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Wild-looking One On Ebay


Daniel Hersh
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I would love to see someone walk into a folk club with *that*.

 

wg

 

So would I Wendy, especially if she was wearing a suitably modest & discreet Blue dress to match! ;)

 

Can I take it then Wendy, that

would not be a typical Concertina floor spot, at your local Folk Club?

 

Cheers

Dick

Edited by Ptarmigan
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I would love to see someone walk into a folk club with *that*.

 

wg

 

So would I Wendy, especially if she was wearing a suitably modest & discreet Blue dress to match! ;)

 

Can I take it then Wendy, that

would not be a typical Concertina floor spot, at your local Folk Club?

 

Cheers

Dick

 

I can barely get Twickenham to be polite about a very modest banjo.

 

wg

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so, I've been lurking all these months on c.net and never saw any of these "chemnitzer" involved in discussions. I am in that neck of the woods (midwest USA) and just finally identified today what these BIG kids are. How appropriate to see this for sale. And how do all those reed and bellows and button and stops discussions apply to these big guys? (do they have true concertina reeds? or accordian?) My impressions from research is it is difficult to find fingering charts?? and music. But we do have the Concertina Beer Hall in Milwaukee that I guess I'd better get a date to go to! If this is the local availablity and ethnic slant--would this be an advisable or inadvisable route for a beginner?? thoughts from the crowd. shelly0312 PS notice, we play in "beer halls" around here, not cutsy "folk clubs".........

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And how do all those reed and bellows and button and stops discussions apply to these big guys? (do they have true concertina reeds? or accordian?) My impressions from research is it is difficult to find fingering charts?? and music.

 

This one has accordeon reeds. You can see it on the photos: There are two reeds on a small plate, waxed on the stock. The old concertinas (Chemnitzer, Karlsfelder, Kreefelder = Bandonions) have a different concept: They have have reed-plates (usually from zinc), where many reeds are fixed on. They look like a heavy plate from a harmonica. This is, of course, different from accordion reeds, but different also from this, the folk-folk here calls "concertina-reeds". And, of course, all sound different. :D

 

There are quite some Chemnitzer concertina videos on Youtube. It's a pitty there are virtually no Karlsfelder. :(

 

Sebastian

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We've had periodic Chemnitzer discussions here -- do a search under "Chemnitzer" and they'll turn up. Ted Kloba is our resident Chemnitzer expert but hasn't posted much in a while. There's lots of good info on his web site:http://www.geocities.com/heytud.

 

so, I've been lurking all these months on c.net and never saw any of these "chemnitzer" involved in discussions. I am in that neck of the woods (midwest USA) and just finally identified today what these BIG kids are. How appropriate to see this for sale. And how do all those reed and bellows and button and stops discussions apply to these big guys? (do they have true concertina reeds? or accordian?) My impressions from research is it is difficult to find fingering charts?? and music. But we do have the Concertina Beer Hall in Milwaukee that I guess I'd better get a date to go to! If this is the local availablity and ethnic slant--would this be an advisable or inadvisable route for a beginner?? thoughts from the crowd. shelly0312 PS notice, we play in "beer halls" around here, not cutsy "folk clubs".........
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This one's rather interesting. It appears to be a cross between a concertina and a bandoneon - more so than a chemnitzer. Watching the video seems to support this notion given his bellows management. Also given its reed type and configuration/construction. I've emailed the seller requesting more particulars, esp. regarding weight and dimensions given his descriptive comments.

 

Might anyone have any idea what the proper value of this might be - or how to even BWAG a value?

 

Be Well,

 

Dan

Edited by danersen
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This one's rather interesting. It appears to be a cross between a concertina and a bandoneon - more so than a chemnitzer. Watching the video seems to support this notion given his bellows management. Also given its reed type and configuration/construction. I've emailed the seller requesting more particulars, esp. regarding weight and dimensions given his descriptive comments.

 

Might anyone have any idea what the proper value of this might be - or how to even BWAG a value?

 

Be Well,

 

Dan

 

Why is it a cross between a concertina and a bandoneon? You mean an English concertina?

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So far as I know its button layout and reed set-up are typical for an Italian-made Chemnitzer. What's unusual about it, other than the color and shape?

 

Re a price, there are a few concertinas of the same make (Grand) offered for sale here for prices ranging from $995 to $1450. But it's very difficult to predict an eBay selling price, especially for an unusual item.

 

This one's rather interesting. It appears to be a cross between a concertina and a bandoneon - more so than a chemnitzer. Watching the video seems to support this notion given his bellows management. Also given its reed type and configuration/construction. I've emailed the seller requesting more particulars, esp. regarding weight and dimensions given his descriptive comments.

 

Might anyone have any idea what the proper value of this might be - or how to even BWAG a value?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all,

I've been busy with my guitar amp building & other electronics (see my blog) and with my wife's latest recording (see her page), but I'm still playing my concertina and still part of the Cicero Concertina Circle. I just dropped in to see what's new at C.net...

I've seen a couple of those in person at events. From a sound or playability standpoint it's nothing special at all: Just a novelty shape for an ordinary Italian-made "wax box". Rather accordioney sounding.
Interesting...notice the microphone suspended in the middle of the bellows with rubber bands?
That's common in most Chemnitzers that have passed through a US shop. It's a horrible ceramic mic element, glued to a Masonite square. I think the Chicago builders bought thousands of these back in the 1940s and the stock lasted through the end of Star's existence (2000) and when Christy Hengel bought out the old Vitak Elsnic factory, he took another load up to Minnesoota. I've retrofitted mine: I bought a decent dynamic element and mounted it through a square of neoprene (a piece of mouse pad to be exact). It still is relatively feedback-immune like the old mic, but is a lot more natural sounding (though of course not as natural as a nice condenser mic on the outside of the instrument). Good for sound reinforcement in a noisy band setting.
(do they have true concertina reeds? or accordian?)
This one has accordion reeds. But it's not really an either-or proposition. There are at least a handful of different reed types and mounting configuration, and at least two of those are called "concertina" reeds, just as there are several very different instruments that are called "concertina".
My impressions from research is it is difficult to find fingering charts?? and music.
It looks like someone has already pointed you to my site for fingering charts. As for music, every time I go to a club meeting someone's either offering me a stack of "notes" or asking why I haven't learned the 37 tunes they gave me last month. These guys are mostly elderly and are realizing they'll never get time to even look through them all, much less learn them. Many inherited their libraries from family members who passed on before them.
PS notice, we play in "beer halls" around here, not cutsy "folk clubs".........
Good point! Although I started out taking classical lessons on piano, when I play folk music on a folk instrument, I expect some raucous drunken exuberance!
There are quite some Chemnitzer concertina videos on Youtube. It's a pitty there are virtually no Karlsfelder. :(
Probably because there were so many Chemnitzers made in the USA (or in Germany/Italy for export to the USA) and so much music published here.
We've had periodic Chemnitzer discussions here -- do a search under "Chemnitzer" and they'll turn up. Ted Kloba is our resident Chemnitzer expert but hasn't posted much in a while. There's lots of good info on his web site:http://www.geocities.com/heytud.
Thanks. I got lucky this time, but feel free to send me an email through C.net if it ever comes up and I'm not around.
Might anyone have any idea what the proper value of this might be - or how to even BWAG a value?
I'm surprised it only ended at $877. I would have thought the novelty factor would have boosted it a bit. Edited by Theodore Kloba
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