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Switching Octaves


stevejay

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On a tune such as "Nine Points Of Roguery" in D, on a 30 button c/g anglo, I play the A part an octave up then switch octaves for the B part where the fingering gets more reasonable. It also allows some chords and a fluid sound on the A.

 

Those triplets performed on the left side seem near impossible to get smooth, but on the right hand. they fall into place nicely. If you know the tune, this will make sense.

 

You can continue the B part in the higher octave, and it will creep up to notes that only dogs can hear. I'm not fond of playing up there very long.

 

Do you suffer with awkward positions, or just switch octaves when you don't feel like struggling with the note sequence. I'll bet most do, but since I am a lone concertina wolf, I ask these questions. Switching octaves seems like a very "concertinaistic" approach to solving layout peculiarities.

 

 

 

Steve

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Do you suffer with awkward positions, or just switch octaves when you don't feel like struggling with the note sequence. I'll bet most do, but since I am a lone concertina wolf, I ask these questions. Switching octaves seems like a very "concertinaistic" approach to solving layout peculiarities.

Hi Steve,

 

I generally switch, but on some tunes, either octave seems to work. This leaves me a bit confused until I decide which approach I am going to adopt (happens on session tunes which I don't often play). To an extent, "nice chords" might dictate choice.

 

Regards,

Peter.

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Do you suffer with awkward positions, or just switch octaves when you don't feel like struggling with the note sequence. I'll bet most do, but since I am a lone concertina wolf, I ask these questions. Switching octaves seems like a very "concertinaistic" approach to solving layout peculiarities.

Peter.

 

I do so almost as a matter of course in many tunes as I play a lot in octaves and with heavy lefthand chords. Very often these changes are almost unconsciously made. As you say, it is sometimes necessary too, just to avoid running out of notes in the upper or lower extremes of a tune.

I deliberately make octave changes quite a lot in sessions or with the band as I find this can add depth and colour to the overall sound mix.

 

On occasion when playing for dancing I also find that a changing the key of a tune mid-dance up from say, G to D, seems to add a certain 'urgency' to the music and can help liven up 'flagging' dancers towards the end of a set.

 

Regards

 

Dave

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