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Hello,

I have been reading this site for 6 months and have learned a lot. I have a Rochelle that I purchased from the Button Box. It is my first musical instrument. My question is, what does this mean? Bb. It is the small b that confuses me. Actually I have lots of questions, but this will do for now

Thanks,

Mike

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Hello,

I have been reading this site for 6 months and have learned a lot. I have a Rochelle that I purchased from the Button Box. It is my first musical instrument. My question is, what does this mean? Bb. It is the small b that confuses me. Actually I have lots of questions, but this will do for now

Thanks,

Mike

The second b signifies a flat.........Thus Eb is the note E flat....Bb is the note B flat.....they're the black notes on the panano :o)

 

Alternately # signifies a sharp note so F# = F sharp.

 

But I bet there are other opinions on the matter (wink)

 

Phil

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Hello,

I have been reading this site for 6 months and have learned a lot. I have a Rochelle that I purchased from the Button Box. It is my first musical instrument. My question is, what does this mean? Bb. It is the small b that confuses me. Actually I have lots of questions, but this will do for now

Thanks,

Mike

 

Hi, Mike,

Welcome to the forum!

 

The answer to your question is quite simple: read "Bb" as B-flat". The note a semitone below B.

 

Computer keyboards don't have musical symbols, so we cheat by using a small "b" for the "flat" sign. Fortunately, we have the American pound or number character for "sharp" - that's "#" as in "F#" = "F-sharp", the note a semitone above F.

 

Next question! ;)

 

Cheers,

John

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Each note has a note that's sharp in relation to it (the next key to the right on a piano keyboard, black or white) and a note that's flat in relation to it (the next key to the left on a piano keyboard, black or white).

 

b means flat

 

# means sharp

 

So Bb means the note directly to the left of B on a piano keyboard..

 

Every piece of music, every song, every tune, is written in a key. The names of the keys are the same as the names of the notes: A, B, C, D, E, F, G. The name of the key, for example the key of C, means that the scale (do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti do) (go find a copy of The Sound of Music soundtrack and listen to "Do, a Deer") starts with a C note.

 

Now, C is the only scale on a piano that can be played with no sharps or flats. So no little b's or little tic-tac-toe grids at the beginning of the written-down notes. C D E F G A B C

 

The key of G starts on the note G. However, because of the notes' relation to each other, the basic scale is G A B C D E F# G

 

There is also a key of Bb. That is the "home key" for clarinets and, therefore, most jazz music.

 

Does this help?

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Just to confuddle you more: an F# is a Gb, G# is an Ab, an A# is a Bb, a C# is a Db, and a D# is an Eb.

Likewise, a B is a Cb, while a C is a B#. And an F is an E#, while the E is an Fb.

Note that this is only true in equal temperment. Otherwise things get real confusing.

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Just to confuddle you more: an F# is a Gb, G# is an Ab, an A# is a Bb, a C# is a Db, and a D# is an Eb.

Likewise, a B is a Cb, while a C is a B#. And an F is an E#, while the E is an Fb.

Note that this is only true in equal temperment. Otherwise things get real confusing.

As a newbie myself and a lifetime member of the I.S.S. (International Sarcasm Society), I just want to say, sincerely, Gee Thanks! <_<

 

(edited for crappy spelling of "of")

Edited by drbones
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Just to confuddle you more: an F# is a Gb, G# is an Ab, an A# is a Bb, a C# is a Db, and a D# is an Eb.

Likewise, a B is a Cb, while a C is a B#. And an F is an E#, while the E is an Fb.

Note that this is only true in equal temperment. Otherwise things get real confusing.

As a newbie myself and a lifetime member ot the I.S.S. (International Sarcasm Society), I just want to say, sincerely, Gee Thanks! <_<

Since you're keen on the subject, you could also study up on double sharps and double flats. And if you start getting into Arabic or experimental music, quarter-tones.

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