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Shiro

A Musical Experiment

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I'm a person who wants to learn to foot-play the concertina, in addition to usual practice. How possible do you think foot-playing with the concertina is? I'm trying to do this because the way the buttons are positioned makes it at least seem possible, and I want to learn to play two instruments at once.

 

Any feedback?

 

Edit; And on the VERY rare chance that anyone has already tried this, I would greatly appreciate some advice.

Edited by Shiro

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I seem to recall Jim Lucus has some experience with this. I think he posted a picture of it on this site.

bruce boysen, has enough trouble using his hands to play.

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I seem to recall Jim Lucus has some experience with this. I think he posted a picture of it on this site.

bruce boysen, has enough trouble using his hands to play.

 

You mean this? http://www.concertina.net/jl_realduet.html

 

It's a nice picture. I really do need to try that some time.

Edited by Shiro

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Yes, that's the picture! It seems like it would be impossible to play with the feet.....but then I think about what some people without arms can do, pretty much anything. Maybe it is possible.

bruce

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I'm a person who wants to learn to foot-play the concertina, in addition to usual practice. How possible do you think foot-playing with the concertina is? I'm trying to do this because the way the buttons are positioned makes it at least seem possible, and I want to learn to play two instruments at once.

 

Any feedback?

 

 

That sounds like really hard work to me!

 

If you want to play two instruments at once, you could try a mouth organ in a harness. French Canadians accorionistes do a sort of foot stomping rhythm to accompany themselves; I've seen a French piper wear morris bells to add to a foot beat. Or you can play hi-hat cymbals with one foot and a bass drum with the other.

 

I did once experiment with holding the left headboard of a concertina (a Crane duet, but could work with an anglo) under my left arm or between my knees so that I could play the right hand end while using my left hand to play a tabor pipe. Interesting, but ...

 

I've also had a go at doing a little flatfoot clogging while playing concertina or mouth organ, and singing - I got that idea from English folk singer, Pete Coe who plays melodeon or bouzouki while clogging. It's the ideal way to combine an aerobic workout with music practice!

 

Cheers,

 

Bill

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Though it has rarely been seen in the last 60 years, there is a free reed instrument designed to be played with the feet called the foot bass. It was invented by Joseph Alexandry from Namur (Belgium) and patented in 1894.

 

post-436-1129943633_thumb.jpg

 

They are made today by Harry Geuns and available from The Concertina Connection. You can read about them here on their website.

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Thank goodness. I thought "foot play" was a euphemism for "stomp on."

 

Caj

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Though it has rarely been seen in the last 60 years, there is a free reed instrument designed to be played with the feet called the foot bass. It was invented by Joseph Alexandry from Namur (Belgium) and patented in 1894.

 

I've often wondered about these - has anyone any experience of either hearing one "in the flesh" so to speak? Or even tried playing one?

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Though it has rarely been seen in the last 60 years, there is a free reed instrument designed to be played with the feet called the foot bass. It was invented by Joseph Alexandry from Namur (Belgium) and patented in 1894.

 

I've often wondered about these - has anyone any experience of either hearing one "in the flesh" so to speak? Or even tried playing one?

 

I haven't seen one "in the flesh" but they have a sound file ont the website and it seemed pretty impressive. howie

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Though it has rarely been seen in the last 60 years, there is a free reed instrument designed to be played with the feet called the foot bass. It was invented by Joseph Alexandry from Namur (Belgium) and patented in 1894.
I've often wondered about these - has anyone any experience of either hearing one "in the flesh" so to speak? Or even tried playing one?

Someone had one at a concertina gathering in Seattle a couple of years ago (coincident with Bob Tedrow's first touring box passing through there). As I recall, I liked the sound, but wasn't personally attracted to trying to play it. Maybe Tom Lawrence knows whose it was and can tell us more?

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... you could try a mouth organ in a harness.

 

Anyone had any success with concertina and mouth-organ at the same time?

 

I had a notable failure - the two actions were too similar. I found it impossible to separate the blow/suck from the pull/push, and nearly exploded. :blink:

 

The other problem was working out which instrument was playing the wrong note - but most often it was both.

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... you could try a mouth organ in a harness.
Anyone had any success with concertina and mouth-organ at the same time?

You should have a listen to Rick Epping sometime, and Mick Kinsella has been trying it too.

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Anyone had any success with concertina and mouth-organ at the same time?

Ken Sweeney is unreasonably and spectacularly successful with mouth-organ and English concertina at the same time. :)

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Anyone had any success with concertina and mouth-organ at the same time?

Ken Sweeney is unreasonably and spectacularly successful with mouth-organ and English concertina at the same time. :)

Mick Kinsella has been mentioned before by Stephen. He (Mick) plays mouth organ in combination with EC as well.

Just listen (and look) to this video clip (2.6 Mb)

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Anyone had any success with concertina and mouth-organ at the same time?
Ken Sweeney is unreasonably and spectacularly successful with mouth-organ and English concertina at the same time. :)
Mick Kinsella has been mentioned before by Stephen. He (Mick) plays mouth organ in combination with EC as well.

Just listen (and look) to this video clip (2.6 Mb)

Nice, but in that video Mick is just playing sustained harmony notes or chords on the English against a slow air on the harmonica. Ken, on the other hand, plays dance tunes at full speed on both instruments... even with harmony, if I'm remembering correctly. And what I remember is from at least ten years ago; I wonder what he's doing with them today.

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Anyone had any success with concertina and mouth-organ at the same time?
Ken Sweeney is unreasonably and spectacularly successful with mouth-organ and English concertina at the same time. :)
Mick Kinsella has been mentioned before by Stephen. He (Mick) plays mouth organ in combination with EC as well.

Just listen (and look) to this video clip (2.6 Mb)

Nice, but in that video Mick is just playing sustained harmony notes or chords on the English against a slow air on the harmonica. Ken, on the other hand, plays dance tunes at full speed on both instruments...

As does Rick Epping, who has also been doing it for many years. Mick Kinsella has only started playing concertina recently (influenced by Rick, who he sometimes plays with along with Brendan Power), and I doubt if his brass reeded Wheatstone would be "up to speed" for those dance tunes at full speed, even if he was.

 

I guess it's probably easier to accomplish on two instruments as disimilar as the English concertina and mouth organ, the Anglo might prove too confusing altogether ? :huh:

Edited by Stephen Chambers

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According to a highly reputable source (Roald Dahl's "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory"), a course of Vitamin Wonka will enable you to play the piano with your toes. This vitamin is included in certain products made in Mr Wonka's own factory. Regrettably the products currently to be found widely on sale are made under licence elsewhere, and do not contain the magic ingredient.

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Ken ... plays dance tunes at full speed on both instruments...
As does Rick Epping, who has also been doing it for many years.

 

I guess it's probably easier to accomplish on two instruments as disimilar as the English concertina and mouth organ, the Anglo might prove too confusing altogether ? :huh:

Seems to me that same argument would suggest that one should have difficulty coordinating the two hands on an anglo or duet. I expect that the amount of difficulty depends on the individual making the attempt.

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