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Hi folks, I am new to this board and in the process of buying a concertina.

 

As I can't get involved in any technical discussion or ask real questions until I get an instrument... I will ask a lame personal question...

How long have most of you have been playing and why did you start playing in the first place?

Why do you keep playing?

 

 

 

Just passing the time until I can play along with you.

Alden

Because I am as mad as a hatter.

 

Thanks for that Dick. I laughed like a drain and feel less alone in my madness too.

 

Ian

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Hi folks, I am new to this board and in the process of buying a concertina.

 

As I can't get involved in any technical discussion or ask real questions until I get an instrument... I will ask a lame personal question...

How long have most of you have been playing and why did you start playing in the first place?

Why do you keep playing?

 

 

 

Just passing the time until I can play along with you.

Alden

 

 

Started out on Harmonica when very young (gift from a grandfather), than went the route of Violin, voice, recorder family, and came back to harmonica and found out what made that sound I loved that i could not peg down. Been playing a Anglo of one type or another since than (about 3 1/2 years ago now). Come from a family where is music is important and have a wife that is extremely musically talented (one of her instruments is the English Concertina). Teaching my son how to play a 20 button lachenal key of C/C that we own and going to build him a 20 button in the keys of F/A so that he can play the melody with us a lot easier. The oldest daughter is already bending notes on her harmonica and the cycle begins again.

 

Best of luck and warning these are wonderfully addictive instruments and can play a good bit more than just folk music on them (I like trying out jazz scores on my anglo, makes the fingers work). Again best of luck and look around there are many fine instruments both new and used that can be had these days.

 

Michael

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Hello Alden,

 

Here's a thought, from the one & only Scott Skinner:

 

"Talent does what it can. Genius does what it must."

 

But seriously, some of us just have to play ...... & trust me, most of us would NOT fall into the genius bracket!

 

Cheers

Dick

Edited by Ptarmigan
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I went away away and thought deeply about why I have always wanted to play.

 

Traditional music touched me deeply as a child and it always seemed to express what my family and our community (and hence myself in turn) valued . In the words of another musician, Danny Meehan , a fiddler - 'It sustained us'

 

 

Over the years, therefore, I sought any instrument I could get my hands on to find a way to express my spirit and that of my friends and family.

 

But the driving force has always been to get the music out from inside of myself , from where it bubbles up. If it doesn't get out it gets stifled and tears you up.

 

Over the years I've given up playing from time to time while I sorted out my life, and got disillusioned, but the music has always come back and pulled me through. And believe me life can swamp you. But you have to fight your way through!

 

 

Embrace it and hold on to it tenaciously, it will always help to see you through. ( As can any firm belief and practice)

 

 

Cheers

Mike

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I went away away and thought deeply about why I have always wanted to play.

 

...But the driving force has always been to get the music out from inside of myself , from where it bubbles up. If it doesn't get out it gets stifled and tears you up.

 

Over the years I've given up playing from time to time while I sorted out my life, and got disillusioned, but the music has always come back and pulled me through. And believe me life can swamp you. But you have to fight your way through!

 

 

Embrace it and hold on to it tenaciously, it will always help to see you through. ( As can any firm belief and practice)

 

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Certainly I once had a period of time (several years) when I didn't make any music and my spirit, in retrospect, was undernourished and unexpressed through that time. I've since gone through shorter periods of not playing concertina and when I pick it up again, whatever tune I play feels like a much missed emotional release.

Samantha

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I play because I can't not play.

 

Even when the reality-check moments (i.e. every time I play in front of someone!) are making me want to jump into a big hole in the ground, I'm thinking "mustn't forget the concertina". :rolleyes:

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How long have I been playing? Violin for 8 years, fiddle for 5, English concertina since April, playing around with lap dulcimer, piano, recorder, practice chanter, and other random noisemakers with varying levels of success; quite a while. Of course, I've been constantly exposed to music for oh, nine months before I was born up to the present day.

 

Why do I play? You can ask me why I breathe, it'll be the same answer. Like Ishtar said, I play because I can't not play. I've had music in my life, in some form, every single moment I've been alive, whether it was my mom practicing the piano before I was born, playing the harp at night when I was a toddler before I went to sleep, going to Community Concerts since I was born, singing along to Spike Jones while I vacuum the house, breaking the toy violin trying to play it, learning how to play a real violin, discovering that I could play any sort of music I wanted to so long as I could read the music--even if the score said it was for another instrument, listening to my friends play music in the evenings at living history events and having a wonderful time at it, having iPod earbuds constantly glued to my head, teaching myself the concertina, or simply singing for the joy of it. When I was younger (and even up to age 11 or so) when I was happy and wanted to thank someone or simply show my appreciation for their company the most natural thing for me to do was start humming, I've stopped that now, since it often gets misinterpreted as not paying attention or being disrespectful, but I still sing in my head.

 

Why do I keep playing? Because I'm not suicidal.

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How long have I been playing? Violin for 8 years, fiddle for 5, English concertina since April, playing around with lap dulcimer, piano, recorder, practice chanter, and other random noisemakers with varying levels of success; quite a while. Of course, I've been constantly exposed to music for oh, nine months before I was born up to the present day.

 

Why do I play? You can ask me why I breathe, it'll be the same answer. Like Ishtar said, I play because I can't not play. I've had music in my life, in some form, every single moment I've been alive, whether it was my mom practicing the piano before I was born, playing the harp at night when I was a toddler before I went to sleep, going to Community Concerts since I was born, singing along to Spike Jones while I vacuum the house, breaking the toy violin trying to play it, learning how to play a real violin, discovering that I could play any sort of music I wanted to so long as I could read the music--even if the score said it was for another instrument, listening to my friends play music in the evenings at living history events and having a wonderful time at it, having iPod earbuds constantly glued to my head, teaching myself the concertina, or simply singing for the joy of it. When I was younger (and even up to age 11 or so) when I was happy and wanted to thank someone or simply show my appreciation for their company the most natural thing for me to do was start humming, I've stopped that now, since it often gets misinterpreted as not paying attention or being disrespectful, but I still sing in my head.

 

Why do I keep playing? Because I'm not suicidal.

 

 

"Why do I keep Playing? Because I'm not suicidal."

That is my quote for the week. Thanks.

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"Why do I keep Playing? Because I'm not suicidal."

That is my quote for the week. Thanks.

I'm not suicidal ..... yet, but that doesn't motivate me sufficiently!

 

I've just (minutes ago) had a telephone call asking me to play somewhere tomorrow evening. If I go, this will be my first public appearance since February! I'm free to do so, since my pupil is not visiting this week.

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Why do I play?

I occasionally feel that it is my concertina that is playing me, making me try again and again to get that tune out with no mistakes, to put that bit more expression in. Whatever, there is great compulsion involved and a feeling of betraying myself and the instument if I don't practice.

 

I played (and still do) a few instruments over the years, but this last year with english concertina has felt most like "coming home", a feeling that this is the one I want to put my efforts into.

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I've just (minutes ago) had a telephone call asking me to play somewhere tomorrow evening.

 

Ah, the musician's lot. Best to keep one's chops up during the holiday season even without scheduled gigs, in anticipation of this. Two weeks ago, I had booked a band for a gig that was erroneously scheduled one week prior. I only realized this the afternoon of the performance and had to find a replacement in three hours.

 

Have a great show ;)

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I've just (minutes ago) had a telephone call asking me to play somewhere tomorrow evening.

 

Ah, the musician's lot. Best to keep one's chops up during the holiday season even without scheduled gigs, in anticipation of this.

Oh well, I decided against it, even though it's only just over half a mile from home, but then I turned down a potential booking at the Wilton's Music Hall, London, at the end of the summer.

 

Think I've reached the stage in my musical "career" where I would rather sit at home and play, or not play, as the mood takes me.

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Hello Alden

 

The reason why I decided to try my hands at the English Concertina was I have been playing tamboureen in a Morris band in Brasstown, NC for the past 6 years and I wanted to play melody! In May of this year I met my first concertina, a Wheatstone and I just thought it was the sweetest music I had heard. Since there was already two sometimes three larger squeeze boxes in the band I decided that a little english concertina was fitting. We have a rather large funky band...tuba included!

 

I bought a beautiful Stagi, 48 button tenor and it served me till about two weeks ago when I found a lovely Wheatstone, English 48 treble. Of course the cost was three times as much, but in the 6 months that I been at this, I have been really practicing and it shows.

I made the decision to upgrade because I had stuck with it and feel like I am really serious. Besides it is way more fun to play melody in our band. I started out playing the viollin/fiddle, but I knew I didn't want to carry a fiddle with me when we dance out.

 

When I bought my Stagi I got what I could afford at the time. I did buy it new, so I don't think I will have a problem in selling it. When I knew I LOVE playing, I started saving my money to get a Wheatstone!

 

Pam

Brasstown, NC

 

 

 

>>>>How long have most of you have been playing and why did you start playing in the first place?

Why do you keep playing?<<<

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Hi folks, I am new to this board and in the process of buying a concertina.

 

As I can't get involved in any technical discussion or ask real questions until I get an instrument... I will ask a lame personal question...

How long have most of you have been playing and why did you start playing in the first place?

Why do you keep playing?

 

 

 

Just passing the time until I can play along with you.

Alden

 

 

Alden, as you probably will find out it can be a compulsion. Not a bad one, though.

 

I have been playing since the late 1960s, I think my first exposure to the instrument was through the Disney movies in the '50s, maybe Kirk Douglas in '20,000 Leagues'. Unlike many of the other board members the concertina is my only instrument (Well I may admit under torture to owning a few old button boxes).

 

I have carried my old C.Jeffries FC around the world many times over and found it a great comfort through the years.

my playing sort of evolved from a plastic ended East German Anglo to a Bastari to a Lachenal to a series of english made anglos which now include the Jeffries and a Wheatstone Linota. In addition I also have accumulated two English pattern instruments for variety.

 

I keep playing for two of the reasons already mentioned: 'Because I must' and '...mad as a hatter'.

 

Good luck with the concertina!

 

Jim Richardson (oldchief)

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