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Prices During Crisis


RP3

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During a recent eBay auction of a Dipper-restored Jeffries discussed in this forum, I opined that the opening price and Buy-It-Now price might have been too high given the current world financial meltdown. Well, needless to say the Jeffries brought the $10,500 Buy-It-Now price and I was mildly surprised and humbled. Now I am shocked! Another eBay auction, this time for an unrestored and pitiful looking 38 button Jeffries brought $8,460! Given that this instrument appears to need a full overhaul -- including a new bellows -- it looks like any Jeffries owners now need to increase their insurance coverage. I don't have anything more than a guess as to how much the restoration would cost, but I think it could easily top $3,000 making the Dipper-restored Jeffries a relative bargain at $10,500. Hate to think what Dippers are really worth now??!! And my sympathies go out to anybody currently on a Jeffries or Wheatstone hunt. I would think a better solution would be to get on Wally Carroll's/Dipper's/Suttner's (take your pick) waiting list .

 

Ross Schlabach

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Yeah 8500$, must have been a heck of a surprise for the seller! I'm very curious about how the buyer will turn this purchase into a profit, but knowing his experience trading these instruments, he'll certainly find a way.

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This topic could take off like that English vs. Anglo thread and perhaps a little gasoline thrown on the subject can start the blaze roaring.

 

Jefferies concertinas, the vintage creme de la creme of our world, are seriously undervalued. At $10,000 plus they now demand the price of a lower end fine violin, $20,000 less expensive than a per-war Gibson Mastertone flat top banjo...and the list just starts.

 

We moan, but have been damned lucky.

 

I'm more concerned with keeping a roof over my head and a job to go to every day :ph34r: .

Edited by Mark Evans
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The market for vintage instruments is unbelievable. One of a dealer's favorite stories centers around a Sunburst '59 Les Paul Standard that was auctioned last spring."It had been pretty heavily played, but it also had nearly all its original parts," he recalls. "The owner and his wife were retired. They were living in a trailer and were hoping to get enough money from the sale of the guitar to build a log home. The owner figured the guitar was worth around $100,000, but in fact the guitar ended up selling for $295,000"

 

 

A new Gibson F-5 mandolin sells or about $20,000. A Lloyd Loar Gibson F-5 mandolin will sell for an astronomical amount:

 

GIBSON F-5 (1924) signed and dated by Lloyd Loar on Dec. 1, 1924 ... in the same family since at least the 1930's, excellent structural shape (crack free), some evident scratches on the finish. ... THE DENVER FOLKLORE CENTER (SN:79756) 90U-5005 .. $225,000.00.

Crabbs and Jeffries may seem over-priced but they are not nearly as expenwsive as vintage bluegrass instruments. Count your blessings.

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Another interesting factor is when you look at prices for new Dippers, Suttners, new Wheatstones, etc... They sell for around 4500 euros, and for the amount of time the makers spend on the instruments + expenses, it's clearly not such a hefty price.

 

Based on this, 7 000 euros for a vintage concertina doesnt seem that high.

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With the increase of the interest in Concertinas Worldwide ,the Jeffries Concertina is becoming rarer and more valuable and top Wheatstone Concertinas are going the same way.One of my first postings on this site was a prediction of this price increase and suggested you buy now.I seem to be putting up my Insurance cover every year,it is almost getting scary to take out a couple of Jeffries to a Gig or even one.The replacement, if they are stolen is also a big worry as it takes a number of years to be completely happy with what you play.How players can walk off and leave their instruments unguarded just never ceases to amaze me.

So what of the difficult future,we have all gone through boom and busts and concertina prices have always continued to rise despite economic problems ,the concertina prices have peaked for a little while,but will rise again.It is the sad case that Jeffries are no longer made,I still think they are the best ,with Linotas a very close second.

Supply is no longer ,demand is greater than ever,it answers the question.

Al

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i find current jeffries prices to be ludicrously higher than hard dollar-to-product value would warrant, though if there has been a dipper rebuild including action & rosalie bellows that might be different....but i have been dumbfounded at some of what's gone on quite recently....this latest "dipper-restored" jeffries did not have new action or bellows.....

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The market for vintage instruments is unbelievable. One of a dealer's favorite stories centers around a Sunburst '59 Les Paul Standard that was auctioned last spring."It had been pretty heavily played, but it also had nearly all its original parts," he recalls. "The owner and his wife were retired. They were living in a trailer and were hoping to get enough money from the sale of the guitar to build a log home. The owner figured the guitar was worth around $100,000, but in fact the guitar ended up selling for $295,000"

 

 

A new Gibson F-5 mandolin sells or about $20,000. A Lloyd Loar Gibson F-5 mandolin will sell for an astronomical amount:

 

GIBSON F-5 (1924) signed and dated by Lloyd Loar on Dec. 1, 1924 ... in the same family since at least the 1930's, excellent structural shape (crack free), some evident scratches on the finish. ... THE DENVER FOLKLORE CENTER (SN:79756) 90U-5005 .. $225,000.00.

Crabbs and Jeffries may seem over-priced but they are not nearly as expenwsive as vintage bluegrass instruments. Count your blessings.

 

Don't forget though that string instruments are more mainstream, with more players around and higher standards of playing.

A concertina is a musical toy to the most, overcomplicated and obscure. Especially when first timer violin, guitar and banjo are so much cheaper and better than first timer's concertina. It creates a stigma. Those who entertain the idea and decide to struggle though a cheap chinese one, have slower progress and tend to unimpress others, who pick up guitar or piano. So the price reflects many factors. One of the serious factors is, for example, the pyramid scheme, when dealers begin to swarm and pick them at inflated prices, inflating prices even more. All hope to outsmart the other and sell just before the price will start to drop. It's a consideration too.

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i find current jeffries prices to be ludicrously higher than hard dollar-to-product value would warrant, though if there has been a dipper rebuild including action & rosalie bellows that might be different....but i have been dumbfounded at some of what's gone on quite recently....this latest "dipper-restored" jeffries did not have new action or bellows.....

 

I guess it depends on what Jeffries you've tried before. I was lucky (or doomed) to try one very, very good Jeffries a few weeks ago and believe me, it was worth it's full price. But I salute people who buy 10 000$ instruments without even trying them, it takes lots of nerves...

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