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Some New Tunes


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I'm afraid... I don't care what the original notation says... it just sounds so much better with C naturals I'm going to be keeping them!

 

Cheers - Danny

 

Ah Ha there Jim Lad, them there's fighting words! :ph34r: 2.gif

 

This calls for pistols at dawn! 7.gif

 

But seriously Danny, yeah I suppose we often go with the first version we hear of a tune.

A bit like seeing one actor take on a role, only to be replaced later on by another.

I guess it's always hard for us to accept the new version we hear, or see.

So you'll always be looking for C Nats in that tune & me C#s.

 

So I reckon we'll just have to settle for ~ You say Potato & I say Potato, you say Tomato & I say Tomato

 

.... & just call the whole fight off! :lol:

 

Lucky for you, cause I have a Black Belt in Origami 8.gif

 

Cheers

Dick

 

P.S. Don't worry Danny, I plan to post a couple of mp3s of my own playing, one of those days.

So feel free to get your revenge on me, by picking holes in my feable efforts! -_-

Edited by Ptarmigan
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I've got DT's recording of Roslin Castle and Danny's arrangement indeed is very similar. The two largest differences is that DT plays a single line with a sparse guitar backup (often playing the harmony), and that DT plays with a more Scottish flavor (crisper counters/snaps here and there).

 

-- Rich --

 

Where did your recording of DT playing Rosline Castle come from, Rich? I have DT playing it on his CD 'Concertina Landscape', followed by Wilsons Wild/The Soldier's Joy/Old Oxford and there is no sound of a guitar backup, however sparse. The only other instruments that appear on this CD, are cello and harp.

 

Chris

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Where did your recording of DT playing Rosline Castle come from, Rich?

 

Portrait of a concertina.

 

I always find it rather disturbing that the concertina in the album cover picture hovers slightly above the table...

 

 

Ah, yes, that version with Nick Hooper on guitar. That takes me back a bit. Had forgotten about it!

 

Chris

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Lovely playing! And I was amazed to recognise the Scottische version of Roslin Castle (never having heard the tune before) as being very close to the (Trad French?) tune I know as Scottische a Bethanie:

 

 

Aha! Actually I play Rosline Castle, then "some french scottische", the rosline castle again as a scottische.

 

So... the tune on your link is the "some French Scottische" - now I know its name! Also it's significantly different, and I rather like that version (definitely goes on the to-learn list) - Thanks :)

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So... the tune on your link is the "some French Scottische" - now I know its name! Also it's significantly different, and I rather like that version (definitely goes on the to-learn list) - Thanks :)

 

Just occasionally, some good seems to come out of my general state of total confusion... :lol: :blink:

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Very, very tasty indeed Sir.

 

I guess we can discuss legitimacy of performing French Scottish on EC, and how much better and authentic it would sound on AC.

 

For me, after listening to Norman Chalmers playing Scottish music on E.C. for the past 30 odd years, the E.C. sounds perfect for Scottish Music, to my ears.

 

But then maybe that's just me. ;)

 

Anyway, thanks very much for posting these track links Danny. Made my day! :D

 

Cheers

Dick

 

Simply great music Danny!

Concerning the Scottische or Scottish, this to my knowledge is a dance played a lot in France but also in other west European countries of the continent. And although it is called Scottish I really do not know if it is actually known and played\danced in Scotland itself!

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Simply great music Danny!

Concerning the Scottische or Scottish, this to my knowledge is a dance played a lot in France but also in other west European countries of the continent. And although it is called Scottish I really do not know if it is actually known and played\danced in Scotland itself!

 

Just for the record, here's a Highland Schottische { Fling} being danced:

 

https://www.aberdeenfertility.org.uk/scotts...lip.php?id=vc10

 

... & here's what they sound like on a BIG BOX

 

 

Another interesting tune to examine its origin is the Schottische, which is found in Sweden as well as in Scotland and Northern Ireland; also, the Irish barndances are little bit like Schottisches. The exciting point is that you find Schottisches also in Germany as common dances. As Jo Meyer, of the popular German folk band Jams, says "The Schottische has been one of the most common dances in Germany until well after World War 2. But there is also the Highland Schottische in Scotland, with the same dance and the same rhythm. Schottische has been widely spread throughout Northern Europe in the last century, and there are many discussions about the origin. At least the name Schottische seems not to have the word 'Scottish' as origin, but the Low German word 'Schottschen' which means 'dancing'. And you can find in Sweden Schottisches called 'Hamburg' and 'Engelska', so it's a Schottische as it has been played in Hamburg and England.”

 

Differences and Similarities

 

Cheers

Dick

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Lovely playing! And I was amazed to recognise the Scottische version of Roslin Castle (never having heard the tune before) as being very close to the (Trad French?) tune I know as Scottische a Bethanie:

 

 

Aha! Actually I play Rosline Castle, then "some french scottische", the rosline castle again as a scottische.

 

So... the tune on your link is the "some French Scottische" - now I know its name! Also it's significantly different, and I rather like that version (definitely goes on the to-learn list) - Thanks :)

 

The comment with the youtube-video "French Tune: Scottish a Bethanie" says:

A scottish is a popular French dance, not especially related to the schottische (or other spellings). I learned this tune many years ago. It had no name (trad. arr.) so I named it for my wife.

 

So this is how tunes get their various names ..... :o

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

And here it is as a border morris dance, by Boggarts Breakfast, played on diatonic accordions and drums -

 

Takking Boggarts

 

This is one of the best morris videos I've ever seen. The tune seems to be closely related to the jig, The Plane Tree. Boggarts Breakfast posts some notes on their web site -

 

Schottische a Bethanie

 

I suppose Accordeonaire plays for them.

 

David Haimson

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