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Anglo: Song Accompaniment Tips & Tricks


meltzer
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I'm a big fan of the "drone" effect you can get on a 30k C/G box (without a drone key ;) ), using the g/a key on the C row in conjunction with the a/g key on the chromatic row. (Try it with O little town of Bethlehem for something seasonal.) Also, using that "g" on the draw can give a nice effect at the end of a song in a minor key that finishes on a draw "d" on the C row, finishing on a nice strong fifth giving the impression of a key change.

 

Apologies if these are very basic, or if you just think they sound crap. :blink:

Edited by meltzer
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I like "Silent Night" done in octaves. It sounds rich, and while not exactly chords, does get me into the habit of using both hands. Part of the piano score I have for "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" uses that technique as well, and I am finding I can make most of the given piano chords with out a lot of trouble, plus I don't have to think out the chord structures like I do with a fake book. Admittedly, it does help I already read music.

 

Alan

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I like "Silent Night" done in octaves. It sounds rich, and while not exactly chords, does get me into the habit of using both hands. Part of the piano score I have for "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" uses that technique as well, and I am finding I can make most of the given piano chords with out a lot of trouble, plus I don't have to think out the chord structures like I do with a fake book. Admittedly, it does help I already read music.

 

Alan

 

On the other hand, I am forcing myself to think about where an alternative note is in order to keep the push or pull of the melody going along with the written chord. In the first measure, for instance, the melody is starting with d, and the written chord is a b and g (key is g). So instead of using the pull d in the C row on the right hand like I would do just playing the melody, I've switched to using the push d in the g row on the left hand for that first note. I am also using the push A in the accidental row of the right hand occasionally instead of the draw A in the G row for similar reasons.

 

Alan

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I find that much of the anglo song accompaniment I do creates harmonic voices much the way I arrange choral music- rather than octaves or "boom-chick" chords, I have my fingers sing along in thirds, fifths, etc., with little diddly bits at ends of phrases, or over long-held notes in the melody. It's still very much a work in progress, but I mostly subscribe to the K.I.S.S. principle... ;)

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