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Latest Ebay Jeffries


Daniel Hersh
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I'm sure Chris Algar will make his usual last minute snipe and it will eventually become at worst a Phoenix and at best a good Jeffries.

 

He tried, but that was followed by a last second snipe.

 

Instrument sold for USD 5,350.00 !!!!!

And just like that... another one appears, in somewhat better shape..

Which would be this one. Has anyone tried to get a look at it? How about a guess as to the final price? It looks very much like my own Anglo, except mine has no nameplate and is therefore "worth" considerably less.

 

Daniel

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I wouldn't like to guess at a final price. There are some very silly people out there right now. But I have to say it is the very model of a good eBay listing. "limes52" should be commended for outlining exactly the areas of uncertainty, though it is a shame he/she wasn't able to get a player to check the key first.

 

Chris

 

Edited to add PS: notice that although the vendor is English the bidding is in dollars.

Edited by Chris Timson
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Ebay offers you dollars as default currency; if you are too dopey to tick the box for pounds (you only need to do it the first time you list) you get dollars in your listing. I think too some of the junk dealers see America as the best market for their tat. (and maybe they are right?) so then $ might make sense. I know I, bidding from England and therefore with an advantage on the postal charges find it infuriating to see UK prices quoted in dollars implying that to buy I pay to convert £ to $ and the seller will then pay AGAIN to convert $ to £. It just brings in complication and uncertainty and loses money to middlemen. If I see the seller volunteering to do money convertions for purchasers I assume he's a robbing sod and hoping to make on the conversion. Thoroughly irritating business (you can probably tell!). I avoid sellers like this, and it probably reinforces their theories that the USA pays the best prices if others do the same!

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I wouldn't like to guess at a final price. There are some very silly people out there right now.

Are you talking about that other Jeffries that just sold? It was Chris Algar's bid of $5250 that pushed the winner up to $5350. The winner's limit may actually have been higher, but the (frightening?) truth is that Chris A. -- arguably the most expert judge of market price -- apparently felt it was worth paying £3000 and then paying to restore it before resale. The next bid below Chris was only $4700, nearly 10% less.

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Ebay offers you dollars as default currency; if you are too dopey to tick the box for pounds (you only need to do it the first time you list) you get dollars in your listing.

I think it depends on "where" you log on. If I go to www.ebay.com, it defaults to dollars. If I go to www.ebay.co.uk, it defaults to pounds.

 

I know I, bidding from England and therefore with an advantage on the postal charges find it infuriating to see UK prices quoted in dollars implying that to buy I pay to convert £ to $ and the seller will then pay AGAIN to convert $ to £.

It's worse than that with PayPal (which is owned by eBay, no?). I have a dollar-denominated account with my Danish bank, but PayPal will not allow me to either pay or receive in dollars, even when the other end is dollars. I.e., if I want to pay with the dollars in my dollar account, PayPal will insist on receiving it as kroner (a conversion I would have to pay my bank to do), then charge me to convert it back to dollars to make the payment. And if I only had kroner, my bank would be glad to convert it and make a payment directly in dollars, but PayPal won't allow that. They insist on being the ones to do the conversion, and their charges are double what my bank charges.

 

And of course, if a Dane is selling something, they can't list a price in dollars, so if I were to win such an auction and pay via PayPal, they would charge for double conversion. Better I should get the seller's bank account number, have my bank transfer a kroner payment based on the published interbank exchange rate, then have the seller tell eBay that payment has been made. Both buyer and seller would have to agree to that, of course, but we could both come out money ahead as a result.

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Guest Peter Laban
It's worse than that with PayPal (which is owned by eBay, no?). I have a dollar-denominated account with my Danish bank, but PayPal will not allow me to either pay or receive in dollars, even when the other end is dollars. I.e., if I want to pay with the dollars in my dollar account, PayPal will insist on receiving it as kroner (a conversion I would have to pay my bank to do), then charge me to convert it back to dollars to make the payment. And if I only had kroner, my bank would be glad to convert it and make a payment directly in dollars, but PayPal won't allow that. They insist on being the ones to do the conversion, and their charges are double what my bank charges.

 

And of course, if a Dane is selling something, they can't list a price in dollars, so if I were to win such an auction and pay via PayPal, they would charge for double conversion. Better I should get the seller's bank account number, have my bank transfer a kroner payment based on the published interbank exchange rate, then have the seller tell eBay that payment has been made. Both buyer and seller would have to agree to that, of course, but we could both come out money ahead as a result.

 

You can change your account settings and receive/make payments in a variety of currencies on paypal. I take euro, $ and sterling payments for 'They'll be good yet' and transfer them into the bankaccount in euro. I don't think Paypal makes an exception for Danish account holders.

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You can change your account settings and receive/make payments in a variety of currencies on paypal. I take euro, $ and sterling payments for 'They'll be good yet' and transfer them into the bankaccount in euro. I don't think Paypal makes an exception for Danish account holders.

But isn't that my point? PayPal converts them to Euro before putting them into your account. Or are you saying that you have three separate accounts connected to PayPal, one for each currency, and your bank does the final conversion?

 

I have corresponded with PayPal, and they told me their rules don't allow that. They won't even put dollars into a US bank account if the address to which the bank statements are sent is outside the US.

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I could have told you paypal wouldn't respond to reason. Must be nice to have your market so stitched up that you don't need to even try and keep your established customers happy. I couldn't even get a CEO name out of them to write to when I lost patience with them. I use them but I don't like them!

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You can change your account settings and receive/make payments in a variety of currencies on paypal. I take euro, $ and sterling payments for 'They'll be good yet' and transfer them into the bankaccount in euro. I don't think Paypal makes an exception for Danish account holders.

But isn't that my point? PayPal converts them to Euro before putting them into your account. Or are you saying that you have three separate accounts connected to PayPal, one for each currency, and your bank does the final conversion?

 

I have corresponded with PayPal, and they told me their rules don't allow that. They won't even put dollars into a US bank account if the address to which the bank statements are sent is outside the US.

 

When I almost got caught in that scam a short while back, no one did well out of the exercise except for Paypal who managed to convert my US$ payment to C$ to be withdrawn from/paid into a US$ visa account where Visa converted it back to US$!

 

Of course, this pays for Paypal as they have a hidden fee in their exchange rate. I still haven't got them to recognise this US$ card as US$.

 

If you can avoid Paypal I recommend you do although sometimes it is impossible to avoid them.

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  • 2 weeks later...
If you can avoid Paypal I recommend you do although sometimes it is impossible to avoid them.

 

A dangerous recommendation. With Paypal you have at least some protection. If you bypass it, you're only too easily ripped off. The only alternatives I accept on some occasions are cash-on-collection and UK personal cheques, but usually I sell through Paypal only.

Edited by Cream-T
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If you can avoid Paypal I recommend you do although sometimes it is impossible to avoid them.

 

A dangerous recommendation. With Paypal you have at least some protection. If you bypass it, you're only too easily ripped off. The only alternatives I accept on some occasions are cash-on-collection and UK personal cheques, but usually I sell through Paypal only.

 

I'm not sure whether, practically, there is real cover with Paypal. Try getting Paypal to address your issues. I've been trying to get them to change their records re my US$ Visa for about two months now with no success.

If you can do it (buying), my experience suggests you're better off using Visa/Mastercard without Paypal. If you're caught by a fraud using Visa, visa will reimburse you.

 

Also, f you're selling via Paypal there is a hefty fee involved. There is also a hefty hidden fee hidden in their currency exchange rates.

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Agreed, relatively speaking...but a lot of money nonetheless, especially with the key unknown. Both bought by the same person, too, I believe. I wonder if he/she is among us on c.net?

 

Daniel

 

"Winning bid: US $5,900.00"

 

Eeeek! :o

 

Compared to the first one that is a steal!

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Agreed, relatively speaking...but a lot of money nonetheless, especially with the key unknown. Both bought by the same person, too, I believe. I wonder if he/she is among us on c.net?

 

This buyer has been successful in bidding for several "quality" Anglos, which, in my opinion, would have needed a great deal of money spent to restore them to top condition.

 

I'm not certain of the buyer's identity, so will not speculate. I did, however, look at c.net names, a few weeks ago, without finding a likely match.

 

Regards,

Peter.

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i am fascinated yet appalled at the spectator sport of watching the insanity in the vintage concertina market right now. and insanity it is! firstly, because of the staggering amounts of dosh people are forking out for instruments that aren't even in good repair. and secondly, because of the stratospheric prices reached by instruments which arguably are more or less in condition. people seem heedless of the simple fact that reed instruments peak differently than all-wood instruments such as violins. there is a point of diminishing value. a point at which too many parts are replacement parts. a point at which you are paying 10 & 12 grand for cumbersome century-old action. i am dumbfounded by all of this. the situation has become grotesque. to me, there comes a point, even if it's out of reverse snobbery, at which one's sense of self-respect and musical integrity dictate going for an instrument without that magic name, but with some kind of halfway reasonable value-for-dollar ratio. i would almost like to see players en masse turn to high-quality accordion-reeded instruments, (the good ones are already plenty expensive), and snobs be damned. if it happened, in 5 or 10 years nobody would even remember that concertina reeds were more valued. there is something deeply offensive and counter to the spirit of the music (my patch of ground is irish, but same to morris & other forms) about what is afoot, IMHO.

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i am fascinated yet appalled at the spectator sport of watching the insanity in the vintage concertina market right now.

Unlike some sports, it's cheaper to watch than participate.

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