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Don't I also recall anecdotes regarding an ICA member who played bandonion? Could it be that, rather than an accordion? :unsure:

You mean Pat Robson? On stylistic grounds I would be very surprised if it were him. We are talking a man who made a box of sound effects he could work with his feet while he played. Pat's style was pretty broad. Definitely not him, but still sadly missed.

 

Chris

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The recording track list is as follows (so I am told)

1)Manhatten Beach March

2)Impudence Schottische

3)Bluebell Polka

4)Colenal Bogey March

5) not sure may be Lintspiel

6)On the Quarterdeck

7)Petite Waltz

8)Jeanette Musette

9) Folk tune Medley

10)Under Freedom's Flag

11)Belgrave(ia) March

12)Unknown

13)Unknown

14)Minuet from Bernice

15)The Veleta

 

Al

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The recording track list is as follows (so I am told)

1)Manhatten Beach March

2)Impudence Schottische

3)Bluebell Polka

4)Colenal Bogey March

5) not sure may be Lintspiel

6)On the Quarterdeck

7)Petite Waltz

8)Jeanette Musette

9) Folk tune Medley

10)Under Freedom's Flag

11)Belgrave(ia) March

12)Unknown

13)Unknown

14)Minuet from Bernice

15)The Veleta

Al,

 

Sounds like you know something you're not telling us? :unsure:

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Slightly off-topic, but how is gigue pronounced? as jig?
At least according to my dictionary, the French gigue probably came from "jig" to begin with.
Clearly, the Chemnitzer keyboard has a lot going for it.
If you're playing a two-chord song in G or A, with oom-pah accompaniment, it sure does. You barely have to move the left hand.
It could be a single-reed bandonion, or even the Wheatstone "bandoneon" you posted about earlier.
Almost certainly not that particular instrument (really a Chemnitzer layout), if the recording is English, since that instrument was found in America.
Maybe the original purchaser traveled to the Wheatstone factory to pick up the instrument and somebody recorded him (or her) before he (or she) returned home. Some of the selections are not uncommon in the Midwest lexicon. One ("Under Freedom's Flag") is even composed by a Pole (Feliks Nowowiejski)... Until Alan reveals the truth, the possibilities for speculation continue to grow!

 

I would like to hear the two selections listed as "Unknown" to have a shot at identifying.

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Do you think we should get Miss Marple and Poirot in on this Woody.

Put the names around a big table and we can all gasp at the verdict.

It just may happen.

Al

Do we know of any players called Butler????? B)

 

- W

To be Frank maybe? :huh:

 

It's always the Butler wot done it :rolleyes:

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With regards to the Bluebell Polka, there is a chap at our folk club who plays precisely in that style on quite a large McCann Duet. The left hand vamping is identical. It's impressive when you see him do it.

Anyone that I know?

 

Regards,

Peter.

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The recording track list is as follows (so I am told)

1)Manhatten Beach March

2)Impudence Schottische

3)Bluebell Polka

4)Colenal Bogey March

5) not sure may be Lintspiel

6)On the Quarterdeck

7)Petite Waltz

8)Jeanette Musette

9) Folk tune Medley

10)Under Freedom's Flag

11)Belgrave(ia) March

12)Unknown

13)Unknown

14)Minuet from Bernice

15)The Veleta

 

Al,

 

Sounds like you know something you're not telling us? :unsure:

 

 

:ph34r: Pedant warning! Pedant warning! :ph34r:

 

5) is the Lustspiel Overture by Kela Beler (without funny Hungarian accents not supported by Alt codes afaict; got me in big trouble on Mudcat last week!)

 

Certainly looks like an international selection, so it must be an International Concertina Association connection....? :D :rolleyes:

 

And my brass band "expert" says 11) is definitely Belgrave, rather than Belgravia. Where's Belgrave? The only one I know is near Melbourne! Belgravia is in London, isn't it? Maybe it should be Belgrade, to add a further international touch....

 

MC (ASCII and geographically challenged!))

Edited by malcolm clapp
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It's over half an hour since the last post to this topic....

Have we run out of ideas??? :D

 

MC

 

After lengthy investigation I've made some progress. I can say with reasonable certainty that it's not me - I think :unsure:

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With regards to the Bluebell Polka, there is a chap at our folk club who plays precisely in that style on quite a large McCann Duet. The left hand vamping is identical. It's impressive when you see him do it.

Anyone that I know?

 

Regards,

Peter.

 

I don't know. Do you know a Martin somebody who plays McCann, Northumbrian Smallpipes, Bowlback Mandolin and various early music instruments who also goes to folk clubs in Leicestershire (and I think to quite a few Breton music meets as well)?

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I happened to buy the one which Marcus had, at Chippenham. Couldn't really afford it (he's been very good regarding payment), but thought that I couldn't pass up the opportunity.

Regards,

Peter.

Welcome to the 'club' Peter! :)

 

I had a play on that 'tina at Marcus' stall Peter - a very nice instrument (I was actually looking for a new case to replace my original leather one, but all those on sale were too small).

 

BTW - ref this thread.....IMO it's two players! :P

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Hi all,

With my old equipment I never seemed able to download recordings successfully. For that reason I could not respond to topics that contained tune links but with a super new PC everything now seems to work.

 

Having listened to the ‘Bluebell Polka’ link and a copy of the CD from Alan, I can say that I am 99.9% sure that the performer is my father, Henry Joseph (Harry) Crabb.

 

Although he was best known as a maker of concertinas, Dad was for many years an accomplished player and musician, having been ‘put to’ the concertina at the age of 8 years and studying music with the composer and arranger Sydney Baynes*.

 

Although not a ‘professional’, he did make occasional public performances to supplement his income until the age of 19 when he had to take over the family business.

 

The BBPolka recording was made probably around 1955/6, I suspect, at an ICA social event before recurring ill health and the later burden associated with the concertina revival affected his performing abilities.

 

The instrument used in this rendition was a 59 Key Crane Duet, which he purpose built to suit his own requirements circa 1950. This incorporated auxiliary low notes to suit his repertoire of opera overtures, Sousa marches and light popular music of the day. This instrument is now in the custody of Kurt Brauhn.

 

*Sydney Baynes 1879-1938. Composer and arranger for piano and violin.

Probably best known work, 'Destiny Waltz'.

 

 

 

 

Geoff Crabb

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Don't know whether to be pleased to have the mystery resolved or sad that such an entertaining discussion has ended, but it's certainly a pretty piece of concertina-work.

Yes, mixed feeling from me, too.

 

Let's look on the bright side, perhaps Alan will soon receive another recording which he needs us to identify. :)

 

Regards,

Peter.

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I assume you are referring to the late Pat Robson.

However I don't think he was an ICA member until a little after these recordings were made.

 

(ICA Membership Sec/former Membership Sec, can you confirm this?)

 

MC

 

I was ICA Treasurer/membership secretary 1989 to 2005.

 

I only starting logging the year of joining as a permanent field in the database from 1991.

While some dates were known for some members before that, most who were members in 1991 could only be listed as members with the tag 'joined pre-1991. In Pat Robson's case from personal knowledge, I can say he was a member by the time I joined in 1984.

 

Regards

 

John Wild

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