Jump to content

Tune For Burns Night


Gary
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello, and a Happy New Year to one and all.

 

I was wondering if anyone knows of a simple tune that a beginner can play on Burns Night.

 

I have the honour of reciting the Toast to the Haggis, so if I'm up for it after that I may play a tune for the first time in public.

 

I look forward to your help in this matter

 

Thanks.

 

Gary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello, and a Happy New Year to one and all.

 

I was wondering if anyone knows of a simple tune that a beginner can play on Burns Night.

 

I have the honour of reciting the Toast to the Haggis, so if I'm up for it after that I may play a tune for the first time in public.

 

I look forward to your help in this matter

 

Thanks.

 

Gary.

 

Gary, please let us know which system you play as it would affect any recommendations about "easy" tunes.

All the best

Samantha

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello, and a Happy New Year to one and all.
Happy New Year!
I was wondering if anyone knows of a simple tune that a beginner can play on Burns Night.
I can't really help you, but just thought I'd wish aloud that we in the US made holidays of our poets' birthdays!

 

I don't know who would be a good candidate to celebrate, though... Certainly no American poet of Burns' era is as well known as he. Emily Dickinson? Walt Whitman? Robert Frost? Carl Sandburg? E. E. Cummings? Jack Kerouac?

 

I did play "Auld Lang Syne" outside at midnight Monday...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello, sorry.

 

I have an english concertina, and I have been playing for about 4 or 5 weeks now, but I put in the practice.

 

So if you can suggest something simple that would be great.

 

On a kind of related subject, I was speaking to a friend the other day who wants to learn a new instrument and we discussed the merits of playing with other musicians, we talked about how many local musicians we knew and the very high standard of playing.( I live on Skye ), and it struck me that everyone has to start somewhere and the internet and forums like this give the learner a chance to discuss their problems and hurdles without meeting any kind of negativity.

 

We then decided we should take this positive attitude a step further and form a local learners club.

Where it's kind of stressed that only learners can participate, I suppose there would have to be a core of at least one really good musician involved probably one with great patience.

 

I was wondering if anyone else is involved in something similar, and could offer guidance.

 

Kind regards

 

Gary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where it's kind of stressed that only learners can participate, I suppose there would have to be a core of at least one really good musician involved probably one with great patience.

 

I was wondering if anyone else is involved in something similar, and could offer guidance.

 

Kind regards

 

Gary.

 

So you're talking about a music school, club or session?

A "learner" is very wide term, involving everybody.

My former piano accoridon teacher, after completion of concervatory course for Piano Accordion, was teaching himself jazz. He was so much into it and it was so difficult, he was totally burned out.

Peter Soave, an acclaimed CBA player, took up bandoneon. Clearly a learner, but hardly a novice.

How about hiring local musician to teach you the basics (and above) of theory, while you'll be learning the fingering patterns and "bellowing" on your own? If you get another "learner", and split the costs, you can actually pay the teacher well and it'll be a good incentive for any professional to risk the unusual venue. Say, an hour session twice a week, at $100 an hour, provided that the teacher will not be too punctual with cutting off exactly on time, not too talky, not trying to teach you the wold's culture or develop your imagination. Just practical hands on lessons.

Plus, during your regular (!) recitals you'll have a chance to play duets with your teacher.

I'm thinking about all the teachers I know, and suspect they would decline.

They know how to teach their instrument, and the process combines some theory, some practical skills, sound extortion, correct posture...

To offer them just teaching harmony, arranging pieces, finding music, assigning homework and suggesting the phrazing - is too much for ordinary person. Unless the money is way too good to lose the chance. But then again, you don't want somebody too eager to make a buck.

Correspondence course?

Say, some on this forum will teach you the way Gary Dahl teaches his PA harmony application course:

You'll record a lesson and send a tape. Your teacher reviews the tape, points at your mistakes, makes suggestions, plays a few pieces or phrazes, gives you an assignment and sends the tape back to you. Etc.

He may charge you per time spent reviewing your tape. Once every 10 days you'll send another tape. It's economical, effective and convinient.

Anybody on this forum agree to teach this way?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was wondering if anyone knows of a simple tune that a beginner can play on Burns Night.

 

I'll throw my 2p in for 'Maggie Lauder'. I think That would be a great song to play on your tina, mind you that you have had a few pints and belt out the words in your best scottish accent.

 

I myself have not attempted it on the tina - Yet whenever I think of Robert Burns I think of Maggie Lauder even though it was actaully penned by Francis Sempill, but on "Burn's Night" your likely to slip it through.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe Burns wrote this poem but i do not know who set it to music.

 

 

T:A man's a man for a' that

O:Scotland

M:2/4

L:1/8

K:EMix

F|\

A>B AE | FA Bd | c>B AE | F2FE |\

A>B AE | FA Bd | c>B AF | E2E ||

d |\

c>d ec | dc Bd | c>d eA | F2 Fd | \

c>d ec | fB Bd | c>B AF | E2 E ||

 

 

- John Wild

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe Burns wrote this poem but i do not know who set it to music.

Burns wrote this and many other songs to traditional tunes.

In fact, he often wrote a song simply to keep a tune alive, e.g. the tune My Love is but a Lassie yet existed before the song.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe Burns wrote this poem but i do not know who set it to music.

Burns wrote this and many other songs to traditional tunes.

In fact, he often wrote a song simply to keep a tune alive, e.g. the tune My Love is but a Lassie yet existed before the song.

 

I should have remembered that. He was not alone in that practice.

 

- John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...