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What Do You Do With A Drunken Sailor


Bob Norris
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...put him to work at polishing brightwork.

...throw him in the hold with the captain's daughter.

...tie him to the mast and give him five lashes.

 

I've also heard of a variant: "What do you do with a filthy baby?" -- Sung at a child's bath time.

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Hi,

 

Anyone have a recording of What do you do with a drunken sailor?

From the wiki entry for the song....

 

...The song is, as you may have guessed, nothing to do with sailors. Rather it is a euphemistic song describing amusing, unlikely and uncomfortable cures for male impotence; the "drunken sailor" is the flaccid male member. Once this is appreciated, the chorus "Hooray, and up she rises" takes on an entirely different meaning...

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From the wiki entry for the song....

 

...The song is, as you may have guessed, nothing to do with sailors. Rather it is a euphemistic song describing amusing, unlikely and uncomfortable cures for male impotence; the "drunken sailor" is the flaccid male member. Once this is appreciated, the chorus "Hooray, and up she rises" takes on an entirely different meaning...

 

Sometimes a drunken sailor is just a drunken sailor.

 

ocd

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From the wiki entry for the song....

...The song is, as you may have guessed, nothing to do with sailors....

Sometimes a drunken sailor is just a drunken sailor.

And at other times -- e.g., if he's drunk on watch -- he may be a danger to self, ship, and shipmates.

 

Which is why some of the more severe of the suggested punishments may have been among the most realistic... not at all the humorous exaggeration envisioned by the majority of those -- myself included -- who sing it. :(

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The entry from the wikipedia, "..The song is, as you may have guessed, nothing to do with sailors. Rather it is a euphemistic song describing amusing, unlikely and uncomfortable cures for male impotence; the "drunken sailor" is the flaccid male member. Once this is appreciated, the chorus "Hooray, and up she rises" takes on an entirely different meaning..." has got to be among the most ridiculous, ill-informed bits of nonsense ever to grace the entire WWW. And scholarship aside, what man would ever use the pronoun "she" to refer to his John Thomas?

 

Now, if you're planning to sing this song, Bob, put your concertina back in the case. It's a shanty, a worksong. In this case, one that demanded all hands on the lines, none on buttons or strings. Nearly all the authorties on the subject allowed that thsi was a "stamp and go shanty." Only Terry knew it as a capstan/windlass shanty. Hugill also added that it was the only shanty ever permitted in the "King's Navee."

 

It was almost always sung in unison, every man singing every word save tor the opening line of each verse which would be started by the shantyman.

 

And while I've known this song nearly forever, I don't perform it as I find the text too repititious. But I hope you enjoy singing it -- Tom

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The entry from the wikipedia, "..The song is, as you may have guessed, nothing to do with sailors. Rather it is a euphemistic song describing amusing, unlikely and uncomfortable cures for male impotence; the "drunken sailor" is the flaccid male member. Once this is appreciated, the chorus "Hooray, and up she rises" takes on an entirely different meaning..." has got to be among the most ridiculous, ill-informed bits of nonsense ever to grace the entire WWW.

You're probably right, but then again I heard the same story on the radio (the BBC no less :o ) the other day - so it must be true :blink:

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The entry from the wikipedia, "..The song is, as you may have guessed, nothing to do with sailors. Rather it is a euphemistic song describing amusing, unlikely and uncomfortable cures for male impotence; the "drunken sailor" is the flaccid male member. Once this is appreciated, the chorus "Hooray, and up she rises" takes on an entirely different meaning..." has got to be among the most ridiculous, ill-informed bits of nonsense ever to grace the entire WWW. And scholarship aside, what man would ever use the pronoun "she" to refer to his John Thomas?

 

Tom, I'm very grateful indeed that I had fully finished with the morning cupa joe when I came to your punch line. :lol: What a laugh I had. Brought the bulldog downstairs early and now he expects food and a good walk. Hope the skunks (4 and 2 legged variety) in the neighborhood have retired to their dens.

Edited by Mark Evans
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