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Chris Drinkwater

Rolling Edeophones

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As for 12 sided anglos having imploding bellows, maybe this is why there are no Edeophone anglos.

Ah, but there are. This article mentions a set of three, albeit made by Wheatstone. (I even had the privilege of trying one of them many years back.) I thought there was another article on Concertina.com specifically about those instruments, but my quick search there didn't find it.

 

It would truly amaze me if there weren't more, though. Lachenal seems to have made every other kind of concertina on the Edeophone design. Maybe we should ask Chris Algar, Neil Wayne, and Colin Dipper how many Edeo anglos they have seen.

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Edeophones are good instruments, we shouldn't knock them.

They are, indeed, and I speak from experience.

 

Anne had one for many years, she changed it for an Aeola but only because the Ede had 56 buttons and the Aeola 48; she didn't want the extra weight.

'Twasn't necessarily just the extra buttons (and accompanying reeds, levers, partitions, etc.). I have just weighed an Edeophone and an Æola -- both 48-button Englishes with non-metal, veneered ends-- and the Edeo weighed in at 1241 g, while the Æola is a "mere" 1150 g. And my 48-button, 6-sided, "pinhole" Æola with solid ebony ends registers 1178 g.

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(1) Sell it to an unsuspecting new player, and invest in an Aeola.

(2) Buy an old-fashioned "wedge of cheese" shaped door stop, and park it under the correct side of the concertina.

(3) Slopes seldom run in two directions, so put the concertina down across the slope, rather than with it.

 

I'll leave you to work out which was the serious suggestion. :D

 

Regards,

Peter.

 

After recently playing an Edeophone for the first time I think the serious suggestion was no.1 :rolleyes:

Actually, (3) was the serious suggestion. I did sell my last Edeophone earlier this year. An excellent instrument, and it went to a good home.

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"After getting a pint of beer in the end of my Jeffries at Sidmouth many years ago"

I've never had beer poured into my concertina, although someone did once pour moscatel over it! (We move in different circles Al). Fortunately most of it stayed on the outside.

Then there was the occasion of the ceilidh club Christmes party when I left the concertina on the stage while some idiot did his party trick with a dartboard and a set of darts. You guessed. He missed the dartboard completely and harpooned the concertina. The dart went through one of the holes in the fretwork and stuck firmly in the wood inside!

At least I had the satisfaction of his party piece going down like a lead balloon.

Like Al says; put it in its box!

Edited by Dave Higham

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Actually, (3) was the serious suggestion. I did sell my last Edeophone earlier this year. An excellent instrument, and it went to a good home.

 

My comment was actually one of bitter disappointment. The Edeophone is perhaps the prettiest concertina ever made, the amboyna ended ones are exquisite. Perhaps I expected too much but I rather think I was treated to a poor example of the type. On this occasion I played several very indifferent Wheatstones, two brand new modern hybrids, one of which impressed greatly and the other much less so, and a variety of Lachenals. My undoubted favourite on the day was was a hexagonal metal ended Lachenal that was a joy to play and had it been realistically priced I would have bought it without doubt. To the best of my knowledge it still sits there in a glass case £100-150 overpriced. :(

 

Perhaps I encountered a less than perfect Edeophone with greatly inflated expectations. I did once own an Aeola however, maybe that spoiled me forever.

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Reading the collective wisdom of all the posts on this topic has convinced my to change my order for a new anglo Edeophone to a 10 sided 40 button anglo. The builder has provided a picture of how his 10 sided concertina looks like.

 

Thanks for the advice. I am certainly afraid of having a prospectve Edeophone rolling away from me or having the bellows imploding/exploding on me.

Edited by Ben Otto

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(1) Sell it to an unsuspecting new player, and invest in an Aeola.

(2) Buy an old-fashioned "wedge of cheese" shaped door stop, and park it under the correct side of the concertina.

(3) Slopes seldom run in two directions, so put the concertina down across the slope, rather than with it.

 

I'll leave you to work out which was the serious suggestion. :D

 

Regards,

Peter.

 

After recently playing an Edeophone for the first time I think the serious suggestion was no.1 :rolleyes:

Actually, (3) was the serious suggestion. I did sell my last Edeophone earlier this year. An excellent instrument, and it went to a good home.

 

Last Edeophone, Peter? Gosh, how many did you have? You've never told me you owned an Edeophone before. :( If I'd known, I'd have made you an offer for it, subject to a free wedge being included in the price, of course! Dutch concertina maker and player Wim Wakker prefers Edeophones to Aeolas. He says he changed his Aeolas for Edeophones and then converted them to rivetted action like the Aeolas. And as a maker as a well as player, I guess he's determined that, for him, the Edeophone, for what ever reason, is the better of the two instruments. And if Colin Dipper is of a similar opinion, then that's good enough for me. Now, where did I put that packet of blue-tack? :unsure:

 

Chris

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(Wheatstone Edeophone and Dipper Hayden photos found on C.net)

The photo of the Hayden is one I took for the Concertina FAQ. Don't want to sound sniffy, but that's where copyright lies.

 

Chris

Edited by Chris Timson

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Last Edeophone, Peter? Gosh, how many did you have? You've never told me you owned an Edeophone before. :( If I'd known, I'd have made you an offer for it, subject to a free wedge being included in the price, of course!

 

Chris

Hi Chris,

 

I didn't know that you also played Maccann (that was the one which I sold this year) :) .

 

The Edeophones which I previously owned were both English, but these were sold back in the early 90's, by which time I had acquired my little Wheatstone 48 key Aeola. Both Edeophones were 56 key key extended Trebles. Lovely instruments, with a wonderful, mellow, sound. Heavy, though, and I did not need the top notes.

 

All instruments were sold without wedges. This thread has given me an idea; if there is sufficient demand, maybe I should gear up for production.

 

Regards,

Peter.

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--

Just as I was about to suggest to Ben Otto that a 10-sider is probably almost as likely to roll when it's rocked as a 12-sider, Danny shows us how rollacious even the 8-sider is. :o

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<I'll stick with putting it back in the case.>

 

Ditto, or keep it on your lap. All my concertinas have a neck strap. When not playing and sitting, it frees your hands to sip a brew, arrange music, wait out a tune, without also having an Edeo to contend with

or the need to 'momentarily' set it down somewhere.

 

Using the strap allows you to drop your Edeo into a case with one hand and retrieve it. That makes it easier

to develope a habit of, "when not on the lap, it's in the case".

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Last Edeophone, Peter? Gosh, how many did you have? You've never told me you owned an Edeophone before. :( If I'd known, I'd have made you an offer for it, subject to a free wedge being included in the price, of course!

 

Chris

Hi Chris,

 

I didn't know that you also played Maccann (that was the one which I sold this year) :) .

 

The Edeophones which I previously owned were both English, but these were sold back in the early 90's, by which time I had acquired my little Wheatstone 48 key Aeola. Both Edeophones were 56 key key extended Trebles. Lovely instruments, with a wonderful, mellow, sound. Heavy, though, and I did not need the top notes.

 

All instruments were sold without wedges. This thread has given me an idea; if there is sufficient demand, maybe I should gear up for production.

 

Regards,

Peter.

 

Well, Peter, you know I only play English. You shoulda said it woz a Mccann, innit? I am really cheesed off now! ;)

 

Chris

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