Jump to content

Concertina Prices


Recommended Posts

I have said before on this site that I was lucky that when I bought my Jeffries Concertinas they were purchased at the right time and you would think now at an unbelievably low price.My decision to buy then would be the same now,a concertina hand built consists of hundreds of components,it is very labour intensified,it takes a person(s) hours to make a concertina.Just one reed with its base drilled and tapped in two places, a little clamp plate,the reed made and assembled and then tuned. On a thirty button anglo thats sixty plus a drone sixty two to make.The time goes on when you think about bellows etc.The facts are plain to see that hand built instrument prices will never go down they must only go up.I do not think that reed plates will take over from individual reed design although some of the Italian melodion reed plates are fantastic quality.If the World recession improves labour charges will go up.Is now the time to buy?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the World recession improves labour charges will go up. Is now the time to buy?

With the price of the dollar against the pound at a long-time low, a Morse or Tedrow would seem to be a good buy right now, but if you think the dollar will continue to drop, you might want to wait a little.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Hmmmmmm.

I have recently bought a Lachenal english treble 48 - rosewood ends, bone buttons, 5-fold bellows, original case, c 1918 by serial number.

The reason for purchase was that it seemed in fair nick and very underpriced !

Anticipating a potential profit I then went ahead and bought a flat-back bouzouki on E-bay.

The mother of my children is now raising the mother of all rows because I now own two more instruments ("Which you didn't need !") and have not yet commenced any arrangement for selling.

Meanwhile I already own a 150-y-o Wheatstone english, in need of some restoration after my owning it for nearly 35 years, but still more satisfying to play than the newer Lachenal, despite the odd leak in the bellows and a couple of dodgy valves.

Any sensible suggestions ? Would selling the Wheatsone be more sensible as at least I should make more profit, on an instrument which is also about the sixth on my list of those regularly-played ? - I'm primarily a fretted instrument player. I would rather have the Wheatstone reconditioned, both from sentiment and nostalgia.

 

And what would they be worth, either of them ? I do well understand it 's all dependant on finding the right buyer.

 

GP :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And what would they be worth, either of them ?

To suggest what they would be worth requires more information, and even then would be dodgy without a hands-on inspection.

 

Why do you think you would make more profit on the Wheatstone than on the Lachenal, if the Lachenal was a bargain? It sounds like you bought the Lachenal thinking it was underpriced, but now your not so sure that it was a bargain. Yes?

 

Why do you not like the Lachenal as well as the Wheatstone? Tone? Slow response? Something else?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, the Wheatsone cost me £4.50 back in1969 ! So any money would be profit .

Also I had it checked out by Crabb's at the time , who said it did need a bit of work but "the wood's good."

The Lachenal is without leaks and re-tuned, but heavier in its action - after playing it a bit I'm not sure I can tell much in tonal difference.

As I said before the concertina is not my first instrument, although I am enjoying playing one again, took it out to an informal session yesterday.

I would have thought a 150-y-o Wheatstone would be worth codsiderably more than an 80-y-o Lachenal, all other things being equal.

 

The other thing that occurs to me is -How much difference in value does a different model from the same company make ? Is it elsewhere on this site where there is an early price list, and there is an almost 10 X difference in cost between a basic instrument and the top-of-the-range model? How much is this variety reflected in current prices ? - all other things being equal, including finding a buyer who wanys your particular instrument.

 

GP

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just own one and don't have time enough for it! I figure it cost me, in current dollars, less than about $3,000, for the instrument, trades, repairs, everything. But let's go with $3,000. I've owned it or the one I traded in for part of the cost over 25 years (300 months). That is $10 per month or 33 cents a day. And, if I live that long, it has at least another 25 years to go. No way around it, you don't need a bargin concertina to get a bargin. They are all bargins. It is just the front end cost that bites a bit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kurt

 

I like your philosophy, an appreciating asset that has a life that will out last our own, yes cents per day.

 

mind you, all my concertinas seem to have a life of their own, at least when I play them

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Don't forget other price considerations. I just received my C&R Dipper 32 button Cotswold. Very similar to the one reviewed on this site. It took four years. I live in the US The week dollar presented a substantial increase in price along with a cost of $230.00 for customs and duties. The additional costs were shocking but I'm glad to have my Dipper. Oh Yeah!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



×
×
  • Create New...