Jump to content

48 Button Wheatstone For Sale


susan
 Share

Recommended Posts

48 Button Wheatstone for sale on Ebay

 

Please check the following link on ebay

 

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vie...em=180286157513

 

Dave Prebble has checked out this Concertina and has said there are no major problems !!

 

I'd be inclined to say there are plenty of major problems with that concertina ... from broken straps to crushed pinkie rest to badly patched bellows. If the internal condition is anything like the external condition then I would say there is plenty wrong with it... only my opinion! ... anyone else? :blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 Button Wheatstone for sale on Ebay

 

Please check the following link on ebay

 

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vie...em=180286157513

 

Dave Prebble has checked out this Concertina and has said there are no major problems !!

 

I'd be inclined to say there are plenty of major problems with that concertina ... from broken straps to crushed pinkie rest to badly patched bellows. If the internal condition is anything like the external condition then I would say there is plenty wrong with it... only my opinion! ... anyone else? :blink:

All easily addressed if you know what you're doing. What Dave probably meant was no serious issues such as warped reed pans, corroded reeds etc. that would be amjor issue for a repairer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Paul you're 100% correct. Maybe I should have explained myself a little better!

PS I'm also selling a WW2 RAF Irvin Jacket. Is there anyone out there who thinks I should mention it's a 63 year old dead sheep? ;)

 

Shouldn't that be a sheep that died 63 years ago? I would actually like to see the corpse of a sheep that lived 63 years. ;)

 

Alan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Folks,

 

Just to clarify matter a little. It is not being sold as a playing instrument but as a box needing restoration. Paul has it right .... no 'major issues' for a restorer or, I would venture, for a competant and patient handyman in posession of Dave Elliott's Concertina Maintenance Manual and the humility to ask for advice if they are unsure about something.

 

This instrument is exactly how restorers like to see them. Though it may look 'messy' now, importantly, It has not been badly messed about with, and is all there.

 

The brass reeds look to be of good quality and in very good shape with a few steel replacements. Secondhand brass reeds are not hard to come by. It will, of course, need retuning.

 

The bellows are reasonably sound with one previously repaired valley split and a few pinholes which will need patching. For preference I would probably rebind them and fit new papers but they can be made playable without this much work.

 

The Rosewood ends have a few cracks to repair, as is the case with most concertinas of this age and type. End bolts will need some attention and two or three replacements may be needed. Sanded back, a little filler and refinishing would result in a beautiful box.

 

The usual pads springs valves and bushes etc will need replacing.

Thumbstraps need to be replaced but the original strap screws are both present.

All parts needed to restore this instrument are available through Dave Leese and others.

 

With care and attention this will make a sweet sounding and good looking box. It will never be a strident instrument, though what it might lack in volume should be made up for in mellow rounded tone.

 

That is about as far as my memory takes me but if you have any other questions, feel free to drop me a PM and I'll do my best.

 

Regards

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also looked at this box, it's brass reeded with some steel reeds - generally as is described on ebay. The box is nicely molded and has all the hallmarks of a once quality instument including the original reedwork.

 

Unfortunately the ends are messed about with, with woodscrews replacing, or beside the original end bolts. This took the instrument away from re-furbishment into restoration, and for a brass reeded wooden ended instrument (no matter its former glory) it probably would not wash its face as a commercially restored proposition. However, to someone who has the skills and wants to do the job for themselves, there is nothing that cannot be addressed.

 

If I wanted an instrument for a member of my family, I would not be put off by its condition.

 

Dave E

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...