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Wheatstone 64 Key


KeithB
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Just in case you haven't heard these Bass Concertina tracks before?

 

You don't know what love is" by G. de Paul, arr. W. Wakker.

played on a (single action) bass concertina.

 

http://www.concertinaconnection.com/youdon'tknow.mp3

 

It's from this page:

 

http://www.concertinaconnection.com/bass.htm

 

This one is interesting too:

 

http://ia300103.us.archive.org/2/items/The...LibertyBell.MP3

 

Cheers

Dick

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Just in case you haven't heard these Bass Concertina tracks before?

 

 

http://ia300103.us.archive.org/2/items/The...LibertyBell.MP3

 

That one sounds familiar to me - I'm thinking it might be Lea Nicholson off a record he made in the late 1970s of absolutely amazing concertinz music.

 

wg

I posted that, and then checked by backing up a directory on that Web page - yes, it's definitely Lea Nicholson's record. If you can possibly get a copy, you should - or listen to the MP3s there of the Brandenburgs and other stuff. I was given a copy in 1981 by a musician who said he thought it was the best concertina playing anywhere, and I agree with him.

Edited by Wendy M. Grossman
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  • 2 months later...
I owned a concertina of the same specification but with ebony ends - that's the one I had stolen in 1984. I don't know how many were made but I assume it's more than two.

 

wg

Preliminary results show that between May of 1923 and July of 1943 approximately 123 Baritone-Trebles were produced, but only 33 were made of the model 16 (64 keys) with ebony ends. I don't know if any BTs were made prior to 1923. Although they are listed on a Wheatstone price list from 1920, the first citation I found in the production ledgers is 29678.

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Lea has his own website and downloads are available- as is the CD of the Concertina Record, from Jamring.com

 

Could I have seen him in about 1977 at the Cambridge Folk Club in the Portman Arms? I certainly saw A concertina wizard there and he looked like Lea, as best I can remember. (I went to his website and immediately thought it might well be him)

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Preliminary results show that between May of 1923 and July of 1943 approximately 123 Baritone-Trebles were produced, but only 33 were made of the model 16 (64 keys) with ebony ends. I don't know if any BTs were made prior to 1923. Although they are listed on a Wheatstone price list from 1920, the first citation I found in the production ledgers is 29678.

 

Greetings.

 

I have in my possession a 64-Key with ebony ends serial no. 23926, but it is probably a Contrabass - the lowest note is the C 2 octaves below middle C, and the keys are arranged so that the normal fingering is in the tenor range. In the baritone/bass range everything is the wrong way up, if that makes sense. After a while you begin to understand why it was necessary to invent the Duet system.

 

23926 seems to be between the period of the Wayne and Dickinson ledgers. Steve D said he hadn't seen another one like it the last time that I took it to him.

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Preliminary results show that between May of 1923 and July of 1943 approximately 123 Baritone-Trebles were produced, but only 33 were made of the model 16 (64 keys) with ebony ends. I don't know if any BTs were made prior to 1923. Although they are listed on a Wheatstone price list from 1920, the first citation I found in the production ledgers is 29678.

 

Greetings.

 

I have in my possession a 64-Key with ebony ends serial no. 23926, but it is probably a Contrabass - the lowest note is the C 2 octaves below middle C, and the keys are arranged so that the normal fingering is in the tenor range. In the baritone/bass range everything is the wrong way up, if that makes sense. After a while you begin to understand why it was necessary to invent the Duet system.

 

23926 seems to be between the period of the Wayne and Dickinson ledgers. Steve D said he hadn't seen another one like it the last time that I took it to him.

 

That sounds very like the one I had. If my name and then address are stamped inside the end it *is* the one I had. :) (If you ever want to sell it...)

 

Only 33 of them made! Damn!

 

wg

Edited by Wendy M. Grossman
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Preliminary results show that between May of 1923 and July of 1943 approximately 123 Baritone-Trebles were produced, but only 33 were made of the model 16 (64 keys) with ebony ends. I don't know if any BTs were made prior to 1923. Although they are listed on a Wheatstone price list from 1920, the first citation I found in the production ledgers is 29678.

 

Greetings.

 

I have in my possession a 64-Key with ebony ends serial no. 23926, but it is probably a Contrabass - the lowest note is the C 2 octaves below middle C, and the keys are arranged so that the normal fingering is in the tenor range. In the baritone/bass range everything is the wrong way up, if that makes sense. After a while you begin to understand why it was necessary to invent the Duet system.

 

23926 seems to be between the period of the Wayne and Dickinson ledgers. Steve D said he hadn't seen another one like it the last time that I took it to him.

The Model#16 Baritone-Treble had a range of F2 to C7 using a piano as a reference. That would be F below the bottom line of the Bass stave up to C above the 5th line above the treble stave. Your instrument goes down to C2, which is also the lowest note on a cello. Mike.

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Preliminary results show that between May of 1923 and July of 1943 approximately 123 Baritone-Trebles were produced, but only 33 were made of the model 16 (64 keys) with ebony ends. I don't know if any BTs were made prior to 1923. Although they are listed on a Wheatstone price list from 1920, the first citation I found in the production ledgers is 29678.

 

Greetings.

 

I have in my possession a 64-Key with ebony ends serial no. 23926, but it is probably a Contrabass - the lowest note is the C 2 octaves below middle C, and the keys are arranged so that the normal fingering is in the tenor range. In the baritone/bass range everything is the wrong way up, if that makes sense. After a while you begin to understand why it was necessary to invent the Duet system.

 

23926 seems to be between the period of the Wayne and Dickinson ledgers. Steve D said he hadn't seen another one like it the last time that I took it to him.

 

That sounds very like the one I had. If my name and then address are stamped inside the end it *is* the one I had. :) (If you ever want to sell it...)

 

Only 33 of them made! Damn!

 

wg

Well, I wonder how many of the original 123 still exist. Hobgoblin in Manchester has one. Mike

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  • 3 months later...
I owned a concertina of the same specification but with ebony ends - that's the one I had stolen in 1984. I don't know how many were made but I assume it's more than two.

 

wg

Preliminary results show that between May of 1923 and July of 1943 approximately 123 Baritone-Trebles were produced, but only 33 were made of the model 16 (64 keys) with ebony ends. I don't know if any BTs were made prior to 1923. Although they are listed on a Wheatstone price list from 1920, the first citation I found in the production ledgers is 29678.

Hello folks,

 

I have one of these with ebony ends. It's number 29695 '. . 1923 I think, so again late 'best period. This one is an extended bass so is a 64 Key Treble Baritone. What a lovely box. It has been my companion for years.

 

I bought it from Crabb in 1974 for £180. He also had a TT for slightly more money - £190 I seem to recall.

 

No I won't sell it....

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I would love to hear the sound of that instrument, but that's not my call.

 

You can hear one almost exactly like it - ebony ends instead of wood - in this cut, recorded in 1980. (Sorry for the self-promotion.)

 

Sir Patrick Spens - http://www.compulink.co.uk/~wendyg/rosevil...trick_Spens.mp3

 

wg

 

And the rest of her album is here:

http://www.pelicancrossing.net/roseville.htm

 

Wonderful stuff. And Wendy also had her Wheatstone stolen:

"My concertina was stolen from a house I was renting in County Wicklow in the Republic of Ireland in 1984; it was a 64-key Wheatstone tenor-treble in great condition, very rare, and has my name and several of my old addresses stamped on the inside of the ends - " from http://www.pelicancrossing.net/folklist.htm

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  • 8 months later...

Not sure if I can pose for an expert, but simple and logical descriptions of Leonard makes perfect sense.

It's exactly what my Lachenal is - a transposing instrument. If you are used to play Treble, and will pick up my Lachenal, you'll automatically play 4 tones down. From C to F. It IS a transposing instrument, and that's why I bought it, to read as though it's Treble, but to sound lower and avoid high end squeak. Baritone is too low and therefore, too slow and "bellowy". So if offered instrument is indeed a Tenor and involves re-learning, I would expect much less interest in such from your common cash strapped concertina enthusiast or reseller. Rich player/collector is another thing.

 

After I posted the above, I read that it was sold to a player/collector. Spectacular match!

Edited by m3838
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