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And You Thought Jeffries Were Too Expensive!


Paul Read

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A 1950s Wheatstone just went on Ebay for GBP3600!!!!!!!!!! - about the same as last week's Linota. Possibly they thought it was in the same class? This was a D/A (two semitones higher than a C/G - a bit squeaky I'd have thought). It went to Ireland.

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...A:IT&ih=010

Edited by Paul Read
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A 1950s Wheatstone just went on Ebay for GBP3600!!!!!!!!!! - about the same as last week's Linota. Possibly they thought it was in the same class? This was a D/A (two semitones higher than a C/G - a bit squeaky I'd have thought). It went to Ireland.

Paul,

 

Though I see that none of the bidders had much feedback, and the winning bidder had none. Either they badly wanted one in such a rare key, or they "got carried away" bidding. I wonder if the deal will go through, or what feedback Vic will be leaving? :unsure:

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The 10 fold bellows are a strong indication of an S.A. origin. Apparently they love their chords.

The buyer in Ireland may literally have his hands full if he wants to play reels.

 

I should add that my first C/G was a S. A. 8 fold 50s Wheatstone via the Button Box. It was quite a decent instrument and the 8 folds (I believe they were not factory original) were well done, even if never fully extended while in my care.

 

I seem to remember Vic and the Button Box having 40b C/Gs for sale. This is, to my recollection, the first 36b Wheatstone from the 50s that I have seen the past 3 years. I liked the radial pan and traditional dovetailing of the ebay D/A. The price seemed a bit dear but the key is rare. I hope the buyer is happy; I'm sure Vic will be when he gets payment.

 

Greg

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Vic seems to turn up a lot of instruments from this era. Do you think they are South African ones?

I understand that the same old-imperial trading company, called "Goode, Durrant & Murray", exported them to both South Africa and Australia. They seem to have been Wheatstone's chief customers for Anglos after WWII.

 

... my first C/G was a S. A. 8 fold 50s Wheatstone via the Button Box. It was quite a decent instrument and the 8 folds (I believe they were not factory original) were well done ...

Though the factory sometimes did fit 8-fold, as shown in the ledgers for #56459-70 (31-1-54) described as NP octo (8 Fold), and probably others too.

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The 10 fold bellows are a strong indication of an S.A. origin. Apparently they love their chords.

The buyer in Ireland may literally have his hands full if he wants to play reels.

 

I should add that my first C/G was a S. A. 8 fold 50s Wheatstone via the Button Box. It was quite a decent instrument and the 8 folds (I believe they were not factory original) were well done, even if never fully extended while in my care.

 

I seem to remember Vic and the Button Box having 40b C/Gs for sale. This is, to my recollection, the first 36b Wheatstone from the 50s that I have seen the past 3 years. I liked the radial pan and traditional dovetailing of the ebay D/A. The price seemed a bit dear but the key is rare. I hope the buyer is happy; I'm sure Vic will be when he gets payment.

 

Greg

 

 

I spoke with a very friendly canadian player who was bidding on that instrument and he told me this

 

'With regards to the Wheatstone...36 buttons... I believe the seller is VIC909. His real name is Vic Tromp from Australia (ex-South African). He sells South African Wheatstones.

 

The repairman he writes about is Willie Van Wyk...a concertina builder/repairman outside of Pretoria. Mr. Van Wyk makes excellent 40 button Aeola concertinas.'

 

I hope that helps!

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The repairman he writes about is Willie Van Wyk...a concertina builder/repairman outside of Pretoria. Mr. Van Wyk makes excellent 40 button Aeola concertinas.'

 

Just to set the record straight here, it was me who did the recent tune/re-valve/service for Vic referred to in the eBay description.

 

I believe the bellows were made by Mr Van Wyk some years back, very nicely done despite their length; takes a bit of getting used to, but plays well as long as you don't extend them more than about half way. :o

 

 

I shall refrain from making any further comments until the matter is finalised, in fairness to both seller and buyer, but must remark that it was about the best "late" Wheatstone I have played, notwithstanding the bellows length.

 

MC

Edited by malcolm clapp
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I understand that the same old-imperial trading company, called "Goode, Durrant & Murray", exported them to both South Africa and Australia. They seem to have been Wheatstone's chief customers for Anglos after WWII.

 

 

A little surprised at this, Stephen. I have seen very few late Wheatstones in Australia other than those with a South African connection or purchased in recent years from UK dealers or eBay. In fact, I can't think of any!

 

Now, if we could get hold of their (G D & M) sales ledgers....

 

MC

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I understand that the same old-imperial trading company, called "Goode, Durrant & Murray", exported them to both South Africa and Australia. They seem to have been Wheatstone's chief customers for Anglos after WWII.

 

 

A little surprised at this, Stephen. I have seen very few late Wheatstones in Australia other than those with a South African connection or purchased in recent years from UK dealers or eBay. In fact, I can't think of any!

 

Now, if we could get hold of their (G D & M) sales ledgers....

 

MC

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I understand that the same old-imperial trading company, called "Goode, Durrant & Murray", exported them to both South Africa and Australia. They seem to have been Wheatstone's chief customers for Anglos after WWII.
I have seen very few late Wheatstones in Australia other than those with a South African connection or purchased in recent years from UK dealers or eBay. In fact, I can't think of any!

 

Now, if we could get hold of their (G D & M) sales ledgers....

Malcolm,

 

OK, let me rephrase that then:

 

The old-imperial trading company "Goode, Durrant & Murray" seems to have been Wheatstone's chief customer for Anglos after WWII. They exported both to South Africa and Australia.

So do you think there was no interest in new Anglos in Australia in the late 1940s or the 1950s?

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I understand that the same old-imperial trading company, called "Goode, Durrant & Murray", exported them to both South Africa and Australia. They seem to have been Wheatstone's chief customers for Anglos after WWII.
I have seen very few late Wheatstones in Australia other than those with a South African connection or purchased in recent years from UK dealers or eBay. In fact, I can't think of any!

 

Now, if we could get hold of their (G D & M) sales ledgers....

Malcolm,

 

OK, let me rephrase that then:

 

The old-imperial trading company "Goode, Durrant & Murray" seems to have been Wheatstone's chief customer for Anglos after WWII. They exported both to South Africa and Australia.

So do you think there was no interest in new Anglos in Australia in the late 1940s or the 1950s?

 

 

Who can say? And yes, I should clarify my earlier comment in that I was referring to anglos.

 

I have run across quite a few "late" English and duet Wheatstones and Crabbs, but not late anglos. Perhaps there were sufficient of them here already by that time....

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The repairman he writes about is Willie Van Wyk...a concertina builder/repairman outside of Pretoria. Mr. Van Wyk makes excellent 40 button Aeola concertinas.'

 

Just to set the record straight here, it was me who did the recent tune/re-valve/service for Vic referred to in the eBay description.

 

I believe the bellows were made by Mr Van Wyk some years back, very nicely done despite their length; takes a bit of getting used to, but plays well as long as you don't extend them more than about half way. :o

 

MC

 

Hello Malcolm, I must plead ignorance and apologise for misinformation!

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I understand that the same old-imperial trading company, called "Goode, Durrant & Murray", exported them to both South Africa and Australia. They seem to have been Wheatstone's chief customers for Anglos after WWII.
I have seen very few late Wheatstones in Australia other than those with a South African connection or purchased in recent years from UK dealers or eBay. In fact, I can't think of any!

 

Now, if we could get hold of their (G D & M) sales ledgers....

Malcolm,

 

OK, let me rephrase that then:

 

The old-imperial trading company "Goode, Durrant & Murray" seems to have been Wheatstone's chief customer for Anglos after WWII. They exported both to South Africa and Australia.

So do you think there was no interest in new Anglos in Australia in the late 1940s or the 1950s?

 

 

Who can say? And yes, I should clarify my earlier comment in that I was referring to anglos.

 

I have run across quite a few "late" English and duet Wheatstones and Crabbs, but not late anglos. Perhaps there were sufficient of them here already by that time....

 

Having now done a little googling of Goode, Durrant & Murray, it would appear that their interests in Australia were concentrated on the states of Western Australia and South Australia, which is *possibly* why, if they did indeed import Wheatstone anglos to Australia, we never see them in the eastern states, a few thousand miles down the track....

 

Oh, the tyrrany of distance.... ;)

 

MC

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