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Rhomylly

Warm Fuzzies

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Maybe David won't see this and harrass me forever.

I've spared the forum and done my harassing via another medium.

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Fie on you, David. Fie Fie.

 

Why don't you spare me and harrass the forum?

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Last July my dear old Uncle Bill died after a long decline. As is usual in our family, we took his ashes to my childhood home on a small coastal river. From the family rowboat we poured the ashes into the river while the rest of the gathering watched from the deck of the house. I played The Banks of Sullane while the deposition went on. It is one of the most mournful and beautiful tunes that I have.

When his time comes I will put my father there; when it's my turn, I too, will wash downstream to the Pacific. Maybe someone will be kind enough to play for me.

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I knew Appalachian tunes came from Ireland and Scotland, I just never thought of Austria as an origin. That is so neat.

Well, in the case of Under the Double Eagle, I doubt that it's part of any Appalachian family's ancient immigrant heritage. Popular songs and tunes can work there way into tradition from outside, too, and I'm pretty sure that Under the Double Eagle has been popular with marching bands from John Philip Sousa's time (if not before) up to the present. In fact, when I played in a marching band as a kid, I thought it was one of Sousa's own.

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Robert your posting reminded me of words that were said at a non religious funeral I went to recently.It was a quote by George Bernard Shaw and I am sorry that I cannot quote the words exactly but it went as follows,

That life is like a river,its starts as a stream quickly darting twisting and turning down a mountain side,until it joins a river and then steadily and sedately moves through the countryside at a slow leasurely pace until it opens up into the sea.

Alan

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Alan, that was lovely.

 

Jim, is the marching band where you played the tuba?

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Jim, is the marching band where you played the tuba?

No. Trumpet and French horn in marching bands. Tuba was independent and later in life.

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I love the idea of the tuba. Was it just for fun?

It was, but I never got very good at it. Still not sure whether the problem was me or the tuba, since I did learn to play my brother's trombone.

 

I decided to try it after hearing a couple of tuba players on separate occasions do beautiful work with traditional dance music. E.g., string band with fiddle, mandolin, and tuba, and the tuba doing much more than "oom pahe.g., running bass lines and even sometimes melody.

 

Maybe I'll try again, some day. I have this fantasy of a tuba-uilleann pipes duo. :) Maybe an anglo instead of the pipes?

Edited by JimLucas

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Hey Jim,

 

Is that an invitation? :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

 

I'll have to start practicing!

 

I'm still blown away that you tried the tuba. I'm fooling around with an alto sax. I like the fact that it is so different from everything else I play.

 

Helen

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I love the idea of the tuba. Was it just for fun?

It was, but I never got very good at it. Still not sure whether the problem was me or the tuba, since I did learn to play my brother's trombone.

 

I decided to try it after hearing a couple of tuba players on separate occasions do beautiful work with traditional dance music. E.g., string band with fiddle, mandolin, and tuba, and the tuba doing much more than "oom pahe.g., running bass lines and even sometimes melody.

 

Maybe I'll try again, some day. I have this fantasy of a tuba-uilleann pipes duo. :) Maybe an anglo instead of the pipes?

B) Again I shall stray a bit off topic, but, it IS about a marching band...

 

I have to brag SOMEWHERE...didn't want to start a whole new thread...about my daughter's accomplishments in the UMASS Minuteman Marching Band.

 

(Re the Minuteman/Bunker Hill reference...my apologies to those of you ('Redcoats') in the UK, the mother country, but....well, it's all just history, now....there WAS a move a while ago to try to change that name to the Grey Wolves or something, but, nobody went for it.)

 

Anyway, she's in the Drumline: http://www.umassdrumline.org/

 

Click on the 'Media' link, then, listen to the sound files if you want....see where you'd put in the concertinas? Hahah

 

I love 'Birdland,' but, my daughter (Rainy) recommends the 'Conga' one or 'Cadence.'

 

BTW, the football team is so far undefeated! So is Rainy...she just keeps marching, even when it's cold....

 

She is one of the cymbal players, in the cymbal line, and you can see her in the pics but it's hard to explain here which one she is. She's shorter than most of the players, has her hair dyed red/pink here, and has it in short ponytails...

 

I do have some more recent, clearer pics, but not able to post them yet.

 

I am so impressed with how hard these players work. I go to most of the home games to hear them and see them march.

 

The training has just about been like the military! But, once you make it throught the 'boot camp,' band camp, things get better.

 

So...the concertina...

 

Should we have a concertina boot camp? Oh, no...

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Hi--I'd like to share my warm fuzzy experience: While on my honeymoon, which was a 3 week cross country trip, my wife and I brought our instruments with us. While we were staying at my parent's home, we had a dinner party with some of my relatives and old family friends. They asked us to play some music for them, so we played some old time and Irish tunes-which they liked okay (i think?). But then a neighbor of my parent's brought down a tune book of old Yiddish folk and Yiddish theater songs. As we started to sight read through the tunes, they all perked up and started clapping and dancing, and singing along--Wow -it was groovy--When I think about this experience,it brings joy to my heart. Unfortunately, most of these relatives are now deceased.. Luckily, a friend of mine,

who was there, made a video of it--so I can revist this memory--when the mood strikes---Wow- I haven't shared this story in a long time--thanks for the oppotunity---Steven---

Edited by Steven Hollander

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Great story Steven.

 

What instruments do you and your wife play?

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Great story Steven.

 

What instruments do you and your wife play?

Hi Helen- I play 5-string banjo (old-time clawhammer), English concertina, Anglo concertina, and Bodhran. My wife,Ruth, plays fiddle, Celtic harp,and piano accordian (and over the years has played some flute, clarinet, and mandolin. We are currently playing in an old-time band called :"Public Domain String Band", and we occassional perform and play for dances as a duet. I also play in a contra dance band called: "Loose Shoes".--Steven--

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Should we have a concertina boot camp?

No need for a full camp, just some simple advice...

 

.... Don't leave your concertina in the boot (especially on a hot day).

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Hi Steven,

 

Hey you guys play a lot of the same instruments that I play.

 

I'd love to hear your band. Don't suppose you live anywhere near Cleveland Ohio do you?

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As a slightly advanced beginner, but berginner, frequently I ahve been asked politely or not poltely to stop my playing.

Until now this has been more frequent that the positive experience to be asked to go ahead.

 

Thhis summer playiong outsiode togerther with a friend, we have received some applaus.

 

Recnetly during a biorthday dinner among friends, O made people sing with me and we enjoyed it all together very much. Remark : It was not in the dark and after too much Red Wine !

 

But the nicest moment has been some few days ago, when going to school to teke my 9 year old daughter home, walking by foot - in time - with the Concertina hanging on the shoulder, since I should have soime waiting time.

 

When I arrived to the School, I had still about 15 minutes to wait, nobody to be seen, so I took out my little Anglo and stared to waqrm up.

Then the children came to the yard out of their classrooms, joined me, asked me to play their favourite children songs and started to sing with me, singing well and about half an hour concert, I finished and extremely politely I heard with pleasure an dsurprise say to me :

 

We enjoyed very much with you.............

 

I replied : And I with you.............

 

It was for me a premium for all my efforts and a copmpensation for all the negative expriences.

 

And imagine 7 - 10 year old kids, girls and boys nicely singing, about 15 of them around and sincerley enjoyxung and politely thanking.

 

Nowaday kids !!!

 

It has been a pleasure to read your experiences.

 

Regards

Joachim Delp

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Hi

 

Some warm fuzzies:

1. Last summer playing together with Joachim on a seaside hill on the Bask shore overlooking the ocean. A group of youngsters with surfboards passing by with thumbs up and a big smile.

 

2. Playing together with a friend who sings (very nice) and plays guitar. He very often surpises me with new songs that I never heard before. Most of the time I can easily pick up the melody (when he is singing in the right key), but very often somewhere in the melody he announces a musical part that I am supposed to play. In 99% of the cases I am too uncertain and as a result I am completely dissatisfied with my playing.

But there is this 1%!! My friend started singing a tune (in G) and the melody-line felt as if it has been living inside me. While playing I could hear in my head very nice variations and second melody lines. So as soon as he indacated that it was time for my instrumental part, I really could realize what I have heard inside. As a result I saw chicken skin coming in my friends arms!!!

 

Hoping for a lot more warm fuzzies!

 

Henk

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