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Chords Fingering


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Well my first anglo concertina arrived a couple of days ago, and frankly i have been utterly delighted with this little box of joy, even if i can't get anything good out of it yet!

:)

 

just a thought though, have been looking at http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php...hl=anglo+chords (thank you Tina, it's SO useful!) but am finding some of the chord fingerings a little tight, which kinda surprised me as i have played mandolin and guitar for years and am pretty used to awkward contortions for chords! i'm sure it will just take a while to get used to, and i'll put the hours in til it does, but was just wondering if there are any 'recommended fingering' charts out there at all, or whether most people just do whatever feels comfortable? I've heard that using one finger for two buttons is not a good plan, so i'm trying to avoid that, but is there anything else i should bear in mind?

any help or pointers would be much appreciated!

 

cheers!

:)

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What feels most comfortable, where your fingers have just been, and where they need to go next. Enjoy! B)

 

PS There's one harmony I like that involves playing two buttons with one finger, but it's reaching across rows, rather than up or down.

 

PPS I almost exclusively use the Anglo for song accompaniment, so speed is not of the essence.

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Using one finger for two buttons is ok. Frank Edgley teaches the technique on his DVD as does John Williams (no, not the Star Wars theme guy the other one).

For example push the E on the left hand with your middle finger. Then bend the finger a bit so it can hit the B, too. It's a nice power chord. Another good one is to push the A in the accidental row on the left and hit the E, too. Try it with all of your fingers. In alot of cases, you can get something good. In some cases, though, it sounds pretty bad. Experiment. Enjoy.

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Also note that you may only want to use a couple, or even just one, note to suggest the harmony. If you are playing a tune in the right hand, a full-blooded fistful of notes in the left for every chord will swamp the melody as there is no way to moderate the volume of the "ends" of the concertina independently of each other.

Samantha

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No doubt this list of chords is very helpful but as tina said - it can't be complete. There are many possibilities to play the same chords on the push or pull. And you do not always need the full harmonies.

 

Since you played guitar you will certainly know what notes make a special chord, e.g. D major ist D-F#-A. This helps you to try and find out how the chords sound on the concertina and how to do it. You will find some fingerings more difficult as others and you'll prefer the one or other sound of the same chord. If you play for example an E minor you could play E on push and enclude low E and low B and low G or replace these by higher E-B or G. Just try find find out.

I wish you pleasure and patient neighbours ;)

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If it were up to me I would not advise you to use one finger to cover two buttons. It tends to flatten your fingers out, to risk missed notes, and to slow down your chord changes. Fingering chord shapes can seem strange and awkward at first, but as with your guitar experience you will soon get used to the finger contortions (they're just different from guitar or mando) and find you can move easily from one to another. Practicing chord changes on their own will help.

 

Samantha is right that two-finger 1-5 chords will often sound as good, or even better, than the full works. And I agree with everyone here who told you to experiment. Some of my best 'weird' chords have been discovered by accident or just messing about.

Brian

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would i be right in summarising that there is no particularly more useful fingering pattern than finding what fits best?

 

Works for me. :ph34r:

 

Another thing I'd say is not to approach a piece thinking "OK, these are the chords," and feeling that you have to play every change. The concertina can hint at, or suggest chords, just by playing a couple of notes (and, as has been pointed out earlier in the thread, it often sounds better anyway). I don't think I could tell you what chord I was playing 99% of the time. I'm a big fan of messing around until I find something that I like, but then English traditional song -- largely, an unaccompanied tradition -- lends itself to that, IMO, because there are no rules beyond a basic respect for the songs and the singers who passed them on to us.

 

Anyway, enjoy! B)

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thank you everyone, lots to digest there. but basically would i be right in summarising that there is no particularly more useful fingering pattern than finding what fits best?

Yes, up to a point. Different concertinas have different note layouts and button spacing, and people's hands come in different sizes, too. Having said that, there are certain chord fingerings that work best for most people, but since I don't think anyone has yet provided a chord chart with fingerings included, you're probably going to be finding them out for yourself.

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