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Unicycling Concertinists


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Phew ... I'm a little worried ... I started learning to play the concertina a few months ago (duet as it so happens)... and now I read all this. Does this mean that I have to take up the unicycle as well ??? :unsure:

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Phew ... I'm a little worried ... I started learning to play the concertina a few months ago (duet as it so happens)... and now I read all this. Does this mean that I have to take up the unicycle as well ??? :unsure:

 

Yep. Sorry.

And more and more of us ride the Unicycles out in the open. But that's OK, don't worry.

You'll just feel a little...mm... windy, that's all.

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You'll just feel a little...mm... windy, that's all.

 

Windy? Downright nervous is more like it :lol:

 

 

I'm generally feeling free onstage. Joking, talking, holding attention to my meager figure and people generally have good time. But when I'm onstage with accordion or concertina..., talking about nervous. Sweaty is not even close.

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Well, I have a unicycle...and I have a concertina..... In the 5 or so years that I've had the unicycle, I've never been able to actually ride it without putting my personal safety and the welfare of others near me into extreme danger. I've somehow missed out on the genes that allow both my parents to ride unicycles and touch their noses with their tongues, such a bummer.

 

On the other hand, in the month and some that I've had the concertina, I've gained relative competency and assurance that I'm doing pretty well.

 

I doubt that I'll be trying to combine the two anytime soon. Yes yes, I know, where is my sense of humor?!

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Phew ... I'm a little worried ... I started learning to play the concertina a few months ago (duet as it so happens)... and now I read all this. Does this mean that I have to take up the unicycle as well ??? :unsure:

Nope.
If you're playing a
duet
, you should be riding a
bi
cycle.
;)
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-I saw a commuting unicyclist last week, steady over a mile of stop-and-go, trackstands, fast & helmeted. The fellow conveyed confidence and gave up little to bicycles in exploiting gaps, stability, and to lesser degree- speed. It was easy to forget he operated in multiple axes. A harmonica & holder would serve for tunes and imitating trains when cut off by ignorant drivers. A loud Jeffries might serve too, but a fast air button and extra-long bellows should be standard to permit use of arms for balance.

 

-Does spoke layout or pedaling style distinguish traditional Anglo unicycle from English?

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Not long ago the Portland Oregonian flew a headline claiming that western Washington was a "hotbed of unicycle activity..."

Messers McCaskey, Weinstein, Allert, et al, is there something we should know?

I don't know about it being a "hotbed of unicycle activity;" I only saw one unicycle when I was in Seattle this weekend and that was in a group meeting on the topic of accordions (more or less). Now before anyone assumes that even a single sighting validates the notion, I have to clarify that I saw this at the annual Seattle Folklife Festival. It has been an annual event for 37 years now and claims it is the largest such free festival in the USA.

 

I saw quite a number of unusual sightings at this festival, and was particularly impressed with the number of piano-accordions that have been showing up in recent years. I lost track of the number I saw being worn on people's backs (sort of the reverse of the front wearing position) as they walked the grounds and I saw a number of people actually playing them too. This festival is all about music and I really enjoy it.

 

As to the unicycle sighting, I attended an event that was listed on the schedule as an "accordion panel" that turned out to be a half-dozen people talking about and demonstrating their "Harmonikas." In the middle of this a fellow with a unicycle came in the room and joined the audience for about 20 minutes. He didn't ride it into the room however, so maybe that doesn't qualify as a true sighting. I'm not at all sure if he was able to ride it on the grounds, the place was absolutely packed and most walking areas were plugged with people. Their website indicates that they anticipated 250,000 visitors and 7,000 musicians over the span of four days.

 

On the topic of "Harmonikas," I have to say I was pretty impressed. The people leading the panel all seemed to be into what I'd describe as Bavarian music and while I wasn't drawn to it, the low bass range of their instruments was incredible. All the Harmonikas demonstrated were button instruments, starting with a single row and including two and three row models. I'm not sure but I think there might have been one four-row model too.

 

Wish I would have been taking notes at one point; the panel started citing variations on the names/spelling of their instruments and said that if you went on YouTube and searched on the various spellings you'd get good examples of music and playing styles from different areas of the world.

 

By the way, I only saw two concertinas besides my own at this event.

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I don't know about it being a "hotbed of unicycle activity;" I only saw one unicycle when I was in Seattle this weekend...

I didn't even see that many when I was there a few weeks ago. :(

 

By the way, I only saw two concertinas besides my own at this event.

You'd have seen three if I was still there! :)

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