Jump to content

New Member


Recommended Posts

Hello Everyone,

 

I became a Member today after having "mined" the Forum for several days, looking for helpful information and concertina recommendations.

 

I will be attending Noel Hill's West Coast School this August (fortunately, I live 45 minutes from the school location) as a beginner. Per Mr. Morse's recommendation in this Forum, I'm trying (unsuccessfully) to locate a 30-button Stagi to rent for the school as I don't want to order a higher-end instrument until after I've had a chance to hear, and hopefully be allowed to play, some different concertinas at Noel's school. Linda Mann at the school has given me good advice on what to do to prepare for the course so I don't develop any bad habits that would need to be "unlearned".

 

What has been most impressive to me as I have looked back through many months of threads is the cordiality and willingness of all of you to help folks new to the concertina, and your patience in answering the same questions common to those of us just starting out (don't worry, I'm not going to ask what concertina I should buy...that has been covered most eloquently in many posts). There is a definite comaraderie here and a genuine desire to welcome newcomers that is most refreshing in this oh, so weary world. And for that, I thank you all very much.

 

If I might be allowed to ask one question, it would be this: If you had known then what you know now, what would you have done differently in learning the concertina?

 

It's a privilege to be your newest member and I hope to have the opportunity to perhaps meet some of you at schools or other gatherings.

 

Thanks again!

 

Cordially,

 

Bob Hawkins

Wilsonville, OR

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Couldn't agree more! I'm glad other people are more eloquent than me. It doesn't take long to recognise the expertise in the opinions. I'm glad they're here. Thanks guys

 

Not quit as new but not that far ahead

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I might be allowed to ask one question, it would be this: If you had known then what you know now, what would you have done differently in learning the concertina?

I would have practiced more diligentlly and pestered -- even paid -- several more people to show me exactly what they were doing. Then practiced some more.

 

Back then I believed that versatility was important in learning what was right for me. Time has only strengthened that belief. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I might be allowed to ask one question, it would be this: If you had known then what you know now, what would you have done differently in learning the concertina?

 

Being born Mícheál Ó Raghallaigh would I think have been a smart move on my part.. alas, I didn't do that...

 

So baring that I would say I would have skipped the Stagi and gone straight to the Marcus that was my first real box.

 

It's a privilege to be your newest member and I hope to have the opportunity to perhaps meet some of you at schools or other gatherings.

 

Welcome aboard. Hope you can make it out one of these years to the Catskills. This year ought to be good as there is certainly enough standouts coming this year...

 

--

Bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome, Bob and Leo.

 

I did several things right, in hindsight:

 

* Bought a mid range instrument to start, then upgraded to an excellent one just a year later (even though my playing didn't justify it).

 

* Used the instrument quality as an incentive to practice, to justify the financial outlay.

 

* Got persuaded to play for a dance team, even though I wasn't quite ready. Improved my playing literally within two or three weeks, and gave my practice a focus (i.e. practice to perform for the Morris, rather than practice for practice sake).

 

* Listened to other musicians who played music that I liked (recorded some, too) and tried to see whether the tunes would fit comfortably on the concertina.

 

However, what I would have done differently, in hindsight, would have been to look at more diverse types of music rather than just traditional tunes and airs. These provide more of a challenge, even now. I like to play the more standard type of traditional dance tunes in sessions etc., but prefer to practice, and work on, other tunes which I would term "Party Pieces", for performances and the like. This, hopefully, continues to stretch my ability.

 

Regards,

Peter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wecome to the forum Bob & Leo!

Not sure if I would have done anything differently in hindsight - I played the 'tina for Morris for a couple of years (forcing myself to move over from my main squeeze which was the accordion), and more recently have been trying to enlarge my repertoire on my Duet.

I'm also hoping to learn non-folkie tunes in order to develop my playing style.

 

Good luck - and I hope to hear further about your progress!

 

Regards,

 

Paul

Edited by wolosp
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello

 

If you are interested enough to sign up for Noel's school I would reccomend to go ahead , as others say and get a good mid range (accordion reeded) concertina.

 

 

This will get you sometheing that is fast enough and agile so you can have meaningful practise for ornaments and getting them right, and getting slowly and surely up to speed.

 

It really is an economical choice because so many of us flounder around with cheaper instruments on the way to the mid range concertina that you can easily spend a lot more.than if you just bought a good mid range instrument from the start.

 

On a good mid range instrument you can go very far, then perhaps move up to an instrument that has the sound that you want.

 

You might be able to find a good condition used one for a bit less perhaps, or just order one just to your liking.

 

You'll have great opportunities to try very good instruments in Portland.

 

See you there.

 

Richard

Edited by richard
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a really good question. There are not that many things in my life that I regret doing, but an awful lot that I wish I'd done earlier, for instance moving away from London to the West of England. To address the specific question: I wish I'd got a G/D anglo much earlier than I did.

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob, since you are planning to rent an instrument to start with, why not rent a "mid-range" one (i.e. Edgley, Morse, Herrington ...). The comparison between a Stagi and one of those models is that of a toy with the real thing - honestly. The Button Box, I think, rent instruments. If I'm right, Rich Morse will pop up here soon and say so. If not, then somewhere else in the States does ...

Samantha

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I appreciate (as I'm sure my fellow "new-member" Leo does) the words of welcome and advice by the several people who have replied to this post.... PeterT's concept of investing in a very high-end concertina as a practice-motivator was most enlightening.

 

Many of your comments have reinforced my decision to skip purchasing a Stagi and go at once to a quality, intermediate concertina. As Richard pointed out, I hope to have the opportunity to see, listen to and perhaps try out several makes of quality instruments at Noel's school in August, with the intention of ordering one immediately after; hence the idea of finding a Stagi to rent. (I look forward to meeting you there, Richard).

 

Samantha, I wish indeed that I could rent an intermediate concertina to use during Noel's school, but I have checked around and none are available. The nice folks at Button Box regretted that they didn't even have a Stagi to rent.

 

But my observation that the people of this Forum are a unique crowd indeed has been proven by the fact that a Member has graciously offered to let me use his Stagi in preparation for, during and after the School, to include the time that it takes for me to receive my intermediate concertina. He lives a few hours away from me, and I hope to meet with him to pick up the Stagi in a week or two. What a generous gesture of support to a beginner!

 

Linda at Noel's school has suggested that I "sound out tunes and get used to the in and outness of the instrument" before I arrive so as not to come with a bunch of bad habits.... makes a great deal of sense to me.

 

I also like the advice about exploring different styles of music. Though I'm primarily interested in Irish music, I've really enjoyed some of the Morris concertina tunes I've heard online and will most likely explore that style as I go forward.

 

And thanks, wolosp, for the interest in my progress with the concertina. I would very much like to report on my experience at the school, and I'm sure will have many more questions to bother you all with down the road!

 

Thanks again, everyone.

 

Bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob, since you are planning to rent an instrument to start with, why not rent a "mid-range" one (i.e. Edgley, Morse, Herrington ...). The comparison between a Stagi and one of those models is that of a toy with the real thing - honestly. The Button Box, I think, rent instruments. If I'm right, Rich Morse will pop up here soon and say so. If not, then somewhere else in the States does ...
The Button Box does rent concertinas, but currently we are not renting out our Morse boxes. Our idea behind renting Stagis is to enable folks to decide if concertina is for them and what system works best for them. Our typical customer will try out one out (or two or all 3 types of concertinas - sequentially) for a few months to see if things grok - if not, they're out or it for less than a Chinese box costs (with associated problems). If they take to concertinas - they can put half their rental fees toward any instrument we have knowing that they've made a good decision with minimal outlay and troubles.

 

While it may be great renting one of our Morse boxes, we'd have to charge appreciatively more for the service - probably more than people are willing to pay. Certainly anyone is welcome to try out boxes out - but such is more for quality concerns (response, sound character, esthetics, size/weight, etc.) rather than for learning to play purposes.

 

We could be convinced otherwise.... :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...