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Concertinists – Next Generation.


PeterT
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Judging by all the lovely pics posted of these up and coming young concertinists we have almost got enough to produce a calendar! :)

 

Chris

 

Absolutely! A Connor or Suttner calendar would be a viable alternative to the Pirelli calendar ... ;)

 

Seriously, though, the ratio of young ladies to young gentlemen in the posted photos would indicate that the Anglo really is, or is becoming, a women's instrument.

 

My favourite concertina-girl is the little one with the toy animals - my dream of a granddaughter! On the other hand, my own granddaughter is already 2 months old, and if she wants a concertina like that by the time she's 7, I'll have to start saving now! :o

 

Cheers,

John

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My favourite concertina-girl is the little one with the toy animals - my dream of a granddaughter! On the other hand, my own granddaughter is already 2 months old, and if she wants a concertina like that by the time she's 7, I'll have to start saving now! :o

Alternatively; if she's happy to wait until she's 25, they may be a lot cheaper! Tricky decision. On the other hand, if we can maintain sufficient interest, concertina values will continue to rise and you will have a win/win situation.

 

Maybe you should tell your grand-daughter that a Jeffries is extremely heavy, and suitable only for a grandfather (at this stage).

 

Either way; I hope you end up buying her a concertina.

 

Regards,

Peter.

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Professional players aged up to 30. They can be playing concerts, clubs, festivals, or teaching at residential events. Performing either solo, or in groups, using concertina. I’ll accept multi-instrumentalists, too. The key thing is that they are current performers, under the loosest terming of “professional”.

Next Generation – Players List.

 

Listed by country of normal residence. Young professionals up to the age of 30; older professionals up to the age of 40.

 

Young Professionals and those tipped to make the breakthrough at a professional level:

 

Ireland

 

Aogen Lynch

Padraig Rynne

Colm Delaney

Edel Fox

Niamh Ni Charra

Jack Talty

Hugh Healy

Aoife Kelly

Katie O Sullivan

Lorraine O Brien

Luci Benagh

Erica Keane

Aoife O Conor

Michelle Mulcahy

Lucy Benaghs

Kate McNamara

Sharon O Leary

Mareaid Considine

Ernestine Healy

Rory McMahon

Caitlin Mac Gabhann

Martha Clancy

Eoin Begley

Audrey Wardrick

Dympna O'Sullivan

Ailbhe or Aine ni Caba

Mairead Hurley

 

 

England

 

* John Dipper

* Emily Portman

Pip Ives

 

Scotland

 

* Frances Wilkins

 

USA

 

Chris “Junior” Stevens

Devin McCabe

Alex Reidinger

Asher Perkins

 

Slightly Older Professionals:

 

England

 

Chris Sherburn

* Damien Barber

* Rob Harbron

John Spiers

# Jon Boden

Liam Robinson

Stuart Estelle (multiple concertina systems)

 

 

Scotland

 

* Simon Thoumire

 

Other younger concertina players thought not to be currently performing as professionals, but well worth listening to:

 

Germany

 

* Juliette Daum

 

England

 

* Danny Chapman

 

Note:

 

Players of Anglo concertina unless marked as:

* = plays English system

# = plays Duet system

Edited by PeterT
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Guest Peter Laban

Peter, there are so many players here, listing them all, without glaring omissions, will be virtually impossible. Kate McNamara, Sharon O Leary and Mareaid Considine should be on there as well and I know at least half a dozen very nice concertina players locally in the 15-18 age group, possibly not fitting in the 'professional' bracket maybe but tomorrow's concertina players non the less. I can see a lot of faces I can't put a name to, I am notoriously bad at names, but there are so many more. And that situation can be replicated in dozens of little towns all over Ireland.

Edited by Peter Laban
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Peter, there are so many players here, listing them all, without glaring omissions, will be virtually impossible. Kate McNamara, Sharon O Leary and Mareaid Considine should be on there as well and I know at least half a dozen very nice concertina players locally in the 15-18 age group, possibly not fitting in the 'professional' bracket maybe but tomorrow's concertina players non the less. I can see a lot of faces I can't put a name to, I am notoriously bad at names, but there are so many more. And that situation can be replicated in dozens of little towns all over Ireland.

Thanks, Peter. How on earth could I forget Kate McNamara, after her superb playing on "Anglo International"?

 

The great thing is that I can add to our list, as names are remembered, or newer players come to the fore. The current list confirms my perception of the current scene in Ireland, and helps us to understand why there is a continued demand for top quality Anglo concertinas.

 

Regards,

Peter.

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I haven't had the time to read through all these posts, but obviously Asher Perkins, who plays his Edgley on my website would be an "up-and-coming player". He recently told me that he would like to update the video clip on my website as he says he plays much better now, if you can believe it! He regularly plays with the Irish group "Finvarra's Wren" in the Detroit area, and sometimes farther afield. He is almost ready to start giving online lessons, and I will get back to this forum when he has the technical details sorted out. You can find his family website as a link to mine - www.concertinas.ca .

Edited by Frank Edgley
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Asher Perkins, who plays his Edgley on my website would be an "up-and-coming player". He recently told me that he would like to update the video clip on my website as he says he plays much better now, if you can believe it! He regularly plays with the Irish group "Finvarra's Wren" in the Detroit area, and sometimes farther afield. He is almost ready to start giving online lessons, and I will get back to this forum when he has the technical details sorted out. You can find his family website as a link to mine - www.concertinas.ca .

Thanks, Frank. The video is playing now, and I recall watching it some months ago.

 

Regards,

Peter.

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Guest Peter Laban
The great thing is that I can add to our list, as names are remembered, or newer players come to the fore. The current list confirms my perception of the current scene in Ireland, and helps us to understand why there is a continued demand for top quality Anglo concertinas.

 

Maybe, problem is these players aren't 'new' to everybody: most of them have been around and playing for ages.

 

Concertina classes during the Willie Clancy week have grown massively in numbers, there are loads of children 8-15 playing and quite a few playing very well. Hard to pick any of them as 'new' by the time they're in their twenties.

Another pic, taken a few years ago. They're all fine players today, as they were then.We'll keep them off the list for now I think. They're there though and honing their skills.

 

Laichtin.jpg

 

 

Add Ernestine Healy as well by the way. And Rory McMahon, Caitlin Mac Gabhann, Martha Clancy and Eoin Begley, the latter did a programme on the 'Full Set' with his da, Seamus. That may still be here

Edited by Peter Laban
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Peter, there are so many players here, listing them all, without glaring omissions, will be virtually impossible. Kate McNamara, Sharon O Leary and Mareaid Considine should be on there as well and I know at least half a dozen very nice concertina players locally in the 15-18 age group, possibly not fitting in the 'professional' bracket maybe but tomorrow's concertina players non the less. I can see a lot of faces I can't put a name to, I am notoriously bad at names, but there are so many more. And that situation can be replicated in dozens of little towns all over Ireland.

 

 

Hi Peter

What is the driving force in Ireland do you think? I did notice that parents who were not involved in my generation can be very strong in supporting their kids to the extent that Anglos are at a premium!.

 

In England we have nothing like the organised structure of Comhaltas.. We don't tend to go in for competitions or even talent competitions and youngsters have to be from 'folkie' familes to get exposed young and go to trad festivals . Even radio awards etc. go to people who have developed a skill but there is no development work by such agencies. Even though we have had some regional folk development agencies they are being screwed down as money is diverted to the next Olympics! Maybe the CCE branches in England are our best hope for trad ( Irish)

 

Maybe someone from Folkworks in the North East of England can comment

 

There is always a flurry of interest when pub sessions are fashionable and accesible, but that scene is seemingly doomed with new licensing regs and fashions and drink driving crackdowns. Even school music is limited within the curriculum and freelance teachers are not supported.

 

 

I think as Pete Coe ( as I remember) once said of England 'We needed a dose of foreign colonization to make us value our traditions"

How strong are the Scottish or Welsh traditional scenes with young people?.

 

I wonder whether the apparent current state of interest in ITM , Morris, Old Time etc the USA is due to antipathy felt towards Bush etc and the response by other countries an identification with something perceived as more authentic.

 

I am not being contentious , I'd like an informed discussion.

 

I have 5 sons and whilst they grew up with the music and have fond memories , they don't want to play traditional music. Are they the dynamic multicuturalists and my generation the conservative old farts? My Irish Dad felt the same when I got into blues , skiffle and rock and put my fiddle and melodeon on the shelf! But he sang the blues and music hall songs as well as traditional songs.

 

Not worked this all out yet, but I'd welcome comments.

 

 

Mike

Edited by michael sam wild
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I wonder whether the apparent current state of interest in ITM , Morris, Old Time etc the USA is due to antipathy felt towards Bush etc and the response by other countries an identification with something perceived as more authentic.

 

 

I can't speak to any of the other questions you ask, but I can run on about this bit.

 

ITM: been around for awhile. All sorts of political points of view, which most keep to themselves. Popularity has grown but some would say it has more to do with the success of things like Riverdance. Most of the folks in my circle are left of center, but then so am I. We have a token right wingnut, but he's a love and politics are by consent off the table when he is at session.

 

Morris: Always been around in my awareness back to the 1970's. Mostly leftys looking for as you suggest "something perceived as more authentic".

 

Old Time: A lot of variety as to politics. Around here (New England) we list to mostly port, but elsewhere they be starboard, say like North Carolina (outside of Chapel Hill), Virginia, West Virginia. They are looking back to their roots and on that a lefty bastard like meself gets on well with them. My little trio Appalachian Travelers is a two leftys to one committable conservative (sorry Terry if you've snuck over here to take a look, 'cause you know you are). He has a gentile manner on both open back and bluegrass banjos and in musical matters we are of an accord.

 

In general, all the folks involved in the musical genre I knock about with it tend to shy away from overt political statements. Perhaps the lack of hope we (I) felt during the long rein of George the Dunce? Music was and is our safe harbor.

 

At Stone's I personally decline to sing Boulavogue, even though a certain patron often asks. It disturbs me. I beg off saying the words aren't memorized and we do him an instrumental version on flute and concertina at a laguid tempo. I don't burden him with whatever problems I have with the imagery. The Minstrel Boy is another matter.

 

Bluegrass: which you didn't ask about is a real mixed bag and the big gorilla in the room no one talks about except in hushed tones. :unsure: .

Edited by Mark Evans
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One might add Mairead Corridan to this list too.

 

Peter, there are so many players here, listing them all, without glaring omissions, will be virtually impossible. Kate McNamara, Sharon O Leary and Mareaid Considine should be on there as well and I know at least half a dozen very nice concertina players locally in the 15-18 age group, possibly not fitting in the 'professional' bracket maybe but tomorrow's concertina players non the less. I can see a lot of faces I can't put a name to, I am notoriously bad at names, but there are so many more. And that situation can be replicated in dozens of little towns all over Ireland.
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Well said, Mark. Things look pretty much the same from my vantage point in the San Francisco area.

 

Daniel

 

I wonder whether the apparent current state of interest in ITM , Morris, Old Time etc the USA is due to antipathy felt towards Bush etc and the response by other countries an identification with something perceived as more authentic.
ITM: been around for awhile. All sorts of political points of view, which most keep to themselves. Popularity has grown but some would say it has more to do with the success of things like Riverdance. Most of the folks in my circle are left of center, but then so am I. We have a token right wingnut, but he's a love and politics are by consent off the table when he is at session.

 

Morris: Always been around in my awareness back to the 1970's. Mostly leftys looking for as you suggest "something perceived as more authentic".

 

Old Time: A lot of variety as to politics. Around here (New England) we list to mostly port, but elsewhere they be starboard, say like North Carolina (outside of Chapel Hill), Virginia, West Virginia.

 

Bluegrass: which you didn't ask about is a real mixed bag and the big gorilla in the room no one talks about except in hushed tones. :unsure: .

Edited by Daniel Hersh
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If you want to know just how good Pip is on his anglo he has posted some videos on Youtube of his playing especially the Blowzabella tune Horizonto: Pip is stonkingly good and I have seen and heard him perform live at the fortnightly Anything but Irish night at the Cumberland Arms in Byker Newcastle!Just type in Pipives into Youtube:

 

Chris

 

Well, Thanks very much for the compliment Chris! :rolleyes:

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Peter, there are so many players here, listing them all, without glaring omissions, will be virtually impossible. Kate McNamara, Sharon O Leary and Mareaid Considine should be on there as well and I know at least half a dozen very nice concertina players locally in the 15-18 age group, possibly not fitting in the 'professional' bracket maybe but tomorrow's concertina players non the less. I can see a lot of faces I can't put a name to, I am notoriously bad at names, but there are so many more. And that situation can be replicated in dozens of little towns all over Ireland.

 

What is the driving force in Ireland do you think? I did notice that parents who were not involved in my generation can be very strong in supporting their kids to the extent that Anglos are at a premium!.

 

In England we have nothing like the organised structure of Comhaltas.. We don't tend to go in for competitions or even talent competitions and youngsters have to be from 'folkie' familes to get exposed young and go to trad festivals . Even radio awards etc. go to people who have developed a skill but there is no development work by such agencies. Even though we have had some regional folk development agencies they are being screwed down as money is diverted to the next Olympics! Maybe the CCE branches in England are our best hope for trad ( Irish)

 

Maybe someone from Folkworks in the North East of England can comment

 

As a young person...I stumbled upon this instrument by accident...if I hadn't been watching the BBC festival coverage, I'd never of seen Bellowhead, never of got the albums, or discovered Spires & Boden, never have joined the forum and found out about these instruments I'd not even heard of before.

Really I think someone aught to go round schools and give talks about this stuff....or offer lessons at youth clubs. Well crime amoungst youngsters is always blamed on there being nothing to occupy them...why not concertina lessons? Plus they'd spend all there money on a concertina..wouldn't have any left to buy alcohol/drugs etc. :P

Edited by LDT
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I remember reading and perhaps on Melodeon.net that someone's child had mentioned a melodeon at school in England and the music teacher had asked what on earth that was. To which the kid replied, 'That's the instrument English music is played on'.

 

It is disgraceful that such a teacher does not know of the melodeon but there you have it.

 

Ian

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