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No Concertina,,,yet


Bob Norris
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Well,

 

Still waiting for my 20 key G/D rental and my 30 key G/C to arrive soI went and ordered some stuff. Whaddya guys think of these two from the button box:

 

The Anglo Concertina Demystified - Bertram Levy

The most comprehensive tutor for the 30-button Anglo. Comes with 2 CDs

 

And

 

 

How to Play the Anglo Concertina - Frank Edgley

This DVD teaches the instrument, in gradual increments, from the basics, to playing with chords and embellishments. Included is a small booklet with charts, diagrams, and music. DVD

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Well,

 

Still waiting for my 20 key G/D rental and my 30 key G/C to arrive soI went and ordered some stuff. Whaddya guys think of these two from the button box:

 

The Anglo Concertina Demystified - Bertram Levy

The most comprehensive tutor for the 30-button Anglo. Comes with 2 CDs

 

And

 

 

How to Play the Anglo Concertina - Frank Edgley

This DVD teaches the instrument, in gradual increments, from the basics, to playing with chords and embellishments. Included is a small booklet with charts, diagrams, and music. DVD

They are both good resources from what I have seen. You'll probably want to start with the DVD just to get a better visual sense of what's going on. Both gentlemen are members of these boards, too.

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Well,

 

Still waiting for my 20 key G/D rental and my 30 key G/C to arrive soI went and ordered some stuff. Whaddya guys think of these two from the button box:

 

The Anglo Concertina Demystified - Bertram Levy

The most comprehensive tutor for the 30-button Anglo. Comes with 2 CDs

 

And

 

 

How to Play the Anglo Concertina - Frank Edgley

This DVD teaches the instrument, in gradual increments, from the basics, to playing with chords and embellishments. Included is a small booklet with charts, diagrams, and music. DVD

They are both good resources from what I have seen. You'll probably want to start with the DVD just to get a better visual sense of what's going on. Both gentlemen are members of these boards, too.

 

 

Hi,

 

Well the G/D came today,, I can make sounds but not much music :( I'm REALLY hoping the DVD's when they arrive will help me out. Any words of encouragement from the peanut gallery ;) Please

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Well the G/D came today,, I can make sounds but not much music :( .... Any words of encouragement from the peanut gallery ;) Please

Think of a tune you know well -- one that's not too fast. A song that you've known since you were a kid, maybe. For "quick win" purposes, the chances are that this tune either starts on the top button on the middle row, on either your left or right hand. Play the first three buttons on the middle row on your right hand hand, and try and hum the tune in the same key as you're playing. Then work out what the first note is, by a process of trial & error. Once you've established this, try and pick out the tune. You'll be amazed by how quick you get the hang of it. When you've got the hang of the tune, start faffing about with your other hand on the same row, and seeing what sounds OK. Occasionally reaching down to the lower notes in the "outside" row.

 

In a slightly refined version (i.e. I've been playing push-pull instruments since I was 13 or 14) this is exactly what I do.

 

If anyone fancies printing this off on a postcard, and selling it as an Anglo tutorial for the "English" style, feel free. :lol:

 

By all means wait for the DVDs, but don't rely on them too much -- there's only one person who can play the concertina in your own unique style, and that's you. So enjoy, and don't worry about the f***-ups too much. B)

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NB: If the tune you have in mind is a jolly little number, the chances are that you'll find the first note on the "push" of your bellows. If it's a bit more mournful, try starting on the "pull."

 

PS I'm sorry if this post, and my last one, are way below your musical abilities, and I sound a bit patronising. But it works for me. :blink:

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NB: If the tune you have in mind is a jolly little number, the chances are that you'll find the first note on the "push" of your bellows. If it's a bit more mournful, try starting on the "pull."

 

PS I'm sorry if this post, and my last one, are way below your musical abilities, and I sound a bit patronising. But it works for me. :blink:

 

Thanks,,

 

I play other instruments. My problem is i'm hands on however after learning the pipes this way and re learning correctly I want to make sure I'm doing things correctly. I'm hoping the dvd's will have the basics and visuals will go a long way. I know once I get going I will be fine, its just the getting going part I'm worried about :lol:

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My problem is i'm hands on however after learning the pipes this way and re learning correctly I want to make sure I'm doing things correctly. I'm hoping the dvd's will have the basics and visuals will go a long way. I know once I get going I will be fine, its just the getting going part I'm worried about :lol:

One thing the DVDs might show you is how to hold the thing without crippling yourself with RSI, etc. However (and I realise I'm opening a big can of worms here, but hey) one big difference between the pipes and the concertina is that traditional piping has been pretty much a continuous thing. The concertina has been "rediscovered" as a folk instrument -- certainly in the English tradition. In the English tradition, we have basically 2 players to work from -- William Kimber and Scan Tester, both of whom were pretty much tunes players, and definitely not song accompanists. This is unlike the melodeon, for instance, where there's a definite body of traditional playing to work from and within (should you choose to do so).

 

When it comes to my own playing, when I'm looking to accompany my voice (such as it is, after 20-odd years of smoking), what I'm trying to do is capture something of the harmonies and countermelodies I hear in my head, having been brought up in a family where singing was important (one set of grandparents were gypsies, the other lot were farm labourers, and all of them were Methodists ;) ). This -- in my opinion, anyway -- isn't something you can learn, although you can pick up tips and tricks about transferring what you hear in your head to your fingers. You have a musical heritage which is different to mine but of absolutely equal value, and it's absolute gold-dust, so use it, use it, use it, because if you don't it's gone forever.

 

Anyway. Go and play your concertina! B)

 

(This is me being a bit drunk and winding down before I go to bed, by the way. Apologies for the ramblings.)

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Levys tutor is a lot of fun, and will get you into chords right away. I have Frank's other book (II), and it is a good way to learn a lot of tunes, although some of them didn't really excite me very much. I think you chose really well, and need nothing else for a while. The John Williams vid is also good to get started.

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