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List Of Things Not To Do With Your Concertinas


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Sitting and practicing, then placing concertina on your knee, held by one hand, while the othe ris checking music books, or making notes.

When (it's not a question of 'if') your note will slip and you'll want to adjust it reflectory, your other arm will leave the concertina unattended on your knee.

Here we'll have a case of inevitability vs. hope.

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Play in F or D on a C/G anglo. (People growl at me and stop playing if I do it in a certain local session)

Well, Geoff, I know that it's a long trek down to my session, but tunes in those keys would be most welcome. Mind you, I'd want you sitting opposite me, just so that I could watch where your fingers were going! I'd then have to make the mental adjustment between your Jeffries and my Wheatstone keyboard layouts. :blink:

 

Keep upsetting the locals! :D

 

Regards,

Peter.

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Play in F or D on a C/G anglo. (People growl at me and stop playing if I do it in a certain local session)

 

I get grumbles if I play in C on a C/G Anglo :) - usually from fiddlers who are mentally locked into G, D and A and forget that they can play in other keys.

 

Playing in C on a D/G melodeon is a good way to annoy the other melodeon players...

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Don't let your mother (or anyone else) put your (English) concertina back in one of those old-fashioned cases - the ones that stand up on end - in case they place it in upsidedown. Then the thumbstrap screw isn't aligned with the groove in the box, so as it slides down it can rub on the case sides gradually untwisting as it goes, eventually pushing out and locking the concertina permanently in the box. At this point you'll have a choice between taking an axe to either the case or the concertina (or your dearest ancestor) if you wish to remove it.

 

Then... a few months later perhaps you might repair the case and fit a nice little padlock to the lid to secure it - the key being attached by a little bit of wire for convenience. If so, beware of small brothers who think it would be amusing to place the key inside the case before locking it.... else the axe will get some more use!

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Don't let your mother (or anyone else) put your (English) concertina back in one of those old-fashioned cases - the ones that stand up on end - in case they place it in upsidedown. Then the thumbstrap screw isn't aligned with the groove in the box, so as it slides down it can rub on the case sides gradually untwisting as it goes, eventually pushing out and locking the concertina permanently in the box. At this point you'll have a choice between taking an axe to either the case or the concertina (or your dearest ancestor) if you wish to remove it.

 

Then... a few months later perhaps you might repair the case and fit a nice little padlock to the lid to secure it - the key being attached by a little bit of wire for convenience. If so, beware of small brothers who think it would be amusing to place the key inside the case before locking it.... else the axe will get some more use!

Hi Danny,

 

I always wondered why you moved to Germany! :D

 

Happy New Year!

 

Regards,

Peter.

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All

 

I was wondering what might be an example of things not-to-do with your concertina. such as:

 

"Balance a cup of tea wih milk and sugar on the bellows, so as to avoid spilling onto your new jacket"

 

:blink:

Playing "Meditation" by Massenet next to a cat? (I'm still healing). :blink:

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I was wondering what might be an example of things not-to-do with your concertina.

 

This made me recall a document that was drawn-up and distributed by somebody within the company I work for, complete with a list of revision dates etc, which gave very precise instructions on the handling of cardboard packaging.

 

1. Purpose. This document is a guide for the handling, use and storage of boxes used for packaging for shipment.

 

2. Scope. Any person who handles "pizza-style” boxes on a regular basis.

 

3. Definitions..etc,. etc,.

 

6. Procedure.

 

6.6 General Handling

• Do not throw a box.

• Do not drop a box.

• Do not kick a box.

• Do not place a heavy object on the top, center, of a box.

• Do not utilize a box as a step, crowbar, hammer or door stop. :blink:

 

:wacko:

Edited by wolosp
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