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richard

Different Linota Models...is There Difference

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Hello

I just acquired a Wheatstone Linota made between 1930 and 1933. I compared it to my teacher's Linota which was made in 1925.They were different in many outward details and also had a different sound. I am wondering what the significance might be of these differences. I wonder if any of the differences are related to the dates, and/or the standard of quality (for example one is a standard model, the other a "deluxe")

 

They both are metal ended. On mine the end plates cover the entire end surfaces. On the other (1925 Linota) the end plates cover the end surface but have about a 1/3 inch ebony molding going around the perimeter.

 

The metal on my end plate seems to be slightly less substancial with a more "steel like"look (as opposed to the earlier Linota which had a warmer "silver" look.

 

The "carved" design on the older model is more ornate.

 

The end plates on the later linota are the same and interchangable. By this I mean each had two holes for the air button (or a drone) on the other side. So it seemed the same end plate was manufactured so it could be used for both sides.

 

The end plates on the older Linota where different and unique for each side of the concertina.

 

The older model's tone is a bit denser, not as bright. The proud owner feels it's tone has more overtones.

 

If anyone is familiar with these differing details and their significance I would be curious to know.

 

I was wondering what effect the depression had on the features and quality of the instruments. Perhaps some external detailing were sacrificed to keep the prices down?

 

What do you know, and think?

 

Thanks a lot,

 

Richard

Edited by richard

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Richard, can you give us the serial numbers? It would be interesting to see what difference, if any, there is between the entries for the two instruments in Wheatstone's ledgers.

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Hello

Edited by richard

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Hello

 

This is from Richard.

 

The number of my Linota ( from between 1930 and 1933) is #32695.

I don't have the number of my teacher's instrument presently.

 

I tried the photo again but it is too big to fit

 

 

 

Thanks

Richard

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Here is a photo of Richard's Linota.

 

(He forwarded me a copy of his too-big photo, which I have reduced for posting.)

post-9-1076234296.jpg

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The number of my Linota ( from between 1930 and 1933) is #32695.

I don't have the number of my teacher's instrument presently.

Richard, the entry for your instrument in the Wheatstone ledger has the following information, which isn't much:

 

Dated Feb. 3, 1932.

55 as a model number.

"N P", indicating nickel-plated ends.

"Rose", indicating that the woodwork supporting the metal ends is rosewood.

30 keys.

 

The potentially interesting item is the model number, as many ledger entries for anglos only say "A.G." (for Anglo-German), with no model number, and I've never seen a pre-WWII Wheatstone brochure or price list that included model numbers for anglos, so the only way to tell what they mean is to compare them with actual instruments.

 

If/when you get the serial no. for your teacher's Linota, it will be interesting to see what model number it has. Different model numbers for Englishes and duets indicate differences in design, range, and quality.

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I've never seen a pre-WWII Wheatstone brochure or price list that included model numbers for anglos, so the only way to tell what they mean is to compare them with actual instruments.

 

 

In that case, you might find the following useful, it is a list of Model Numbers, and their descriptions, from a (circa 1934) "Price List of Superior New Model Chromatic Anglo Concertinas, Manufactured by C. Wheatstone & Co." :

 

MAHOGANY - Screwed notes, steel reeds, 5-fold bellows, including case.

 

No. 51.-20 Keys ... ... ... ... £4 11 6

No. 52.-26 Keys ... ... ... ... £4 19 6

No. 53.-30 Keys ... ... ... ... £5 7 6

 

ROSEWOOD - Quality and finish as No. 55.

 

No. 55A.-20 Keys ... ... ... ... £6 0 0

No. 55B.-26 Keys ... ... ... ... £7 10 0

 

 

No. 55.-30 Keys. Superior quality. Rosewood, best French polish, round top nickel-silver keys, bushed throughout, dark morocco six-fold bellows, screwed notes, best tempered steel reeds, Square case £8 10 0

No. 56.-32 Keys. Ditto Ditto £9 0 0

No. 57.-36 Keys. Ditto Ditto £10 5 0

No. 58.-40 Keys. Ditto Ditto £11 10 0

 

Nickel-plated Tops [Ends] to Nos. 55, 56, 57 & 58, £1 5s. extra.

 

 

No. 59.-30 Keys. EBONY, finest finish, solid dark morocco six-fold bellows, spherical end silver keys, bushed throughout, screwed notes, extra superior steel reeds, improved action, giving rapid articulation. Square case. £10 10 0

No. 60.-32 Keys. Ditto Ditto £11 5 0

No. 61.-36 Keys. Ditto Ditto £12 10 0

No. 62.-40 Keys. Ditto Ditto £13 15 0

 

Nickel-plated Tops to Nos. 59, 60, 61 & 62, £1 10s. extra.

 

TENORS, BARITONES and BASSES

Made to Order in No. 59 quality only.

Edited by Stephen Chambers

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Thank you, I'll have a no. 62, please. My cheque for £13.15.0 is in the post.

 

Chris (weeping in his beer)

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Thank you, I'll have a no. 62, please. My cheque for £13.15.0 is in the post.

And I'd like a bass no. 59, thank you.

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Thank you, I'll have a no. 62, please. My cheque for £13.15.0 is in the post.

And I'd like a bass no. 59, thank you.

 

Now don't forget that metal ends are £1,,10s EXTRA on those models ...

 

But seriously, the £1,,5s metal ends (of a No. 55. etc.) would have been the less-expensive kind, like Richard's, that extend to the instruments edge. The £1,,10s ones (of a No. 59. etc.) were inset, with an ebony border, like his teacher's (the fretwork would also have been finer).

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And I'd like a bass no. 59, thank you.
Now don't forget that metal ends are £1,,10s EXTRA on those models ...

Actually, I was considering a special request for amboyna, not metal. :)

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In that case, you might find the following useful, it is a list of Model Numbers, and their descriptions, from a (circa 1934) "Price List of Superior New Model Chromatic Anglo Concertinas, Manufactured by C. Wheatstone & Co." :

 

MAHOGANY - Screwed notes, steel reeds, 5-fold bellows, including case.

 

No. 51.-20 Keys ... ... ... ... £4 11 6

No. 52.-26 Keys ... ... ... ... £4 19 6

No. 53.-30 Keys ... ... ... ... £5 7 6

How fascinating...a year or two ago, I encountered a model 51, a 20-key C/G "Linota" with mahogany ends with a late 1934 serial number. It was in need of restoration, but the reeds were indeed very good. Interesting to know that it cost £4 11 6. (a fair amount of money in those days)

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Hello

This is Richard the lad who initiated this thread. I have the basic information concerning the other Linota which I was comparing mine to. It is:

 

#30439

1925

Linota model #88

36 button, NP, C/G

 

Thanks

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It is:

Linota model #88

 

 

Hi Richard,

 

I've been looking at these ledgers for years, so I can tell you that the 88, in the column beside the serial number, is the batch number (for factory purposes, marked on the component parts during construction). The model number is the 61 beside the date, and if you look at the price list I posted, you will see that No. 61. is indeed a 36 Key in "Ebony, finest finish".

 

Cheers,

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Richard,

 

I have one of these model 61 "ebony" 36 keys from the 20s and can confirm that they are exceptional, even among Linotas. I like mine so much that I have kept it in its original pitch (around A=453), so as to disturb the original Wheatstone reedwork as little as possible. I know some prefer the 30 keys and some prefer the 40 key models, there is room for different tastes, but this is a very good period.

 

I know Stephen knows this but to clarify, the "ebony" in the case of your teacher's instrument refers to the casework veneers/molding and the "NP" indicates the metal ends. Mine is "just" ebony - I guess ebonized sycamore - ends.

 

Stephen,

 

Thanks for the great price list; do you have anything similar from 1928? Did prices or models change much from year to year in this period?

 

Paul

Edited by Paul Groff

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