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Battle Of The Somme


PeterT
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Anne and I played it on Saturday morning, sitting on the campsite at the West Somerset folk festival, once we were confident that most people were awake!

 

On the state of the nation's health at that time, it is a telling fact that the height requirement for entry to the Army had to be relaxed at least twice, as men from the northern mill towns had had such an inadequate diet during their adolecence.

 

If you ever get the chance to see the play "The Accrington Pals" it gives a pretty accurate account of the times.

After the use of certain regiments as cannon fodder when World War 2 there were some towns in the north where not a single volunteer vame forward.

 

Robin Madge

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Hi Paul,

Assuming that you play it on the duet, do you play it in the key of C?

Regards,

Peter.

Hi Peter,

Actually, I play it in G on my Duet, but play it in C on my Accordion! :wacko:

I taught myself the Jeffries in G (not the easiest key apparently) because of my morris background, but I'm currently trying to extend the keys I play in.

Rgds,

Paul

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Does anyone play the tune "Battle of the Somme", which was, as far as I am aware, written during the battle? I've played it for as many years as I can remember, but heard it played both as a slow march, and lament, whilst I lived in Scotland (1991/4).

I too have known the tune for a long time.

 

Last week, I started playing the tune again, and to make up a set I preceded it with another pipe retreat march from that time, The Bloody Fields of Flanders.

 

I like the change in rhythm going from 3/4 to 9/8.

 

I do the same with another set of 3/4 marches I play, ending up with the change to 9/8 for the Heights of Dargai.

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David, do you have the dots or a sound file for The Bloody Fields of Flanders?

 

I've just learned to play The Battle of The Somme on my duet, also in G (as I have already been playing it on the guitar in that key) and I'd quite like to link it with another tune.

 

Cheers,

T.

 

PS: Incidentally, I'm off to re-enact another famous battle this weekend: http://www.tewkesburymedievalfestival.org/battle.htm

Edited by Cream-T
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........... do you have the dots or a sound file for The Bloody Fields of Flanders?...........

 

Cheers,

T.

 

PS: Incidentally, I'm off to re-enact another famous battle this weekend: http://www.tewkesburymedievalfestival.org/battle.htm

 

 

I believe it is written for bagpipes. Am looking up random tunes as practice in case I ever have to do it for real.

 

Thanks

Leo

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That's it.

NB Although this version shows the key as D, it's normally played in the key of A.

It all depends on whether you want to play G natural, as the bagpipes have to do, or G sharp.

I tend to make a decision based on how the tune sounds, and if it sounds definately in the key of A, like this tune, I play the Gs as G sharp.

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[
NB Although this version shows the key as D, it's normally played in the key of A.

In spite of the 2 sharps, it's not in D, but in A-mixolydian. The central pitch is still A.

 

It all depends on whether you want to play G natural, as the bagpipes have to do, or G sharp.

I tend to make a decision based on how the tune sounds, and if it sounds definately in the key of A, like this tune, I play the Gs as G sharp.

Does this tune have another name? I know I've heard it before, a number of times, but the name isn't familiar. And I've definitely heard it as a fiddle tune, with G#'s. Do you know whether it was originally composed for the pipes, or whether the G-naturals are a change from the original to fit it to the pipes?

 

Regardless of whichever way is the "original", I have to admit that I prefer it with the G#'s. :)

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Does this tune have another name? I know I've heard it before, a number of times, but the name isn't familiar.

 

Regardless of whichever way is the "original", I have to admit that I prefer it with the G#'s. :)

 

BLOODY FIELDS OF FLANDERS, THE. A Great Highland pipe tune dating to World War I. It is the vehicle for Hamish Henderson’s famous song “Freedom Come All Ye.” From "Fiddler's companion file list". Can't speak with authority, just looking up stuff, and repeating it.

 

 

Thanks

Leo

Edited by Paul Schwartz
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BLOODY FIELDS OF FLANDERS, THE. A Great Highland pipe tune dating to World War I. It is the vehicle for Hamish Henderson’s famous song “Freedom Come All Ye.”

Of course! That's where I know it from! :)

 

Thanks.

Reminds me that I should learn the words.

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Of course! That's where I know it from! :)

 

Very Welcome, glad it's the one and not a renamed tune, or a retuned name. It's tough being new, learning curve and all. So far so good, now if i can only eliminate the mistakes.......

 

Thanks

Leo

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