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hi, i'm an absolute beginer and was wondering if anyone knew of any tutors/teachers in the manchester area just to get me started. i would also appreciate it if anyone knew of any websites with details of the 20 button anglo C/G (stagi) layout, to let me know. i can read music a little bit but it's taking me ages to find out which notes are which. thanks.

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Hi,

 

If you don't find anybody, I'd try to get a copy of this book.

 

Anglo Chromatic Concertina by Roger Watson.

 

Amazon have one copy left at the moment.

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Handbook-Anglo-chr...719&sr=8-31

 

There other concertina books.....and I'm sure many on this group will say that there are better ones, but for an absolute beginner it really is hard to beat.

 

Although it is written for a 3 row concertina lots of the content applies to a two row.

 

You know, you might find somebody who could help you if you do some research on the internet into your local Morris dance sides....lots have anglo players. I'm not to sure about your local sides but I'm sure you'd find somebody that way.

 

Hope that helps.

Phil

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If it's a C/G 20 button, then you have two rows of buttons. The far row is C, the near row is G.

 

On the C row, right hand, starting from the button that your index figer touches (1st button, nearest the ceiling!) the push notes are C E G C E

 

On the left hand, starting with the button nearest the ceiling, the push notes are G E C G E

 

If you imagine folding the concertina so that the two keyboards made one long keyboard, therefore, the push notes, starting from the lowest in pitch, would be E G C E G / C E G C E

 

That's simply a repeating pattern of C E G, which is the three notes of a C major chord. See what they did there? ;0)

 

From that start, a little experimentation should find you the other notes by ear.

 

On the G row, the push notes are a repeating pattern of G B D which are the notes of the G major chord.

 

For a easy start and to build confidence, pick out melodies on the right hand, on the C row. You will find that any handful of 2 or more notes on the left on the C row will give you a C major chord accompaniment.

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Hi,

 

If you don't find anybody, I'd try to get a copy of this book.

 

Anglo Chromatic Concertina by Roger Watson.

 

Amazon have one copy left at the moment.

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Handbook-Anglo-chr...719&sr=8-31

 

There other concertina books.....and I'm sure many on this group will say that there are better ones, but for an absolute beginner it really is hard to beat.

 

Although it is written for a 3 row concertina lots of the content applies to a two row.

 

You know, you might find somebody who could help you if you do some research on the internet into your local Morris dance sides....lots have anglo players. I'm not to sure about your local sides but I'm sure you'd find somebody that way.

 

Hope that helps.

Phil

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hi, i'm an absolute beginer and was wondering if anyone knew of any tutors/teachers in the manchester area just to get me started. i would also appreciate it if anyone knew of any websites with details of the 20 button anglo C/G (stagi) layout, to let me know. i can read music a little bit but it's taking me ages to find out which notes are which. thanks.

Hi Sally,

 

Welcome to the Forum. As a matter of interest, what type(s) of music were you hoping to play?

 

Regards,

Peter.

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hi, i'm an absolute beginer and was wondering if anyone knew of any tutors/teachers in the manchester area just to get me started. i would also appreciate it if anyone knew of any websites with details of the 20 button anglo C/G (stagi) layout, to let me know. i can read music a little bit but it's taking me ages to find out which notes are which. thanks.

 

Jubilee Concertinas in Chorley are mostly English, with a couple of Anglo players and a duet, they should at least be able to get you started.

 

Link to Jubilee

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Hi,

 

If you don't find anybody, I'd try to get a copy of this book.

 

Anglo Chromatic Concertina by Roger Watson.

 

Amazon have one copy left at the moment.

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Handbook-Anglo-chr...719&sr=8-31

 

There other concertina books.....and I'm sure many on this group will say that there are better ones, but for an absolute beginner it really is hard to beat.

 

Although it is written for a 3 row concertina lots of the content applies to a two row.

 

You know, you might find somebody who could help you if you do some research on the internet into your local Morris dance sides....lots have anglo players. I'm not to sure about your local sides but I'm sure you'd find somebody that way.

 

Hope that helps.

Phil

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hi, i'm an absolute beginer and was wondering if anyone knew of any tutors/teachers in the manchester area just to get me started. i would also appreciate it if anyone knew of any websites with details of the 20 button anglo C/G (stagi) layout, to let me know. i can read music a little bit but it's taking me ages to find out which notes are which. thanks.

Hi Sally,

 

Welcome to the Forum. As a matter of interest, what type(s) of music were you hoping to play?

 

Regards,

Peter.

i was going to learn the irish style because that would please my parents but the more i research this instrument the more i'm finding out about how versatile it is. i think i just want to learn to play the basics first then decide on the type of music.

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If it's a C/G 20 button, then you have two rows of buttons. The far row is C, the near row is G.

 

On the C row, right hand, starting from the button that your index figer touches (1st button, nearest the ceiling!) the push notes are C E G C E

 

On the left hand, starting with the button nearest the ceiling, the push notes are G E C G E

 

If you imagine folding the concertina so that the two keyboards made one long keyboard, therefore, the push notes, starting from the lowest in pitch, would be E G C E G / C E G C E

 

That's simply a repeating pattern of C E G, which is the three notes of a C major chord. See what they did there? ;0)

 

From that start, a little experimentation should find you the other notes by ear.

 

On the G row, the push notes are a repeating pattern of G B D which are the notes of the G major chord.

 

For a easy start and to build confidence, pick out melodies on the right hand, on the C row. You will find that any handful of 2 or more notes on the left on the C row will give you a C major chord accompaniment.

 

 

thanks, thats helped a lot :)

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hi, i'm an absolute beginer and was wondering if anyone knew of any tutors/teachers in the manchester area just to get me started. i would also appreciate it if anyone knew of any websites with details of the 20 button anglo C/G (stagi) layout, to let me know. i can read music a little bit but it's taking me ages to find out which notes are which. thanks.

Hi Sally,

 

Welcome to the Forum. As a matter of interest, what type(s) of music were you hoping to play?

 

Regards,

Peter.

 

as before but really i just want to able to make people dance!

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i was going to learn the irish style because that would please my parents but the more i research this instrument the more i'm finding out about how versatile it is. i think i just want to learn to play the basics first then decide on the type of music.

I hope that this will not be information over-load, but these links might be of use to yourself (or anyone else learning a 20 key Anglo).

 

Briefly, in order, the links below give you:

 

20 key Anglo keyboard layout.

The Tune-o-Tron Converter, to convert ABC notation into a midi file, or sheet music.

A key transposer, to convert ABC tunes in "more difficult keys" into C or G.

A comprehensive archive of Morris tunes in ABC format.

A comprehensive archive of Irish tunes in ABC format.

 

http://www.concertina.com/anglo/index.htm

 

http://www.concertina.net/tunes_convert.html

 

http://www.8ung.at/abctransposer/

 

http://www.themorrisring.org/more/Tunes/index.html

 

http://www.thesession.org/

 

Hope that this is of some help.

 

One further point; if you learn to play in the Irish style, much of the melody will find its way onto the left hand of the instrument. If you learn in the English style, virtually all of the melody can be played on the right hand, leaving the left hand free to play chords etc. Might be worth bearing in mind if you try to learn both styles simultaneously.

 

Keep us posted with your progress, and remember that there is a vast army of players, on C.net, happy to answer any queries.

 

Regards,

Peter.

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Sally,

 

There are broadly two contrasting styles of playing Anglo.

 

The Irish style concentrates on playing the melody, with plenty of ornamentation but only occasional use of harmony. Usually, the tune is played in the middle range of the instrument, and uses the fingers of both left and right hands. As Irish music is commonly played in the keys of G, D or A, but is played on a C/G instrument, the technique often involves playing across the rows, rather than simply going up and down. Someone more used to the Irish style than me may be able to comment on whether you would find the lack of the third "accidental" row a problem for playing in this style.

 

The other style, "harmonic" or "English" (although it's not just English of course) tends to keep the tune mostly on the right hand with the left hand playing chords (although sometimes the tune may drop onto the left hand for a few notes).

 

The two styles are very different, both in terms of technique and the sound they produce. To get an idea of the different styles, and what the instrument is capable of in the right hands, get hold of Anglo International, a triple CD featurinng players from all over the world.

 

If you get in touch with Morris musicians, the chances are they'll play harmonic style. If you really want to play Irish, you could try contacting one of the Manchester Irish Clubs, or the local branch of Comhaltas Ceoltoiri Eireann

 

I'm in Cheshire and could possibly help get you started, but I play harmonic style, and Irish style is a mystery to me:D If you want to get in touch, send me a personal message

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