Jump to content

Hello


Recommended Posts

Hello, I'm new to your forum, and to the world of concertinas in general.

I have been playing the fiddle for about 7 years or so, and always loved the sound of the concertina, as well. So, this summer after seeing one up close, I decided that I HAD to have one...... I did some research, and decided I'd like to try the English system, as I don't think I could figure out two notes per button!

 

If anyone has advise for me, I'd love to hear it. I'm a bit daunted by the whole thing, it's quite different than strings! I'm excited though, to join another musical community.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is your price range? I made the transition from mandolin to concertina without too much heartache. If your budget is around the $300 range, I would suggest a Jackie or Jack. I bought my Jackie from Ebay and feel like it has a very nice sound for the price. It's not a Wheatstone, but it was what I could afford. The more experienced players in this forum will probably have more sound advice and some other questions, like what kind of music do you want to play and others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello and welcome. The forum is a wonderful place, full of lively debate and friendly advice. Take a bit of time to browse through the various sections and read up on the many questions previously posted about the relative merits of the various types of concertina - English isn't the only type with the same note push and pull. Then there's the hoary question of where you start. New/secondhand/vintage instrument; cheap and cheerful, mid priced workhorse, bespoke handmade antique of the future. The list goes on...

 

Give us a rough idea of where in the world you are and the kind of music you are interested in. There may be a c.net member close by who can give you a little guidance and perhaps let you 'have a go' to see if your interest will ever amount to anything and help you decide on the concertina type/price range that's best for you.

 

I would echo Nicholas' advice regarding the Jack (baritone) and Jackie (treble - same range as the violin), good basic instruments at a very reasonable price. They hold their value so you would loose little of the modest outlay if you decide the concertina isn't for you.

 

So pull up a chair - and as a newbie it's your round at the bar! :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks.

I've been thinking I'd like to get a 48 button Stagi from the Button Box. Tenor or treble, I'm not sure which, but at the moment I'm leaning towards the treble.

 

The music I'm interested in is mainly historical, celtic and maritime. I'd like to be able to play and sing, as well a melody instrument and chords, etc.... I first heard the concertina on recordings of sea chanties, and fell in love with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You'll find that a 48 key English treble has the same range as your fiddle, and you can play from the same sheet music. Matter of fact, as sheet music for concertina is almost unknown here, I find most of my music in the violin section at the music store! Right now I'm working on some klezmer duets and trios, playing the violin part on concertina with some oboe and clarinet players.

 

The English concertina is an excellent and versatile instrument for playing melodies and harmonies, although I think the Anglo is probably better for accompanying vocals.

Edited by yankeeclipper
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interestingly enough, my partner Anne is moving in the opposite direction. After 25 years as an English concertina player she has taken up the fiddle. Well, it takes all sorts ...

 

You might also like to have a shufty at the Concertina FAQ at www.concertina.info.

 

Welcome and have fun,

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome, Fern. As you can see from my join date, I'm new to these forums as well. They're a friendly enough bunch.

 

Can't offer you much in the way of advice box-wise, cos I'm a push-pull player who can't read music in any meaningful sense.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have recently picked up the English concertina. I am a fiddler too. I think the most exciting part of learning a second, very different, melody instrument is learning new things that are directly relatable back to the fiddle. It’s been a pleasant surprise.

 

I am filling gaps that I didn’t know existed. In a way it’s like watching a good movie twice; the second time you see things you didn’t see the first time through. And, as the fiddle isn’t stuck under my jaw, I am starting to sing along...and, get this, now that I can sing and play the concertina at the same time, (somewhat) I find that I can sing (sort-of) that same song while playing the fiddle. I couldn’t do that before. I feel as if I am breaking the mind/fingers/mouth lock that I have been nurturing for years. Very exciting.

 

Oh, yes, one more thing. I had a stagi. I found it very taxing on my wrists and thumb. The bellows dont move easliy. You might try the Jack or Jackie. I never have but perhaps they are easier than the Stagi. I could only play a few minutes in the begining with out discomfort. I have the Albion now and love it. You need to pay attention and watch out for that cronic injury stuff early. Break yourself in slowly, breath, stretch and try to avoid over doing it in the begining.

 

And don't forget your fiddle.

 

randy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll probably end up getting a treble, since I'm not too sure about learning another clef at the moment.... Also, it's more in my voice range, alto/2nd soprano.

 

As for the Stagi being hard to work, I tried one (a tenor), and goofed off for a while, mostly making hideous noises. It didn't sem too hard, but then, I don't really know what to look for as far as feel goes. Like I said, I have "beginner" written all over me in big, red letters. :blink:

 

And don't worry, I'd die beore I gave up on my violin!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll probably end up getting a treble, since I'm not too sure about learning another clef at the moment.

 

I'm also a fiddler who took up English concertina. They're habit forming: I play both treble and baritone and some day will probably spring for a tenor-treble as well.

 

Most of us who play from dots use treble clef no matter what range of English concertina we're playing. Music written (or arranged) for tenor or baritone will usually use treble clef, with the baritone sounding an octave lower. I suppose if you wanted to read viola parts you might use alto clef for a tenor. Most of the time I use the same tune books I use for fiddle.

 

I picked up a crane duet and have been working on reading the bass clef for the left hand. Sort of like piano score. Hard for a fiddler, though I'm making some progress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I picked up a crane duet and have been working on reading the bass clef for the left hand. Sort of like piano score. Hard for a fiddler, though I'm making some progress.

 

Well, here's the cleff-free version of music notation, sort of "hybrid".

My_score.jpg

 

Now if only I could come up with a software automatically transposing existing notation into this one, we would be once and for all free from discrepancies between lower and higher octave and get rid of Cleffs.

Note, how clear and simple the notation becomes, and how little re-learning is needed, if any.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...