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Sound Comparisons - Tedrow And Edgley


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Curious if anyone would care to share their overall sound "style" comparisons of Frank's and Bob's concertina's. Frank and Bob possibly you would be willing to share if there is a particular type of sound you are trying to achieve?

 

In this case I'm really asking a pretty general overview. For instance listening to sound/video clips I could find on the net, it seems like Frank's trying to get a sound that I've heard described as "Nasal" or maybe "honking", where Bob's seem to be more...I dunno maybe clean/straight/tight?

 

For sure I have been able to tell with 100% accuracy (so far, administered blind by my wife) which clip is from which concertina.

 

So...thanks for any feedback.

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To my ear Frank's concertina sound has a similar sound to the Suttner sound clips. Suttner describes concertinas with metal ends as having more overtones. I know Frank has wood fretted concertina, I wonder if it has a different sound.

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To my ear Frank's concertina sound has a similar sound to the Suttner sound clips. Suttner describes concertinas with metal ends as having more overtones. I know Frank has wood fretted concertina, I wonder if it has a different sound.

 

I don't know which sound files you have listened to on the web. But you can listen to a number of different players and different instruments on this site:

 

http://www.anglo-concertina.net/links.htm

 

Bob and Frank both have recordings of themselves playing their own instruments.

 

 

Lucy

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To my ear Frank's concertina sound has a similar sound to the Suttner sound clips. Suttner describes concertinas with metal ends as having more overtones. I know Frank has wood fretted concertina, I wonder if it has a different sound.

 

I don't know which sound files you have listened to on the web. But you can listen to a number of different players and different instruments on this site:

 

http://www.anglo-concertina.net/links.htm

 

Bob and Frank both have recordings of themselves playing their own instruments.

 

 

Lucy

 

 

Remember though Bob and Frank have very different playing styles and abilities as players. Frank plays in a traditional Irish style, while Bob's playing is something he learned in isolation and probably closer to wat is called english style playing. The most fair way of comparing them would be to get the two instruments together and have the same person play them. I've heard both men playing their own instruments, never at the same time though. And honestly, both men make a descent box. Which is better? That is ultimately for a buyer to decide.

 

Now, I do own a Tedrow, but I knew Bob, and I respected his work. I met Frank later, this past fall. He makes a nice concertina. In a different situation, I very well could have bought an Edgely. Say like if I had stayed in Michigan.

 

And one more point, there is more than sound to be considered. Feel, playability and looks all need to be considered. I don't care how great a box sounds, if the action doesn't feel right to you. And this is a comparison tht only you can make, though I feel both men make boxes with great playability.

 

One more thing--I have spent a good part of the last two days with Bob here in Dublin talking concertinas and demonstrating them to the public.

 

Alan

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i think my question would be the converse----i have a good handle on the sounds of the two makes and like both, can't get over how different they sound, which i think is really cool.....

 

but am unclear as to how fast and responsive the tedrows might be for itm dance music. i've played edgeleys and no doubt about it, they are super-fast....this is not meant disparagingly, but many of the testimonials on this issue (about any make) are not terribly helpful as they are frequently by beginner or intermediate-level players who quite understandably rave that their new hybrid is worlds faster than their stagi or whatever.....but for really fast, ceili-speed playing---i only know that the morse ceili and the edgeley, oh, and the norman (not a great option just now if buying in US$$$$ given the appalling exchange rate) cut the mustard for sure.....

Edited by ceemonster
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i think my question would be the converse----i have a good handle on the sounds of the two makes and like both, can't get over how different they sound, which i think is really cool.....

 

but am unclear as to how fast and responsive the tedrows might be for itm dance music. i've played edgeleys and no doubt about it, they are super-fast....this is not meant disparagingly, but many of the testimonials on this issue (about any make) are not terribly helpful as they are frequently by beginner or intermediate-level players who quite understandably rave that their new hybrid is worlds faster than their stagi or whatever.....but for really fast, ceili-speed playing---i only know that the morse ceili and the edgeley, oh, and the norman (not a great option just now if buying in US$$$$ given the appalling exchange rate) cut the mustard for sure.....

 

 

Bob had a box with him this weekend that he had just finished with an extremely fast action I think you may have liked. And it stayed in this area, so I think I will get to play it again. (Best thing about this weekend--I found another FOUR anglo players in the Columbus metro area that I didn't know--two playing Irish, one maritime player and a classically trained violinist just starting out, plus an engllish concertinist who currently holds my very old position of President of the Columbus Folk Music Society.

 

Alan

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I have played both makes quite a few times. As far as I"m concerned, both have speed of response that is tops (and construction etc., for that matter); no distinction for me. They sound different, yes. I concluded years ago that trying to distinguish tone/timbre of concertinas by written description is meaningless. Even recordings have limitations. There's nothing like trying them in person. The difficulty in doing so has been a challenge for many of us, so you have lots of company.

 

Ken

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;)

I have played both makes quite a few times. As far as I"m concerned, both have speed of response that is tops (and construction etc., for that matter); no distinction for me. They sound different, yes. I concluded years ago that trying to distinguish tone/timbre of concertinas by written description is meaningless. Even recordings have limitations. There's nothing like trying them in person. The difficulty in doing so has been a challenge for many of us, so you have lots of company.

 

Ken

 

I concur with Ken. Both instruments are different from each other and both are made by two fine gentlemen. I have tried Frank's instrument and I own a Tedrow Tobacco Sunburst Bb/F concertina (the "150 years behind times" model). Ultimately one has to decide which model suits one's own style of music and playing requirements.

 

When Bob opens up his email ... once he gets home... he will see that I am intending to place an order for two more concertinas ... a miniature concertina and an Ab/Eb pitch concertina.

 

Bob's concertinas suit my current purposes, my style of music .... Hey, Bob ... do I get a discount on my concertina order for plugging your 'tinas...how about a free carrying case?? Steel reeds??? :)

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When Bob opens up his email ... once he gets home... he will see that I am intending to place an order for two more concertinas ... a miniature concertina and an Ab/Eb pitch concertina.

 

Bob's concertinas suit my current purposes, my style of music .... Hey, Bob ... do I get a discount on my concertina order for plugging your 'tinas...how about a free carrying case?? Steel reeds??? :)

I would suggest that for ordering more than one at a time, he might offer you a "bulk discount". ;)

Unfortunately, there's not much bulk in a miniature. :(

:D
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In all fairness to Frank and Bob ...they both are great craftsmen... and both deliver fine instruments... within three to four months of placing one's orders. I have been discouraged by Toronto' top concertina players from even attempting to place orders with U.K's top concertina builders ... because the waiting lists are so long...long enough to keep these guys busy till the Lord comes again. My one friend ... a member of this forum...has been waiting for eight years for a C & R D....... concertina.

 

Sure....I would love to have a Steve Dickson Wheatstone and Dipper and a new Crabb and Carroll too... I would have to win two lottery jackpots...first, for the money (these concertinas are very expensive) and second, getting your order placed on top of the list. Patience is a virtue ... and I am no Job ... three to eight years is a very, very long time to wait. My current musical audience do not know who Wheatstone is or was ... they just want pleasant and uplifting music coming from my concertina. If I was going to one of the music festivals then of course I would love to have one of the aforementioned revered instruments in my hands.

Edited by Ben Otto
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Thanks for the reply's and feedback. Although I'm obviously pleased we've made a collective restatement of the high regard in which Bob and Frank are held, I had hoped to elicit an analytical discussion about design objectives, sound/tone comparisons and goal state for these two makers concertinas.

 

I guess I'll have to go off and sulk and wonder why if wine critic Robert Parker can describe a 2004 Chateau Margaux has having "a superb blue/purple color to the rim as well as sweet aromas of flowers, blueberries, creme de cassis and licorice... and a ....fabulous fruit intensity and silky-sweet tannin in the long finish..."

 

that a knowledgeable, less pompous (Parker self labels himself as the "World's most influential wine critic) and equally articulate member of this forum can't describe the humble sound of two distinctly different sounding concertinas. ;-)

 

I'm gonna try to pose my question in a different way.....

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Thanks for the reply's and feedback. Although I'm obviously pleased we've made a collective restatement of the high regard in which Bob and Frank are held, I had hoped to elicit an analytical discussion about design objectives, sound/tone comparisons and goal state for these two makers concertinas.

 

I guess I'll have to go off and sulk and wonder why if wine critic Robert Parker can describe a 2004 Chateau Margaux has having "a superb blue/purple color to the rim as well as sweet aromas of flowers, blueberries, creme de cassis and licorice... and a ....fabulous fruit intensity and silky-sweet tannin in the long finish..."

 

that a knowledgeable, less pompous (Parker self labels himself as the "World's most influential wine critic) and equally articulate member of this forum can't describe the humble sound of two distinctly different sounding concertinas. ;-)

 

I'm gonna try to pose my question in a different way.....

 

It is probably far easier to compare wine, or even guitars, than concertinas. The better guitars are still factory (note I didn't say best), making it somewhat impersonal to compare them, while this is still a fairly small community. When I bought my first concertina, there were no NA makers. No there is what, slightly more than half a dozen, and I have at least an acquaintence with most of them.

 

Secondly, these instruments are all hand made, and they are going to vary. All of these men are constantly working to improve their instruments. Even two factory made Martins of the same model are going to vary in how they sound, so how fair is it to compare two makers by only one of each of there instuments? I remember being in violin shop one time and the clerk had the young student turn her back while she played both instruments and had her play both instruments. With these instruments, this is probablly the most fair way to pick one.

 

Lastly, we don't have a think the vocabulary to compare concertinas in the way wine is compared. Wine coniseurs have had generations to develop their vocabulary. A lot of us learned in isolation, especially here in NA, and it has only been what, the last ten years or so that we've became more of a community, and a lot of that has been do to the internet. When I moved to Columbus, I only found one other concertina player, and she played a Wheatstone English. Given some time, maybe we will make the comparisons you want.

 

Alan

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