell mine before I degraded them further.

I talked to Doug today about the finish issue and he cleared up a few things for me. One is that we had changed the black finish from when yours was made to be more durable, but it's the top clear coat which is more durable. The black is the sealer and a "paint" (not stain) layer. We're working with another finisher now about a more durable black stain *and* super-durable top coat. For some reason durability doesn't seem to be an issue with our cherry models. Different chemistry I suppose.

 

I had a great time playing both my Céilís and they worked well. Whoever buys this instrument will have one that's really broken in but not broke down. Lots of Irish tunes went through this one and a lot of fun was had by all!

That's what Doug and Colin (one of our workers who's a very good Irish player) said - that the box sounds and plays exceptionally well probably due to having been well broken in.

 

I was thinking that maybe the owner (current or future) could enhance the look by intentionally wearing it away.... We could then call it the "leopard" finish and might be more collectible/valuable for it? :P

 

-- Rich --

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Thanks for insightful and humorous replies.

 

Richard: Would the wear on the finish have a negative effect on the durability of the wood?

I am probably going to start bidding on this shortly (watch out Frank ;) ), and all said in this thread indicates that one way or another, I will end up with a Morse box.

 

Snorre

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Alas, someone beat me to it, in the last minute (being 4:54 in the morning in Oslo....) the winning bid was entered. Anyhow, I think I will go for a Morse, seeing the maker participating here, and all the good reviews this make has gotten.

 

Again thanks for the contributions.

 

Snorre

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