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Jeff Stallard

I've Made A Big Decision

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Back in May, I bought an 1880 Lachenal EC. Prior to buying that, I lived by a rule: do not buy vintage instruments. Well I broke that rule, and now I'm wishing I hadn't. No, the Lachenal isn't a lemon or anything. I've enjoyed it a lot, but as any vintage instrument will, it needed some work. Reed 13 was popping, and some pivot posts were popping out of the action pan, due to the dry winter I assume. I fixed both easily enough, but it just reminded me why I made the rule in the first place. I just want to play the music and not have to worry about taking care of the instrument. But the biggest reason I've decided to sell it is that, after a year of being a concertinist, I've come to the conclusion that I prefer the sound of accordian reeded concertinas. Yes, I know that's grounds for having my thumbs ripped out, but that's the way it is.

 

I'll be putting together a description soon, with pictures of everything, and I'll naturally give the wonderful people here the first chance at it. I mainly posted this because I thought you'd all get a kick out of it, particlarly RELCOLLECT. I'll probably buy a Jackie with part of the money, just so I have something that doesn't suck like my Stagi (great tone, but LOUSY workmanship).

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Sorry the Lachenal didn't work out for you Jeff. She is a pretty instrument as I remember.

 

Keep your eyes open. Used Albions come on the market from time to time and with a call to the Button Box you might end up as lucky as Barbara (Greenferry) did. Bon chance.

 

Edit: I can't help this: Any instrument, new or old needs care and tweeking from time to time.

Edited by Mark Evans

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enough, but it just reminded me why I made the rule in the first place. I just want to play the music and not have to worry about taking care of the instrument. But the biggest reason I've decided to sell it is that, after a year of being a concertinist, I've come to the conclusion that I prefer the sound of accordian reeded concertinas. Yes, I know that's grounds for having my thumbs ripped out, but that's the way it is.

 

Nah, torture is not mandatory for the crime of preferring accordion reeds. It's all a matter of personal preference. I have both types; some people I play with prefer the sound of the vintage reeds, some the accordion reeds. Play what you enjoy.

 

But Mark is right; all concertinas require upkeep, all have periodic issues, though I'd have to agree that my new Morse and old Herrington are somehwhat less finicky than my cherished old instrument.

 

A guitar player I sometimes gig with looked at my concertina the first time we got together and said "that's a real CONTRAPTION, isn't it?"

 

Contraptions need maintanance, whether accordion or traditional reeded.

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But the biggest reason I've decided to sell it is that, after a year of being a concertinist, I've come to the conclusion that I prefer the sound of accordian reeded concertinas. Yes, I know that's grounds for having my thumbs ripped out, but that's the way it is.

This is just to let you know, as a courtesy service, that you have been booked in for re-education at the Wheatstone Memorial Centre and Torture Chamber. Expect a knock on the door at 3 a.m. sometime very soon.

 

You too will learn to love Big Brother.

 

Chris

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:ph34r: Nice knowin' ye lad. Here's ta' comin' out 'tuther side wid most a yer parts intact.

 

I do here by offer ta' hold that little Lachenal wid' the lovely bellows papers til' ya' mend :) !

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Re-education eh? That's good. I understand what you all are saying about everything needing tweaking, but that's just one part of this equation. If maintenance was my only issue, I wouldn't be selling it.

 

It's not like I'm giving up the concertina; I'm just giving up VINTAGE concertinas. Hmm...I guess in this case, the Vintage classification describes the vast majority of concertinas though. Oh well, I can live with it.

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Well, as my partner Anne would say, if we were all the same we'd all play the fiddle.

 

Best of luck with it.

 

Chris

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Jeff,

 

I also prefer the sound and feel of the accordion reeded instruments. By feel I mean the air resistance

and modulation etc.

 

I have owned a Jeffries and a Wheatsone and have had on long term loan Jeffries and Lachenal.

 

I still prefer the accordion reeds.

 

I have owned many "vintage" instruments including guitars, mandolins , banjos, button accordions etc. A generalization that "vintage" means "better" in my experience is unfounded. It's all case by case.

 

I have mentioned a few times that in my opinion instruments are "kits" when acquired, and all need tweaking to our tastes. I prefer limited tweaking and more playing and I,as have you, concluded that

newer is my preference; and accordion reeded instruments are my preference ( subject to change)

 

Best of luck

 

Jeff

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Now this is creepy. The only guy who agrees with me has the same name as me. Well here's to you brother! You have an excellent name, and and excellent opinion!

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Now this is creepy. The only guy who agrees with me has the same name as me. Well here's to you brother! You have an excellent name, and and excellent opinion!
Don't let them get you down, Jeff -

I am building one with accordion reeds! :)

/Henrik

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Jeff -

In December, I put my Lachenal EC (1885) up for sale and bought an Albion. I like the sound, the fast response of the buttons and how light the Albion is. There was nothing really "wrong" with my Lachenal - I just liked the Albion better! It also helps that I live within an hour of the Button Box and I go there and periodically play whatever they have in stock.

 

So you are not alone!

 

regards

Jay

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Not at all Jeff. A member here Bruce Boysen (I know I've made a hash of the last name...sorry Bruce) had a Lachenal new model I think. It had gone through an overhall and he ended up trading it in on a new Albion with the ebonized end peices (#277). He already owned a cherry ended Albion (#77). Only reason I remember is that Barbara (Greenferry) #77's new owner came over to the house for a music party and I got a chance to take that nice concertina for a spin.

 

Lovely instrument and oddly enough very different in tone from mine (#209). #77 has a beautiful, warm tone as opposed to mine which I find beautiful and sharp (she was a brassy tart when I bought her new and an association with me has only encouraged that forwardness).

 

Bruce played that instrument for all it's worth judging by the nicely broken in bellows. The action is superb with an intonation that is right on. I don't see how you could go wrong with an Albion.

Edited by Mark Evans

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My only concern with an Albion is that it's not 48-button. I wouldn't be able to play one of my favorites - "Meditation" - on it because there are a few notes that go waaaaay up there.

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My only concern with an Albion is that it's not 48-button. I wouldn't be able to play one of my favorites - "Meditation" - on it because there are a few notes that go waaaaay up there.

 

That's a consideration Jeff. I used to play an Aeola 64 note, but I swear that last half octave was only good for makin' the neighbohood dogs howel at 3:00 in the morning after a really good party :lol: .

 

The range was a nagging concern when I bought the Albion and for a while when jamming with some of my buddies who encourage craized ornamentation and improvisation, I would run off the top of the beast and nowhere to go. A little re-thinking and I learned to work within the range limitations with an octave down jump when necessary.

 

Accordion reeds are larger and to pack a full 48 under the hood results in a rather heavy instrument. The Albion's lack of weight and lightning fast action earned my devotion. I've started throwing my spare change in the ball jar over the stove in hopes I will remain on the right side of the sod long enough to purchase one of the first Morse Tenor/trebles with concertina reeds.

Edited by Mark Evans

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Oh dear. I must confess this is very worrying for those of us at the SPCR (Society for Promoting Concertina Reeds). I guess I'm going to have to redouble my efforts printing and handing out tracts and leaflets. Repent oh ye sinners before it is too late!

 

Chris

Edited by Chris Timson

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Oh dear. I must confess this is very worrying for those of us at the SPCR (Society for Promoting Concertina Reeds). I guess I'm going to have to redouble my efforts printing and handing out tracts and leaflets. Repent oh ye sinners before it is too late!

I guess it's already too late to enlist the help of the Salvation Army?:(

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Thank you, Jim and Chris, I just spat water all over my keyboard!

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