Jump to content

Advice Please - Midrange Anglo


Recommended Posts

Folks I'd love to give my mother a chance to try out the concertina, she loved playing with my Tedrow over the holidays. I was trying to find a solution for her. She is in last 60s, healthy but I dont want her to strain with stiff bellows and unresponsive reeds. Is there a midrange concertina (other than the Stagi) that folks can recommend. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some truth in that. The only way to get an instrument of the quality of a Tedrow is to the pay the price of a Tedrow. If you intend to pay less then the current general consensus seems to be the Rochelle from Concertina Connection is a very good bet. I believe Bob Tedrow and the Button Box both sell it on that side of the Pond.

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some truth in that. The only way to get an instrument of the quality of a Tedrow is to the pay the price of a Tedrow. If you intend to pay less then the current general consensus seems to be the Rochelle from Concertina Connection is a very good bet. I believe Bob Tedrow and the Button Box both sell it on that side of the Pond.

 

Chris

 

Chris, while I liked the sound of the Rochelle, I found its bellows to be very stiff. After a period of several months of almost daily playing they never did "break-in". I eventually sold it and kept my Stagi, which was much easier to play, though did not have the sound of the Rochelle.

 

I read someone else's thread a few weeks ago about the benefits of the Rochelle, but that person stated that you have to expect some break-in time. My experience was that the time could be lengthy, measured in many, many months or longer. Again, this is just my experience, but if you're concerned about stiff bellows and price, a used, but tuned-up Stagi from the Button Box might be the way to go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some truth in that. The only way to get an instrument of the quality of a Tedrow is to the pay the price of a Tedrow. If you intend to pay less then the current general consensus seems to be the Rochelle from Concertina Connection is a very good bet. I believe Bob Tedrow and the Button Box both sell it on that side of the Pond.

 

Chris

 

Chris, while I liked the sound of the Rochelle, I found its bellows to be very stiff. After a period of several months of almost daily playing they never did "break-in". I eventually sold it and kept my Stagi, which was much easier to play, though did not have the sound of the Rochelle.

 

I read someone else's thread a few weeks ago about the benefits of the Rochelle, but that person stated that you have to expect some break-in time. My experience was that the time could be lengthy, measured in many, many months or longer. Again, this is just my experience, but if you're concerned about stiff bellows and price, a used, but tuned-up Stagi from the Button Box might be the way to go.

 

Just realized I responded to the wrong person. Sorry, Chris. Screech, my message was meant for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your mom might do very well with a vintage 20b instrument. One that has been properly reconditioned has these advantages:

 


  1. Traditional concertina sound
    Usually light weight
    Bellows are easy to use
    With proper care will last another lifetime

 

Disadvantages:


  1. Some of the Lachenals have buttons too far from the palm rest for small hands
    Accomodation to keys and tune settings need to be made because of lack of accidentals

 

Many of the Lachenals and Jones instruments (not all) had decent reeds and sound and play well when set up properly.

 

A factor for the aspiring player of fast Irish music is that the bellows on many of these 20b instruments are not up to the task of responding quickly (efficiently) enough to changes in direction. But I'd be surprised if your mom will notice this or find it limiting.

 

If this seems like a good fit for your mom, contact me. I have reconditioned over a dozen 20b for workshops. I have a few extra quality instruments available priced from $450. to $700.

 

Greg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you think your mom will be around forever? While you may have the time for adjustment, choosing the instrument and going from cheap to expencive, your mom does not.

Give her the best, something you will not allow yourself. At least give her your Tedrow. She deserves it.

Now that we figured this problem, let's talk about the instrument for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you think your mom will be around forever? While you may have the time for adjustment, choosing the instrument and going from cheap to expencive, your mom does not.

Give her the best, something you will not allow yourself. At least give her your Tedrow. She deserves it.

Now that we figured this problem, let's talk about the instrument for you.

 

I agree with my west coast friend here, it was definitely my first thought when I read the initial post.

 

Alan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, give her the Tedrow, this is your chance to palm that funny old anachronism off on her and get yourself a duet.

 

 

(seriously, if she's going to have trouble with the bellows wouldn't an English be a better idea?)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, give her the Tedrow, this is your chance to palm that funny old anachronism off on her and get yourself a duet.

 

 

(seriously, if she's going to have trouble with the bellows wouldn't an English be a better idea?)

 

I'm teaching my mom (80yo) to play G/C diatonic accordion. So far she had my best A/D Hohner. But she is up to the level, where she needs to do cross fingering and quick push/pulls, and the Hohner, though with beautiful sound, has become too slow and it hurts her shoulders. So right now I'm checking the Lilly from the Button Box. The idea was to have easy flexible bellows and quick reed responce. To my surprize I found the Lilly's bellows rrather spongy and stiff. The sound and looks are excellent, but the bellows just kill the idea. So I myself at a loss right now, figuring out what to do. I can't go into "play it and it will eventially brake in". There is no "eventially", the time it now.

Anybody got some quick pesky up-scale G/C, well used, but sitting unplayed?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well, if you have the money to buy yourself another tedrow, then you could lend her yours in the meantime. if not, it's a hard call...

 

the rochelle is wonderful because it is cheap and playable--even though it is playable, it is still quite cheaply built, and as such, is klunky and hard to play. the hohners and others like them are cheap and not playable. from your description of the stagi being too stiff, the rochelle is a definite no--i cant play them at all.

 

if you cant afford to get yourself a replacement, you could loan your concertina to her for a while. i am sure this would make her happy, as you would have to visit more often to see your concertina! you could visit her too, in the mean time :). as painful as it might sound to have a long term loan of your main instrument out, i could think of no greater show of love for someone who is surely a wonderful lady.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...