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New - Norman 36 Button G/d No. 507


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Well I've had some time to get used to my new Andrew Norman G/D 36 button Standard Anglo and I am absolutely delighted with it. Great button action, really nice sound, and it sits nicely in my hands. Well worth both the money and the wait. Couldn't recommend Andrew's craftsmanship highly enough.

 

Here's some pics for your perusal....

 

post-1809-1186527154_thumb.jpg post-1809-1186527238_thumb.jpg

post-1809-1186527263_thumb.jpg post-1809-1186527290_thumb.jpg

post-1809-1186527317_thumb.jpg post-1809-1186527348_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

- W

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So Woody, the first thing you did when you got your new toy was to take it to pieces! :P

 

Nicely designed layout, and I like the way the bushing board is integral with the action rather than part of the end casing. I was somewhat surprised to see the accordion reeds, I don't know why but I thought Norman concertinas were traditionally made; I've no idea what kind of price range they fall in. Are they comparable with Marcus/Morse then?

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So Woody, the first thing you did when you got your new toy was to take it to pieces! :P

Ah no. I've had it for a month & been too busy playing it to get round to taking pictures until now. :)

 

Nicely designed layout, and I like the way the bushing board is integral with the action rather than part of the end casing. I was somewhat surprised to see the accordion reeds, I don't know why but I thought Norman concertinas were traditionally made; I've no idea what kind of price range they fall in. Are they comparable with Marcus/Morse then?

Similar price range - the 30 button Anglo comes in around £1200 I believe, and the 36 button Standard cost me £1445. I've tried many others in a similar price range, and while for me the Marcus standard was very nice (for some reason I preferred it to the Special{?}), the one make that's always stood head & shoulders above the others for me has been the Normans. You've also got a wider choice of Anglos with his 30 & 36 button Standards, the equivalent models in his Jubilee range and 13 button miniature.

 

The down side is that you have to be prepared to wait. I believe that the Music Room has Morse's in stock, Marcus take a few months - sometimes less, whereas Andrew Norman's waiting list worked out at 14 months for me - now likely to be exacerbated now he's moved to Shropshire, due to time required to setup his new workshop.

 

Edited to add....

 

....I just thought that I should add that I think it was well worth the time I had to wait for such a nice instrument.

Edited by Woody
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Well I've had some time to get used to my new Andrew Norman G/D 36 button Standard Anglo and I am absolutely delighted with it. Great button action, really nice sound, and it sits nicely in my hands. Well worth both the money and the wait. Couldn't recommend Andrew's craftsmanship highly enough.

 

Here's some pics for your perusal....

 

post-1809-1186527154_thumb.jpg post-1809-1186527238_thumb.jpg

post-1809-1186527263_thumb.jpg post-1809-1186527290_thumb.jpg

post-1809-1186527317_thumb.jpg post-1809-1186527348_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

- W

 

I have a 30 key G/D Norman with Wheatstone top row - it is bright and very quick. Much better value than the average Lachenal. What are your extra notes at the beginning and end of the G row and at the beginning of the D row?

 

David

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I have a 30 key G/D Norman with Wheatstone top row - it is bright and very quick. Much better value than the average Lachenal. What are your extra notes at the beginning and end of the G row and at the beginning of the D row?

 

David

Hi David,

 

see this thread for the final layout and some of the discussion that lead up to it.

 

So far I've found the most useful buttons to be the B/A on the right-hand side D row, and especially the E/D on the right-hand side G row.

 

For playing the tune on the right and the chords on the left I think that should I ever order another Concertina, the E/D button would be my number 1 choice for an extra button - it really simplifies the whole process for many tunes.

 

cheers,

 

- W

Edited by Woody
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Sorry. What I meant was that I have trouble smoothly moving between five buttons in a row using four fingers. Six or seven buttons in a row seem beyond my expected level of potentialy learned dexterity. My fingers are wide and short, very useful for opening jar lids and maintaining a tight grip, but not of a form often seen on the hands of the best musicians. The hair on my knuckles simply demonstrates that I don't wear it all off by dragging them on the ground all the time.

 

You have a very nice instrument there Woody. Can you tell me anything about your technique for moving up and down the row?

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Having had a quick twiddle on this box yesterday at the Dartmoor FF I think Woody's got a nice box. The buttons have a more extreme rake than any other concertina I have ever seen, but I got used to that in seconds. Love the right hand D/E button, similar to my Dipper modified Jeffries. Great to have a concertina in this price range that has it.

 

Chris

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Sorry. What I meant was that I have trouble smoothly moving between five buttons in a row using four fingers. Six or seven buttons in a row seem beyond my expected level of potentialy learned dexterity. My fingers are wide and short, very useful for opening jar lids and maintaining a tight grip, but not of a form often seen on the hands of the best musicians. The hair on my knuckles simply demonstrates that I don't wear it all off by dragging them on the ground all the time.

 

You have a very nice instrument there Woody. Can you tell me anything about your technique for moving up and down the row?

Well basically I hold my breath & go for it! :ph34r: :ph34r:

 

Actually moving down the scale - for example ( from F#/G to E/D ) I use the index finger for both - hopping from one to t'other, as suggested by Chris Timson. I experimented with this approach and with moving all my fingers down or up the button row as required and found the 'hopping' approach slightly prefereable, but I think with practice either would be easily workable.

 

For the buttons at the other end of the row- I use my little finger for all of them. It seemed impossible to start with but with a lot of practice it's not too bad - your hand seems to stretch more with practice.

 

 

Having had a quick twiddle...

 

Well me luvver (language distorted by too much time spent in me home county over weekend) yerz welcome to have another twiddle :o on 10th September as I'ze descending on the Bradford session with a certain Mr. Dirge who's touring the UK in his capacity as (possibly) New Zealand's greatest Duet Concertina player of the 21st Century.

 

- W

 

 

p.s. OF course under the same criteria - the said Mr Dirge could also be considered (possibly) New Zealand's worst Duet Concertina player of the 21st Century - but we'll gloss over that :P

Edited by Woody
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Actually moving down the scale - for example ( from F#/G to E/D ) I use the index finger for both - hopping from one to t'other, as suggested by Chris Timson.

The reason I came up with this way of playing the button is that it maintains compatibilty with concertinas that don't have the extra button. It soon becomes easy to swap between them because the rest of your playing is unchanged. Admittedly fast bits that involve both the D/E and the G/F# buttons are more difficult, but you can still make use of the left hand D/E button in extremis.

 

Chris

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the said Mr Dirge could also be considered (possibly) New Zealand's worst Duet Concertina player of the 21st Century - but we'll gloss over that

EEEK! Lets stick with that for the moment, then I don't have to live up to anything.

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the said Mr Dirge could also be considered (possibly) New Zealand's worst Duet Concertina player of the 21st Century - but we'll gloss over that

EEEK! Lets stick with that for the moment, then I don't have to live up to anything.

 

 

But it is a lot to live down to. :)

 

Alan

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the 30 button Anglo comes in around £1200 I believe, and the 36 button Standard cost me £1445.

 

Yikes, best get my insurance for my Normans updated...

 

Glad that you're pleased with it Woody. I think Andrew's instruments are really excellent boxes, and it's reminded me that I really need to get my C/G serviced!

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Glad that you're pleased with it Woody.

Extremely. Thanks once again for your help Stuart.

 

I think Andrew's instruments are really excellent boxes, and it's reminded me that I really need to get my C/G serviced!

Handy now he's moved a lot closer to you :)

Edited by Woody
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