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Can Someone Tell Me What Tune This Is Please...


free-feet
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jig.mp3

Sorry for the pooh playing. :blink:

Sounds like Dingle Regatta.

 

see attached file: Dingle_Regatta.pdf

and hear this poor sound file: dingle_regatta.mp3

 

Edited to add the mp3 file. I tried to upload a midi file, but this seems forbidden by the system, so I had to convert the original midi file 3kb to a poor mp3 file of 140kb. I could have renamed the original midi file, but that feels more or less like cheatin' :ph34r:

Edited by Henk van Aalten
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The person who taught me it said it was a jig and i thought it sounded a bit odd for a jig.

 

I just found it on... http://www.thesession.org/tunes/display.php/23 ...which is more in line with what i'm playing.

Why are you hesitant to call it a jig? Sounds like a jig to me. The abc notation at the above link is sloppy (it says the time signature is 12/8 but there are bar lines every 6/8).

 

There is no reason not to call this a jig. It is a jig.

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If you can say "Liverpool, Everton, Liverpool, Everton" in time to the music, it's a jig. If you can say "Liverpool, Everton, Manchester, Liverpool, Everton, Manchester," in time to the music, it's a slip jig. Or something. There are some other ones, but I can't remember them.

 

Oh yes, if it's played at 200mph, in such a way that no-one would have a cat in hell's chance of actually dancing to it, it's a reel. ;)

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Why are you hesitant to call it a jig? Sounds like a jig to me. The abc notation at the above link is sloppy (it says the time signature is 12/8 but there are bar lines every 6/8).

 

There is no reason not to call this a jig. It is a jig.

I was told it was a jig by the person who taught me it but to me it didn't feel at all like a jig. Which was the reason i wanted to know the name of the tune so i could find out where it was from or what was different about it. Thesession says it's a slide, as do other places, and that's certainly more in fitting with what the tune feels like it should be to me.

 

Just my opinion, please don't shoot me for it. :unsure:

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A slide is a type of jig.

 

From http://www.madfortrad.com/jigs.htm:

 

There are three types of jigs in Irish music the most common type being the 'double jig'. The double jig is in 6/8 time with two strong accents in the bar. The second type is the slip jig; it is in 9/8 with three strong accents in the bar. Slip jigs and double jigs might be played in the same set of tunes because though they are different (three accents instead of two) they are played at a similar tempo and have a similar feel.

 

The third type is the 'single jig' -more commonly called the 'slide'- and it is in 12/8. The slide has a very different feel with four accents over the twelve beats: it has a great swing and is played quite fast. Slides are mainly associated with the Sliabh Luachra area on the Cork/Kerry border.

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From http://www.irishtune.info/rhythm/:

 

Slide...

 

 

Uninitiated listeners, of which there are many, and even some tune-book editors have mistaken slides as hornpipes, single jigs, polkas, or double jigs, since slides share various traits with each. Once you know a few, you realize they are distinct from any of those.

 

The tempo is rather quick, often in the 150 bpm range, if you were to count each heavy-light pair as a beat. But in practice each beat of a slide (counting around 75 bpm now) gets two pulses, which is either a heavy-light pair or a fairly even triplet – not a jig pattern. Thus if all four group-halves in a bar were triplets – which is uncommon –, you'd have a twelve-note bar. The ratio of heavy-light pairs to triplets in a slide is slightly in favor of the pairs. Most slides break the pattern once or twice in a tune by delaying the strong note for a bar's second group until that group's second half, creating a cross-rhythm with respect to the foot taps. Other unique characteristics of slides are not necessary additional information for identifying them – only for playing them!

 

Note that slides are peculiar to the Southwest of Ireland, and some are directly related to double jigs, single jigs, or hornpipes played elsewhere in Ireland. Musicians quite familiar with slides are generally unfamiliar with single jigs, and some otherwise respectable authorities on the slide have rashly and mistakenly pronounced that single jigs "are the same as slides." On the other hand, some musicians simply use the term "single jig" to mean "slide," and are unaware of the existence of the distinctive single jig rhythm in Irish music. Over the course of the 20th century the customary notation for slides shifted from 6/8 to 12/8, which I think is an improvement in accuracy. However, I have given bar counts for slides here according to the 6/8 notation, for the very practical reason that the set dancers count them that way!

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I guess we come at this from very different backgrounds.

 

I am, at core, a contradance musician. If it goes "humpty dumpty" or "higgledy piggledy" or some combination thereof ("georgie porgie pudding and pie") then it's a jig. While I've always been aware that the Irish break the classification down into many types of jigs, the distinctions were never important to me.

 

I now see, by reading this thread, that the distinctions are region-specific. What they call a slide on one side of a hill they call a single jig on the other. If you say so. I know nothing of Irish step dancing (haven't even seen Riverdance all the way through).

 

I think any american contradance musician will say this tune sounds like a jig. I suspect that's why the guy who taught it to you did.

 

Edited to add:

 

In keeping with above, all my life I have been playing tunes with names like "O'Keefe's Slide" and "Denis Murphy's Slide" as jigs.

Edited by David Barnert
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I guess we come at this from very different backgrounds.

 

I am, at core, a contradance musician. If it goes "humpty dumpty" or "higgledy piggledy" or some combination thereof ("georgie porgie pudding and pie") then it's a jig. While I've always been aware that the Irish break the classification down into many types of jigs, the distinctions were never important to me.

 

I now see, by reading this thread, that the distinctions are region-specific. What they call a slide on one side of a hill they call a single jig on the other. If you say so. I know nothing of Irish step dancing (haven't even seen Riverdance all the way through).

 

I think any american contradance musician will say this tune sounds like a jig. I suspect that's why the guy who taught it to you did.

 

Edited to add:

 

In keeping with above, all my life I have been playing tunes with names like "O'Keefe's Slide" and "Denis Murphy's Slide" as jigs.

I was under the impression that Single jigs were epitomized by tunes like "Off She Goes" which while having some similarities to slides in that both make more use of quarter notes than is common in double jigs, slides are played quite differently with more emphasis on the first note of each group of three eighth notes and much less on the next two giving the tune nearly a 4/4 feel to it out of the 12/8 time where Single jigs tend to emphasize the eighth note after the quarter where the Long-short Long-short pattern is in effect, giving it much more of a three note orientation. almost as if it were 3/8 time.

I played New England contras for many years and found the switch to Irish rhythms instead of their Americanized versions quite a challenge, While the tunes are written out the same way, they sure aren't played the same over there.

I wont' pretend to be an expert on definitions, but while you can play slides as Jigs and often visa versa, Tunes written originally as slides take advantage of the emphasis placement in slides and seem to make a bit more musical sense when played that way. My opinion only,

Dana

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