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What's In Your Toolbox?


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There's nothing I like better than rummaging around someone else's toolbox; you can find out so much about a person in this most private of places. You might pull up short though and wonder 'what the devil is that doing in here?' People, you see, bring in tools from many disciplines that they feel comfortable with, that aren't normally associated with the work they are doing but just happen to do a particular job very well.

 

My first offering is an artist's tool called a colour shaper or clay shaper. This is much like a paint brush but the bristles are replaced by tips of silicone rubber in various shapes and degrees of stiffness. This wondrous tool is equally at home as a glue spreader (that the glue can't stick to) or a resilient but gentle tool for working leather repairs into bellows.

 

So what's in your concertina toolbox that we might be surprised by?

 

A teaspoon with the top half-inch of the handle bent 90˚ and ground to a fine edge - the ideal bodger's tool for lifting the old chamois seals in the end of bellows.

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A teaspoon with the top half-inch of the handle bent 90˚ and ground to a fine edge - the ideal bodger's tool for lifting the old chamois seals in the end of bellows.

 

Real bodgers use a screwdriver :lol:

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A teaspoon with the top half-inch of the handle bent 90˚ and ground to a fine edge - the ideal bodger's tool for lifting the old chamois seals in the end of bellows.

 

Real bodgers use a screwdriver :lol:

 

Maybe, but lazy bodgers find it much easier to bend a teaspoon! Plus, of course, it has a dual function: it's also quite handy for insinuating between bellows and action box frame when the two have got stuck together with years and years of gunk, nicotine etc.

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A teaspoon with the top half-inch of the handle bent 90˚ and ground to a fine edge - the ideal bodger's tool for lifting the old chamois seals in the end of bellows.

 

Real bodgers use a screwdriver :lol:

Please educate an ignorant Scandinavian - "bodger"? - my Mac's New Oxford American Dictionary and Oxford American Writers Thesaurus come with with "badger", "bodega", "codger", "dodger" and "lodger" :blink:

/Henrik

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"bodger" is a traditional English name for one who makes simple furniture, mainly chairs, from unseasoned timber.

 

Googling for "chair bodger" will turn up lots of information.

 

The current, pejorative, use of the word describes someone who takes shorcuts in making or repairing. For example using a screwdriver as a chisel, or another English favourite "the Birmingham screwdriver"

:lol:

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hi dave

you over looked the vat of canal water.ho.ho!!!

cplayer

 

Oh? what's that used for?

 

Dave

 

Accidental 'deep clean' of my Jeffries G/G in the Macclesfield Canal about 28 years ago. (Some folks have long memories eh Trooper ? )

 

I have since mastered more sophisticated techniques of restoration ;)

 

Dave

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"bodger" is a traditional English name for one who makes simple furniture, mainly chairs, from unseasoned timber.

 

Googling for "chair bodger" will turn up lots of information.

 

The current, pejorative, use of the word describes someone who takes shorcuts in making or repairing. For example using a screwdriver as a chisel, or another English favourite "the Birmingham screwdriver"

:lol:

 

 

Or in Mining Terms, a 'pit spanner' was a 14 pound sledgehammer

 

Dave

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So what's in your concertina toolbox that we might be surprised by?

 

I always carry a Swiss Army knife in my trouser pocket. That makes several straight screwdrivers, a cross-head screwdriver, a wood saw and a hacksaw, scissors and nail file (for treating the human side of the person-concertina interface), a magnifying glass for detailed inspections, tweezers, a toothpick, an awl (very sharp!), an angler's hook disengorger with a very useful notch in the end (for springs, etc.) - and of course two knife blades.

 

The only drawback is that you can only use one tool at a time, and the ergonomics are not all that great. But I haven't had a field failure of my concertina yet that I couldn't fix. And the knife has many more uses, even non-musical ones ;)

 

When I'm travelling, I complement the Swiss knife with a handy electrician's toolkit in a small leather case, which I once got in lieu of a fee for playing at the company social club that hosts our group practice evenings. This has two sizes of Phillips screwdriver, three sizes of straight screwdriver, and a pair of pliers with wire cutter. The case fits in my concertina box under the tina. The only added value is the pliers, but the screwdrivers are, of course, handier to use than those on the knife.

 

What I haven't carried hiterto is glue, but a small tube might fit in my electrician's kit - good idea!

 

Cheers,

John

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hi dave

you over looked the vat of canal water.ho.ho!!!

cplayer

 

Oh? what's that used for?

 

Dave

 

Accidental 'deep clean' of my Jeffries G/G in the Macclesfield Canal about 28 years ago. (Some folks have long memories eh Trooper ? )

 

I have since mastered more sophisticated techniques of restoration ;)

 

Dave

well dave how could I forget your version of" jeffries water music" in g/d

ho.ho.

trooper

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Are you thinking of a variation on that old Mae West line: "Are you that pleased to see me - or have you just got your concertina in your trouser pocket?"

;)

 

John

Excuse me but this is a thread for hardware not software. :P

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