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Where To Buy Plans And Reeds For Concertina

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I want to built a concertina. I don't find suppliers for plan and reeds. Is someone would help me?java script:emoticon(':(', 'smid_2')

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i have seen a this done before with very good results. There is a drawn exploded diagram of a concertina in the concertina maintinance manuel by daveid elliot link here: http://www.hobgoblin.com/local/bigpic.php?ID=GM4709

 

that is a good book i bourght it today out of interest and in case i might need it one day

 

what you absolutely will want to look at if you havent alredy

 

is this link:

 

http://web.telia.com/~u41321288/build/index.html

 

That shows a guy who makes one from scratch (however you may want to buy the bellows) press the link t the bottom that says enter the kitchen for a step by step story of how he did it

 

As for reeds you should decide what type of reeds accordion-type reeds or concertina reeds

 

many of the midrange makers such as morse use accordion reeds and i believe in particular "antonelli" reeds and heres a link for that: http://accordions.com/vociarmoniche/en.htm

 

or you can try and get reeds from http://www.concertina-spares.com/ but i dont know if they sell sets

 

 

Also you might want to talk to people about it first such as "Henrik Müller" hes a concertina.net member (the one who made the concertina in the link i sent you) before rushing into such a project

 

 

I hope this helps

 

as you are listed as new member i dont know how much you know so im sorry if i seemed at all patroniseing at all. Good luck

Edited by Jake of Hertford

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You haven't said what type of concertina you want to make, but as I've said before (in reply to a similar question last year):

 

If you want a "set of plans" for a traditional English concertina, you need look no further than the illustrations to Charles Wheatstone's 1844 Patent. Otherwise you can see how a German concertina is made here (but it's in German).

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Great thanks for your answers which are very helpfull for a french newbee ...with a very bad english...

 

For ten years, I try to play folk with a fiddle and I want to play the same music with the concertina. So, it seems, after a trip on the net, that the best model for me is Anglo.

 

"Cordialement à tous"

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I hope this helps

 

 

Those are some great links. I really like the photo essay on building the concertina from scratch, it shows just how many tools and parts you will need to build to get it going. The tina he builds looks very nice.

 

I'm planning to post my own concertina construction photos once I get my CNC set up again (all my "stuff" is in boxes from moving, CNC is not for Gypsies!)

 

The price tag on that set of Suttner reeds leaves much to be desired, Still its good to see the option is out there.

 

Thanks for the links.

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The price tag on that set of Suttner reeds leaves much to be desired, Still its good to see the option is out there.

 

Thanks for the links.

 

I think it is important to keep in mind that Suttner is, as far as I know, the only person out there selling full sets of traditional style concertina reeds. There only alternatives are 1. make the reeds yourself, and for a one of project, you might ultimately decide buying Suttner Reeds are far more economical in the long run. 2. Use accordion style reeds. The latter method is used by quite a few of the mid-priced instruments to good effect but generally produce a tone that, in the opinion of many, falls a little outside the tone produced by traditionally reeded instruments (though most agree they can sound very good and many prefer the tone to the traditionally reeded instruments).

 

--

Bill

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Another approach is to take the reeds from a wrecked concertina and build them a new home.

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The price tag on that set of Suttner reeds leaves much to be desired, Still its good to see the option is out there.

 

835 Euros for a 38 key = 11 euros a reed, £7.37. I suspect you'll pay that much or more for hand made accordian reeds in one off quantities.

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The price tag on that set of Suttner reeds leaves much to be desired, Still its good to see the option is out there.

 

835 Euros for a 38 key = 11 euros a reed, £7.37. I suspect you'll pay that much or more for hand made accordian reeds in one off quantities.

 

 

I'm here to tell you boys.... If Jurgen can deliver a good traditional reed frame with good reed tuned within +or - 20 cents for 15 or 20 dollars, you should jump on it like a chicken on a june-bug.

 

 

It takes me a real good HARD working hour to hand cut a brass reedframe, vent it properly, tap the holes for the screws, cut a steel reed, profile it to pitch, install it in the reedframe, and fine tune it.

 

 

Bob Tedrow

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835 Euros for a 38 key = 11 euros a reed, £7.37. I suspect you'll pay that much or more for hand made accordian reeds in one off quantities.

 

A bit of poor maths there, I think you'll find they're over 21 euros each. Material costs and an hours labour still make the price reasonable though. Even if they're CNC made, the tooling costs make this a realistic amount to pay.

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835 Euros for a 38 key = 11 euros a reed, £7.37. I suspect you'll pay that much or more for hand made accordian reeds in one off quantities.
A bit of poor maths there, I think you'll find they're over 21 euros each.

Nope.

There are two reeds per "key", or 76 reeds for a 38-key concertina. B) And €835/76=€10.99, to the nearest cent.

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I'm planning to post my own concertina construction photos once I get my CNC set up again (all my "stuff" is in boxes from moving, CNC is not for Gypsies!)

 

Excuse my ignorance ...but what is "CNC" ... I know that Wim Wakker employs the "CNC" too in his reed making? Is it a reed making machine?

Edited by Ben Otto

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Nope.

There are two reeds per "key", or 76 reeds for a 38-key concertina. B) And €835/76=€10.99, to the nearest cent.

 

Yep you're quite right of course, I really mustn't post before my first cup of coffee in the morning!

 

Ben, CNC machines are computer controlled. It may be a lathe, milling machine, woodworking router or any number of other production machines. Sophisticated, high speed and very accurate.

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I'm planning to post my own concertina construction photos once I get my CNC set up again (all my "stuff" is in boxes from moving, CNC is not for Gypsies!)

 

Excuse my ignorance ...but what is "CNC" ... I know that Wim Wakker employs the "CNC" too in his reed making? Is it a reed making machine?

 

The abbreviation CNC stands for computer numerical control, and refers specifically to a computer "controller" that reads computer programming language instructions (G-Code) and drives the machine tool, a powered mechanical device typically used to fabricate metal components by the selective removal of metal. CNC does numerically directed interpolation of a cutting tool in the work envelope of a machine. The operating parameters of the CNC can be altered via software load program.

 

Foxy - quoting Wikipedia.

 

(I was in there first but OE threw a hissy fit as perhaps Tallship's reply hit the deck at the same time as mine!)

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