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Dunse Ding


stevejay
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What a title, no idea what it refers to, and lazy to research it right now...

 

Anyway I saw it is in A Mixolydian, and the G# reach on the right hand is interestring. Is A mixo the key we would generally perform it on a c/g concertina or would you transpose? It certainly has a different feel to it

 

Also I saw 2 versions, the one I'm going after I heard on a Toucan Pirates CD, both were A Mixo however..

 

Thanks

 

Steve

Edited by stevejay
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I don't know anything about the tune, but A mixolydian is the scale that goes from A to A with two sharps, in other words like A major but with a G natural. The most commonly known tune in A mixolydian is probably Red-Haired Boy.

 

Absolutely,, of course it's not A mixo if it has the G#. I "mixed" it up. ugh

 

Rather than this particular tune, do you like to play in A major? It is not totally unpleasant to [lay, just a bit awkwards at times, what do you think.

 

http://cdbaby.com/cd/toucanpirates3

 

you can hear Dunse Dingle at the above link if you want. Its a cool song with a terrible name imo.

Edited by stevejay
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What a title, no idea what it refers to, and lazy to research it right now...

 

Anyway I saw it is in A Mixolydian, and the G# reach on the right hand is interestring. Is A mixo the key we would generally perform it on a c/g concertina or would you transpose? It certainly has a different feel to it

 

Also I saw 2 versions, the one I'm going after I heard on a Toucan Pirates CD, both were A Mixo however..

 

Thanks

 

Steve

Steve

Could it be the same tune as number 63 on this page:

http://www.tartantown.com/images/music_on_...ction_index.pdf

 

I believe Dunse is a town in Scotland:

http://www.nls.uk/digitallibrary/map/early/towns.cfm?id=338

 

thesession.org has it in abc format with G Natural

Thanks

Leo

Edited by Leo
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Steve

Could it be the same tune as number 63 on this page:

http://www.tartantown.com/images/music_on_...ction_index.pdf

 

I believe Dunse is a town in Scotland:

http://www.nls.uk/digitallibrary/map/early/towns.cfm?id=338

 

thesession.org has it in abc format with G Natural

Thanks

Leo

 

Thanks Leo for all this information

 

I like playing in other Keys, and I think I like this particular tune because it slips in and out of a major and minor tonality. Many tunes sound good in both modes, and its fun to combine. Thanks for answering my question

 

 

 

Steve

Edited by stevejay
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An explanation of the tune's title can be found in the fourth entry here.

I agree with the explanation.

I'm familiar with the town of Duns.

There's a memorial to Duns Scotus, the original dunce, outside Duns Castle.

 

In terms of mode, the usual term for such tunes in Scotland is double-tonic,

i.e. alternating between the keys of A and G.

The first half of each part is in A, and the secord half in G.

While still in A, as in bar 2, the G is still sharp, but when the key moves to G, the Gs are then natural.

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An explanation of the tune's title can be found in the fourth entry here.

I agree with the explanation.

I'm familiar with the town of Duns.

There's a memorial to Duns Scotus, the original dunce, outside Duns Castle.

 

In terms of mode, the usual term for such tunes in Scotland is double-tonic,

i.e. alternating between the keys of A and G.

The first half of each part is in A, and the secord half in G.

While still in A, as in bar 2, the G is still sharp, but when the key moves to G, the Gs are then natural.

 

Awesome, a term for what I was hearing. What are some other memorable "double tonic" tunes to play?

The shift reminds me of some Grateful Dead tunes for some reason, fun to improvise off of.

Thanks

 

Steve

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Awesome, a term for what I was hearing. What are some other memorable "double tonic" tunes to play?

There's lots of such tunes - it was a common device in Scottish tunes.

 

Here's a few tune titles to start with.

 

Tullochgorum.

Reel of Tulloch.

Balmoral Highlanders.

The Atholl Highlanders farewell to Loch Katrine.

Arthur Bignold of Loch Rosque.

I'll have a browse through my collection of tune books over the weekend and see how many more similar tunes I can come up with.

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Awesome, a term for what I was hearing. What are some other memorable "double tonic" tunes to play?

There's lots of such tunes - it was a common device in Scottish tunes.

 

Here's a few tune titles to start with.

 

Tullochgorum.

Reel of Tulloch.

Balmoral Highlanders.

The Atholl Highlanders farewell to Loch Katrine.

Arthur Bignold of Loch Rosque.

I'll have a browse through my collection of tune books over the weekend and see how many more similar tunes I can come up with.

 

Why thanks David for the list-

 

I'll listen to the midis and find the notes to some of some of these and see what I can make of them. Midis just take the heart right out of them , but it's better than nothing. Why don't you just recommend ones you play or like?

 

Steve

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So does this count as a double tonic tune? If so, it's one of my favorites.

 

It's in A dorian and G major. Since it has no F naturals or F sharps anywhere in it, you could also say it's in A minor/G mixolydian.

 

[Edited to swap some modes around.]

Edited by David Barnert
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Also I saw 2 versions, the one I'm going after I heard on a Toucan Pirates CD, both were A Mixo however..

 

Thanks

 

Steve

Steve

 

FWIW: A search in JC's ABC tune finder gives this result

 

Have fun

 

 

 

Completely off topic:

 

Henk, whats that box in your member picture?

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