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St Georges Day


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Isn't it British Racing Green derived from green symbolising Ireland? (something to do with an early motor race run in Ireland I think).

That and the fact that Britain had to choose a different colour to its usual national colours of red, white and blue, because those colours had already been taken by Italy, Germany and France respectively. It was originally for the 1903 Gordon Bennett Cup, which was hosted by Britain because the Napier team won it in 1902 (already in an olive green livery), but held in Ireland because motor racing was illegal in Britain at the time. So that year Napier raced in shamrock green as a mark of respect for their Irish hosts.

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British racing green is actually very dark in colour almost approaching black and it is a matt finish. I have seen a couple of Bentleys at Veteran Sports Car events at Brooklands that are the right colour. Steven although I like your car (I like Subaru's) and the colour it is too light to be "traditional" BRG :(

 

But I would prefer green to the templar flag that we call the english flag.

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Isn't it British Racing Green derived from green symbolising Ireland? (something to do with an early motor race run in Ireland I think).

You're quite correct.

 

Further to my earlier comment, although the 'official' BRG is rather boring IMO, the green as used by the 1960's (and beyond) racing Aston Martins is absolutely glorious! :) (Mind you, I'd like an Aston in any colour !)

 

I can't look at your car at the mo Stephen (damn company system, preventing photobucket access) but I'll have a look later - I had a 'go' in a Scooby on a track recently...terrific !

Edited by wolosp
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British racing green is actually very dark in colour almost approaching black and it is a matt finish. I have seen a couple of Bentleys at Veteran Sports Car events at Brooklands that are the right colour. Steven although I like your car (I like Subaru's) and the colour it is too light to be "traditional" BRG :(

Oh dear, this is starting to get complicated (and off-topic :rolleyes: )! ;)

 

British Racing Green can be (and has been) various shades, indeed at its first official outing in 1903 it was shamrock green and the winning 1902 Napier cars were olive green, as I mentioned. The words British Racing Green in my earlier post are a link to the Wikipedia article on the subject, which even includes colour charts. But the only car I've had in an "official" BRG was the MGB GT that I had in the 1970s, and that was the same bright shade as the Lotus Eleven replica in the article.

 

The reason the old Bentleys have a matt appearance is that their lightweight bodies are made of fabric stretched over a wooden frame.

 

The subaru.gif green is a metallic one, which probably makes it look brighter than it really is (but the mud tones it down! B) )

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Oh dear, this is starting to get complicated (and off-topic :rolleyes: )! ;)

 

British Racing Green can be (and has been) various shades, indeed at its first official outing in 1903 it was shamrock green and the winning 1902 Napier cars were olive green, as I mentioned. The words British Racing Green in my earlier post are a link to the Wikipedia article on the subject, which even includes colour charts. But the only car I've had in an "official" BRG was the MGB GT that I had in the 1970s, and that was the same bright shade as the Lotus Eleven replica in the article.

Oh good......... :unsure:

 

The wikipedia link is very interesting. I have four racing bikes in different shades of British Racing Green (all specified as BRG, and all painted by the same company!). One, I would have described as Brunswick Green (which I see can also be BRG). Confusing.......?

 

Wikipedia also mentions Selwyn Edge, who raced for my former club; Anerley Bicycle Club (founded 1881). I guess that he made the switch to cars when it became obvious that development would make them faster than bicycles! As we know, bicyclists were "Kings of the Road" in the 1880's and bicycles only affordable to the very rich. The cycle was repeated once "reliable" cars became available. How times have changed!

 

As we've wandered slightly off-topic, let's wander a bit further:

 

http://www.amberleymuseum.co.uk/index2.html

 

A grand day out, and one of the Bond films (the one with Grace Jones) was partly filmed at this museum.

 

Regards,

Peter.

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I had a Triumph GT6. Triumph were quite clear that it was conifer green, but everyone used to say '... and it's British racing green too!' when examining it.

 

I agree it's a dull colour. Bright metal and black is best for cars and concertinas (failing that, red. I was rather taken with that red tortoiseshell duet that came up for sale recently)

 

I presume this is the sort of freewheeling stuff that Theodore K was suggesting we isolate in another forum, but when I post on a long thread like this I'm working on the principle that only we juveniles are reading it by now anyway, so we can wander where the fancy takes us and no one is upset. Well, hopefully...

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I had a Triumph GT6. Triumph were quite clear that it was conifer green, but everyone used to say '... and it's British racing green too!' when examining it.

 

I agree it's a dull colour.

Well if you think that's dull; the MGB was (battleship) grey when I bought it, but I know the green was BRG because I got it resprayed that colour. It looked great in combination with the red leather interior, wire wheels and chrome grille! :)

 

Bright metal and black is best for cars and concertinas (failing that, red. I was rather taken with that red tortoiseshell duet that came up for sale recently)

I prefer dull gold and amboynawood for Aeolas myself, though I sometimes wonder if it's because the amboyna reminds me of the burr-walnut in my grandfather's Y-type MG, not forgetting the octagonal shape of the MG badge ... :unsure:

 

And strangely enough, I bought mine (off eBay) from somebody in Abingdon (the home of MG):

 

Aeolatenor-treble31205.jpg

Edited by Stephen Chambers
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I can't believe in anyone having a car like that when there are people with sticky Dipper keys to worry about.

 

I think gold's un petit peu pretentious, moi. (the old ones are the best; ooh that goes for squeezeboxes too. So many parallels...)

 

What is amboyna? Has it another name? I've never come across it anywhere else, but I agree it's beautiful.

 

(bet my fr. is wrongly spelt)

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Stephen,

 

I had one of those 1960 era MGB GT models myself. The spoke wheels didn't like the salty winter roads in upstate New York and I had to clean them frequently. Much more irritating than sticky concertina keys and not nearly as easy to remedy.

 

With a nod to the hosting forum; I decided some time back that I liked that dark, full-strength green color for concertina bellows and Mr. Tedrow kindly constructed an instrument for me with bellows of that hue. He didn't call it BRG, but I think it falls into the color range. Much more interesting than simple black and it goes well with brown and amber wood tones.

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I prefer dull gold and amboynawood for Aeolas myself, though I sometimes wonder if it's because the amboyna reminds me of the burr-walnut in my grandfather's Y-type MG, not forgetting the octagonal shape of the MG badge ... :unsure:

 

 

Aeolatenor-treble31205.jpg

Oh yes!!! I would not have given that red Maccann Duet houseroom, although I must admit that it was interesting to see it.

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Hi

Amboyna also known as New Guinea Rosewood (I've no idea where I got that from- probably a wood site) apparently 'often grown on Indian roadside for flowers and foliage.' whatever site I found this on also said it was one of the rarest burls and only available through environmentally controlled services. :blink:

chris

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Thanks, Chris, I'm wiser but no wiser, if you see what I mean!

 

I've just realised we've shot right round the back of the discussion, through saints, beer, cars, racing colours, and come out at squeezeboxes again.

Edited by Dirge
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...not forgetting the octagonal shape of the MG badge ... .

There y'go...another link to concertinas ! :rolleyes:

 

Talking of MGs, they were built in Abingdon, from the 1920s under the management of one Cecil Kimber. It will not have been lost amongst many on here, that the name Kimber has long been associated with the concertina http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Kimber ....and yet another link back to concertinas !

 

BTW - does anyone know what has happened to Kimber's concertina following the death of Father Ken Loveless?

Edited by wolosp
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BTW - does anyone know what has happened to Kimber's concertina following the death of Father Ken Loveless?

 

I understand that it "held in trust" by the Headington Quarry Morris Men. Unfortunately their current musician plays a PA :o

So unfortunately I don't think it gets played regularly :angry:

That was the position up to a couple of years ago.

Edited by Peter Brook
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Thanks, Chris, I'm wiser but no wiser, if you see what I mean!

 

I've just realised we've shot right round the back of the discussion, through saints, beer, cars, racing colours, and come out at squeezeboxes again.

All things are connected to the Concertina,

but only the wise know how :)

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I understand that it "held in trust" by the Headington Quarry Morris Men. Unfortunately their current musician plays a PA :o

So unfortunately I don't think it gets played regularly :angry:

That was the position up to a couple of years ago.

At least it's better that what I had understood the plans were whilst Father Ken was a live - that he was going to pass it to the EFDSS to display at C# House! :angry:

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At least it's better that what I had understood the plans were whilst Father Ken was a live - that he was going to pass it to the EFDSS to display at C# House! :angry:

It thereby avoided the fate of William Kimber's original concertina. B)

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