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"new Lachenal"

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Over the years I've come across the term "New Lachenal". How does this concertina differ from the old Lachenal? What year was it first made?

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Over the years I've come across the term "New Lachenal". How does this concertina differ from the old Lachenal? What year was it first made?

I really don't know how others might use the term, except in error. I wouldn't consider a Lachenal to be "new" unless it had never been played. "Like new" might be a reasonable descriptive term, though I have seen very few instruments that I feel would deserved the description. There is also the Lachenal "New Model", which was a top-line 6-sided model, of quality comparable (in my opinion) to the 12-sided Edeophone. The New Models I've seen all had domed ends, fine fretwork, and -- those in good condition -- had exceptionally fine reeds. But these have all been called "New Model" by their owners, not simply "New" Lachenals.

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Jim,

My mistake, I meant New Model. Do you know what year they started making them? Howie

I don't. Maybe somebody else here does. Wes?

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" I meant New Model. Do you know what year they started making them? Howie"

 

Both the New Model and the Edeophone appeared in the late 1880s (according to Neil Wayne)

Goran

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1. The Edeo design was registered 1889, but was not for a standard 'treble' model. The 12 sided design gave more space to fit larger reeds. Few Edeos were made until the design was applied to the treble about 1900. 'New Models' continued to be made as the top of range treble during this period.

 

2. 'New Models' were first made slightly earlier, sometime after the change of name (and ownership) to Lachenal & Co about 1873, when the Lachenal range was expanded to include the 'Inimitable' and 'Excelsior'. We can't yet find or predict a date of introduction. But like the Edeo, the early 'New Models' were not the same as the later ones which we recognise as 'New Models'.

 

3. I have seen a 'New Edeophone', marketed (rebadged) by a Scots 'Professor', some time near Lachenals closure in the mid 1930s.

 

4. 'New Models' are typified by raised, Ebony and occasionally Aboyna, ends, rather than flat ends of any of the more usual mahogany or rosewood woods.

 

best wishes ..wes

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4. 'New Models' are typified by raised, Ebony and occasionally Aboyna, ends, rather than flat ends of any of the more usual mahogany or rosewood woods.

I've seen both metal- and rosewood-ended New Models, as well. The diffrence was in the design and craftsmanship, not the material of the ends.

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Wes:"1. The Edeo design was registered 1889, but was not for a standard 'treble' model......."The 12 sided design gave more space to fit larger reeds"

 

Goran:Duet or some larger English? Can you give some more detail Wes? Have you seen any advertisements on the 'novelties' of it...we have discussed a few times if there were verbalized motivations except the looks for the raised ends for example. And was the name "Edeophone" registred 1889? In a patent? Were these early ones flatended? It is also doubtful (except in extreme cases) if you actually get many more large reeds into the 12 sides...certainly in a more attractive and regular way, but...Was that outspoken as a motivation for it?

BTW...have you seen if the flatended 12 sided instruments were actually called "Edeophones" too by the maker (Lachenals) ?

 

Wes:"2. 'New Models' were first made slightly earlier, sometime after the change of name (and ownership) to Lachenal & Co about 1873, when the Lachenal range was expanded to include the 'Inimitable' and 'Excelsior'. "

 

Goran:Were these marketed as "The New Model" or as "Inimitable" and "Excelsior"?

Can you please specify the features of these models respectively?

 

Wes:"We can't yet find or predict a date of introduction. But like the Edeo, the early 'New Models' were not the same as the later ones which we recognise as 'New Models'.

 

Goran:So...what about what we recognize as "The New Model" ...do you have any

better date for this than Neil's "end of 1880s" ? Those I have had have been made basically with the same technical outfit as the contemporary Edeophones:reed pan, mechanism, buttons, reeds, general precision,'best quality' bellows...

What about the "Inimitable" and "Excelsior"..was that mainly external 'luxury' outfits rather than 'musically/technically' selected products?

( I once came across an instrument with the cheap(est?) style basic construction but fitted with all possible luxury...silver keys,mother of pearl and silver inlays,gilt leather decorations,special fretwork...seemingly never been played of course...and assumingly having been ordered just for aestetic prestige...odd...)

 

Goran Rahm

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Jim:

Metal ends were an optional extra at extra cost, like most models. Note my reply says 'typified' as most are ebony ended, and that earlier ones were different.

 

Goran:

So many questions! I don't have time to write a book to answer them. You will have to wait until someone involved with researching Lachenal history reaches a point where they can write something detailed which can be properly published.

 

The Edeo was a 'Registered Design' which has its own registration number and prevents copying. A modern example is the Coca-cola bottle. See http://www.bl.uk/services/information/pate...ts/designs.html.

 

Lachnal made many different models. 'New', 'Excelsior' and 'Inimitable' are only three of them. There are others such as 'Popular', 'Paragon' and 'Non-pareil'.

 

best wishes ..wes

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On the Concertina Connection site "Rare" Concertinas - a picture gallery, there is a "New" Lachenal Edeophone with green buttons and what looks like plastic ends. They surely don't come any newer!

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...a "New" Lachenal Edeophone with green buttons and what looks like plastic ends.

I believe there was a time when such plastic was rare and considered by some to be excitingly modern. Quite a different perspective from today's derisive "mother of toilet seat" description.

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Thanks a lot Wes, seems we can settle on *1889 or before* for the appearance of the "New Model" then and evidently this was distinctly different from the other 'newish' luxury variants. Nothing here about the early 12 sided ones though...existing maybe only on individual order, and not named "Edeophone" yet?

 

What about the saying:"20 year maker to the late Wm. Wheatstone &Co"

How shall that be interpreted? ("to" what does that mean?)

Who was J.A. Astley.... of Oldham?

 

Goran

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What struck me most, which I hadn't realised, was the difference in price (even then) between brass and steel reeded instruments of otherwise identical spec e.g.:

 

Top left page, Item 1: £2 12s 6d, item 3 same spec but steel reeds: £4 10s.

 

Clive

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seems we can settle on *1889 or before* for the appearance of the "New Model"

Remember that the price list in the link above is 1884 or later.

 

Nothing here about the early 12 sided ones though...existing maybe only on individual order, and not named "Edeophone" yet?

 

Note Lachenal considered the Edeophone to be a different instrument, thus they advertise 'The Edeophone', The English','The Anglo' and 'The Duet' on a handbill.

 

What about the saying:"20 year maker to the late Wm. Wheatstone &Co"

As recommended in another thread, read Stephen Chambers 'Louis Lachenal: Engineer and Concertina Manufacturer' in Free Reed Journal Volume 1.

 

Who was J.A. Astley.... of Oldham?

Ace concertina player and prime mover in that area, see Maccann: Concertinist's Guide at www.maccann-duet.com . Recorded on cylinders in the period 1900-1905, but not known to be issued or still exist.

 

You've used up your allocation of questions for this week!

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