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What About B Major?


Susanne

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I can't find the B chord on the chord chart. Tried to make one up by simply adding notes to each other, but it's a very awkward chord to play. Why is B flat there and not B?

 

For those who don't know, I play an English.

Edited by Susanne
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I can't find the B chord on the chord chart. Tried to make one up by simply adding notes to each other, but it's a very awkward chord to play.

In the right hand (or an octave higher in the left hand) the B-major chord should be:

... B with the middle finger

... D# with the index finger

... F# with the ring finger

Is that awkward for you?

 

You could also use the Eb in the opposite hand to substitute for the D#, but it might not sound quite right if your instrument isn't in even-tempered tuning. (If you don't know about different temperaments, it's not important. But if you play the D# and Eb together and they clash, then that substitution probably won't sound very nice, either.) If the Eb-for-D# substitution does sound OK, then it can be helpful to use it when playing B7, since that leaves the same-side index finger free for playing the A. :)

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  • 3 weeks later...
B - Middle finger

D# - Index finger

F# - Ring finger

 

Does anyone else do it differently? I wonder why the chord chart doesn't include that one...

 

I don't have my concertina with me, but I'm pretty sure that I'd sometimes also play that:

 

B - Middle finger (2)

D# - Ring finger (3)

F# - Index finger (1)

 

though in general such close-spaced chords sound nasty.

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B - Middle finger

D# - Index finger

F# - Ring finger

Does anyone else do it differently? I wonder why the chord chart doesn't include that one...

I don't have my concertina with me, but I'm pretty sure that I'd sometimes also play that:

B - Middle finger (2)

D# - Ring finger (3)

F# - Index finger (1)

though in general such close-spaced chords sound nasty.

On a standard treble English, that would be the fingering for the third octave (and I don't think the Morse goes that high). In the lower octave (RH) I think you would have to invert your hand to do it that way.

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B - Middle finger (2)

D# - Ring finger (3)

F# - Index finger (1)

On a standard treble English, that would be the fingering for the third octave (and I don't think the Morse goes that high). In the lower octave (RH) I think you would have to invert your hand to do it that way.

 

Yes - sorry - I got that wrong. What I meant was:

 

B - Ring finger (3)

D# - Index finger (1)

F# - Middle finger (2)

 

Quite how I managed to get every single note wrong I don't know! Anyway, I hope my suggestion didn't lead to any hospitalisations :)

 

Edit: Actually I checked at home today and this is actually my preferred fingering - it feels more comfortable to me, and also makes the 1st finger (and the 2nd) much freeer (is that how you spell it?!) to come off the D# and be used on some other note higher up.

Edited by RatFace
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